ApplegumPam Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 9:42pm
post #1 of

What purpose do you think the cake board - the one you 'present' your cake has?

 

Is it a continuation of your cake design and always decorated to compliment?

 

OR ... do you just view it as JUST something that you use to carry your cake on?

 

I ask, and wanted to get some discussion going on this subject because I see so many 'really nice' cakes being (IMO) spoilt by the board they sit on.

I wondered if people actually 'see' what I see - or if in fact they think it is as important as I do??

To me presentation doesn't stop with the cake...   I include the board in every design I do.   It either plays a part in the design in the colour/cover/texture?  or it is designed to be as 'inconspicuous' as possible  ie. fondant covered same as cake.

 

When I see boards covered with crumpled alfoil or greaseproof paper over whatever is available I often wonder WHY?   I know 'money' MAY be a contributing factor - but I just see ALL the work that goes into the cake .... AND ... all that sticks out  - is a hideous board??

OK - over to you guys.....

52 replies
jennicake Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 9:58pm
post #2 of

Good question!

 

As a non-pro, I will admit that I had no idea of the importance of decorating your cake board until I joined this forum.  I had seen plenty of pictures of beautiful cakes on a well decorated board and thought it looked beautiful and cohesive, but never really noticed the board itself.  Even when I make cakes now, I remember to do something with the board but it still doesn't get as much of my attention as it should -- something I intend to change!  It's just not something I think about until its usually too late.

 

So... hope that answers the "why" part of your question.  This is why you see a lot of uncovered boards, foil, greaseproof paper, etc.  Sometimes people just dont know better.

kaylawaylalayla Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 10:05pm
post #3 of

AI really never notice unless it's one of the extremes. Like a very nicely decorated board with fondant. Or a very poorly wrapped foil board. I don't notice anything myself because the only cakes I've ever done have been served on a stand with a board as big as the bottom layer of cake, or for delivery at my job inside a box with a board the size of the cake.

fillylily Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 11:33pm
post #4 of

AIm glad this is being discussed as at the moment im trying to decide whether to use a board for a wedding cake i am making for my daughter. I would love to use my glass cake stand which sadly is exactly the size of the bottom tier 12 inches. I cannot find a slighty larger stand that is both presentable and affordable so i thought to elevate the cake a bit using a board but still put it on top of my cake stand. Any suggestions? Other reason is my daughter wants the cake ganached witht that "messy look" because she doesn't like fondant. And she wants it to look homemade so i thought my green glass cake stand would have been perfect.

ApplegumPam Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 11:42pm
post #5 of

What is the rest of the cake like?   Stand ? do you mean 'elevated' as on a pedestal ?

I'm not sure what you mean by 'wanting it to look home-made'  -  is this supposed to mean... LESS important?   bit confused

kikiandkyle Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 12:27am
post #6 of

AI think that a wedding cake presented on a decent half inch or more thick board (think the silver pre coated ones) is fine, with a nice ribbon on the outside. The ones I have an issue with are the clearly home wrapped, poorly, with the wrong material ones, and I do notice them, it's not just you!

DeniseNH Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 12:31am
post #7 of

That messy look is called Stucco and is the "in" thing in shabby chic, sheek, chick, drat that word never know how to properly spell it but you get my drift.  Sometimes, shopping antique stores or asking friends for a flat round glass plate will get you what you want.  I'm picturing a flat green glass plate on a green glass cake stand.

sixinarow Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:02am
post #8 of

I never noticed them before either, but man, it makes a huge difference. Not much $ or effort to cover a board in fondant and trim with ribbon, but it adds such a professional finish. I'll never go back, that's for sure! ;)

AZCouture Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:08am
post #9 of

AAbsolutely finish the board. it's like putting on a fancy dress and slipping on flip flops to go out it. Doesn't have to be a fancy cake, any decorated cake should have a complimentary "pair of shoes" with a ribbon wrapped edge.

cazza1 Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:53am

I think a good board makes a huge difference.  If I am decorating for a special event I will go to some effort.  As a hobby baker, however, I often forgo the added expense and put my cake on a stand or a nice chopping board.

ApplegumPam Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 3:29am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cazza1 

I think a good board makes a huge difference.  If I am decorating for a special event I will go to some effort.  As a hobby baker, however, I often forgo the added expense and put my cake on a stand or a nice chopping board.


Do you think it really ADDS that much in the overall cost of a cake?

I wouldn't hesitate to NOT use a board if I thought it would not be any detriment to the overall look of the cake - but IF it needed a board I would spend the extra $$


 

dukeswalker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 3:40am

Oh my gosh - for me?  The board is a must - unless the cake is going directly on a beautiful cake stand or plateau.  I'm working on a Minion one right now and I made the base to look like diamond plate...It just *completes* the cake.

Smckinney07 Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 5:36am

AHonestly, I don't even care for the fancy foil. I know many people use it, Ive even seen top professionals use it. There's just something about it that seems unfinished to me. It doesn't even have to be fondant, I've used contrasting scrapbook paper covered with clear contact paper in a pinch. Just something, anything! I mean no offense to anyone but when I see a beautiful cake on a plain board it does take away from the design.

fillylily Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 10:06pm

AApplegumPam ... Yes i mean elevated. My as cake stand has a 5" foot but just 12" in diameter so there is no ledge on the plate when i put the also 12" cake on it. So i thought if i put the cake on a thick board first then on the glass cake stand, it might look better? By homemade i mean frosted with chocolate ganache which is just swirled around, not smoothed over the cake like a fondant. Sorry i don't know how to explain it better. The unfinished look Smckinney07 is what im trying to avoid using the fancy foil covered board. But i will continue to look around for a suitable size cake stand. I want to show you guys my cake stand but i have no idea how to attach photos here.

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 11:19pm

Honestly I have never seen a cake with a fondant covered board before I came here. But after seeing them they do add something special. I also never noticed crappy boards before coming here, but now they jump out and detract from the attractiveness of the cake. I am doing a ruffle cake right now and experimenting with different looks for the board. Hopefully I'll have some great pics to post tomorrow.

maybenot Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 4:04am

For me, the right cake board is like the right pair of shoes for an outfit.  It just has to "go" with the cake, or it's just wrong.

jennicake Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 6:15am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smckinney07 

I've used contrasting scrapbook paper covered with clear contact paper in a pinch. 

 

I liked this idea so much that I went out and bought some contact paper today so I can do this.  I already love it!  Looks fantastic :)

fillylily Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 10:12pm

AJennicake is there a photo you can share with us?

MBalaska Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 10:40pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by sixinarow 
I never noticed them before either, but man, it makes a huge difference. Not much $ or effort to cover a board in fondant and trim with ribbon, but it adds such a professional finish. I'll never go back, that's for sure! ;)

sixinarow,

do you just cover only the top of the board with fondant, or top & down the side of the board?

Do you still 'glue' the cake board with the cake on it, to the fondant covered board so it doesn't slip around?

What is your choice of glue for ribbon attachment?

 

I either cover cardboard with food grade paper, or buy gold/silver commercial boards & drums for dress up. But it would save some shopping/money to use fondant.

* (I guess my steel-toed leather high-top boots keep me out of the running with the shoe analogy.)

lcubed83 Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 10:55pm

I'm a hobby baker-  I use a 16" board that came with my kitchen floor tiles, kinda like Masonite.  I usually cover it with a piece from a plastic table cloth, in a color that complements the cake.  Nothing fancy, but I don't like the foil for some cakes.

 

(Cake inspired by Buttercream Fantasies)

sixinarow Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 11:11pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MBalaska 

Quote:

sixinarow,

do you just cover only the top of the board with fondant, or top & down the side of the board?

Do you still 'glue' the cake board with the cake on it, to the fondant covered board so it doesn't slip around?

What is your choice of glue for ribbon attachment?

 

I either cover cardboard with food grade paper, or buy gold/silver commercial boards & drums for dress up. But it would save some shopping/money to use fondant.

* (I guess my steel-toed leather high-top boots keep me out of the running with the shoe analogy.)

I rub the cake board with a little shortening, cover with fondant and smooth. Cut any overhang off the sides and let dry a day or two.

 

After it's dry, add the ribbon around the edge -- I use hot glue to attach the ribbon..it's not touching any part of the board above, just the ribbon and the edge of the board. I know some people use double stick tape, or glue sticks but I like that the hot glue really cements it on there and I don't worry about it coming off easily and no one is going to get that sucker off there to "accidentally" eat.

 

Then, I attach the cake to the fondant-covered board with buttercream so it won't slide.

milkmaid42 Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 12:00am

I started out with cardboard cake circles covered with fondant and wondered how to finish the thin little edge. Then I discovered foam core and took off from there. To use the shoe analogy, I occasionally get the shoes and then have to find the outfit to go with them. The board becomes an integral part of the whole and once in a while, I like the board even better.

 

When making a board, I first hot glue three or four doll pin stands, (found at Michael's) to the underside. This allows for ease of pick up. I don't use shortening like sixinarow--I just lightly spritz with water-- but from there I do the same. I do wait a few days, though, to let the fondant harden thoroughly before I handle it to attach the ribbon. I don't want finger impressions to mar all that work.

 

If I don't use fondant, I'll use wrapping paper, or contact paper, etc. Since I have become aware of the importance of decorated boards I am always keeping an eye out for different ideas. All my cakes are on boards so they don't come in contact with the decorated board. I'll enclose a pic of my all time favorite I made last fall for an Autumn-themed cake. We happened to have a spectacularly gorgeous fall and the leaves colored unbelievably. I dried a number of them from my yard in my microwave leaf press and decorated the board with them. I covered it with Press 'n' Seal and almost hesitated to place  the cake on it!

 

<a href="http://cakecentral.com/g/i/2852466/this-autumns-leaves-were-spectacular-i-made-the-cake-board-from-those-collected-from-my-yard-and-dried-in-a-microwave-flower-press-i-covered-a-foam-core-board-with-metallic-gold-tissue-paper-and-fixed-the-leaves-down-with-spray-adhesive-and-food/u/700117/flat/1/"><img src="http://cakecentral.com/image/id/4562665/width/400/flags/LL"></a>

 

<a href="http://cakecentral.com/g/i/2850699/another-aspect-of-benefit-cake-to-show-different-leaves/u/700117/flat/1/"><img src="http://cakecentral.com/image/id/4446295/width/400/flags/LL"></a>

 

So, in answer to the original question, I think the board is an essential part of the presentation. I like the comment earlier that it is like dressing up then wearing flip flops.

 

Jan

MBalaska Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 1:34am

Thanks for the detailed instructions. the cakes boards noted in this thread are all cool. so many new things to do.

jennicake Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 1:48am

A

Original message sent by fillylily

Jennicake is there a photo you can share with us?

There sure is :). The paper is lightly patterned but it doesn't show in the picture unfortunately [IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3086586/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

lcubed83 Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 2:07am

I can't figure out how to edit my post-  the inspirational science cake is by Cassiopée Designs.  Buttercreamfantasies is her user name on another site.

BatterUpCake Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 2:11am

I started with plain cardboard, then tin foil...now I have been using embossed floral foil from my local cake store (the same stuff they put on the silver cake drums) I think it looks pretty but definitely not that wow factor like Jennicakes just posted. Maybe it's time for another change....

fillylily Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 2:44am

AThanks for the foto jennicake. I now have ideas with my cakeboard dilemma.

fillylily Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 2:45am

A[quote name="milkmaid42" url="/t/762716/cake-boards-opinions-discuss#post_7435218"]I started out with cardboard cake circles covered with fondant and wondered how to finish the thin little edge. Then I discovered foam core and took off from there. To use the shoe analogy, I occasionally get the shoes and then have to find the outfit to go with them. The board becomes an integral part of the whole and once in a while, I like the board even better.

When making a board, I first hot glue three or four doll pin stands, (found at Michael's) to the underside. This allows for ease of pick up. I don't use shortening like sixinarow--I just lightly spritz with water-- but from there I do the same. I do wait a few days, though, to let the fondant harden thoroughly before I handle it to attach the ribbon. I don't want finger impressions to mar all that work.

If I don't use fondant, I'll use wrapping paper, or contact paper, etc. Since I have become aware of the importance of decorated boards I am always keeping an eye out for different ideas. All my cakes are on boards so they don't come in contact with the decorated board. I'll enclose a pic of my all time favorite I made last fall for an Autumn-themed cake. We happened to have a spectacularly gorgeous fall and the leaves colored unbelievably. I dried a number of them from my yard in my microwave leaf press and decorated the board with them. I covered it with Press 'n' Seal and almost hesitated to place  the cake on it!

URL]

URL]

So, in answer to the original question, I think the board is an essential part of the presentation. I like the comment earlier that it is like dressing up then wearing flip flops.

Jan

Bluehue Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 6:27am
Quote:
Originally Posted by maybenot 

For me, the right cake board is like the right pair of shoes for an outfit.  It just has to "go" with the cake, or it's just wrong.

thumbs_up.gif

 

So sad when you see a beautiful cake *plonked* on a bare cake board.

owatto Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 8:39am

I can not stand seeing a beautifully executed cake on a bare board... I see it as something that separates the hobby bakers from the professionals. When I was a hobby baker I didn't see any point and didn't see why you would, but it adds that extra depth to a cake and makes it look complete. 

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%