JujuSweetz Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 6:00pm
post #1 of

Hi everyone,

I've been in business for over 1 year now and have started selling more cakes than cake pops (my business started exclusively with cake pops). So now I make all kinds of cakes and i do make my own fondant as well. When I usually send a fondant cake quote to a client, they are usually pleased with the price. For example, the cake attached here I charged $139.99 plus tax. The price included 30 servings and the fondant work. The client had no complaints about the price and she understood that the fondant involves a lot of work and it is expensive as well. What do you guys think? Was this cake overpriced? What would you have charged for it?

Thanks!

-Gru-

 

 

 

23 replies
Smckinney07 Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 5:21am
post #2 of

AIf you want my honest opinion I see a lot of problems with the cake. There's major bulging in the bottom tier, your board looks very flimsy, and your fondant work needs to be more clean. I don't think your ready to be selling cakes yet.

I would recommend allowing your cakes to settle before frosting or covering with fondant. Also, practice your fondant work on cake dummies. That way you can charge the proper amount for all your hard work.

Please don't misunderstand, you asked others opinions, you should be properly compensated for your cakes, I only hope to provide some constructive criticism so you can succeed and have a thriving business.

JujuSweetz Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:01am
post #3 of

AThanks for the feedback but my question was about pricing and not if I am ready to sell cakes or not. I have been selling quite a lot of cakes weekly and have never had a complaint about how they look.

vgcea Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:15am
post #4 of

A

Original message sent by JujuSweetz

Thanks for the feedback but my question was about pricing and not if I am ready to sell cakes or not. I have been selling quite a lot of cakes weekly and have never had a complaint about how they look.

The quality of your work goes a long way in determining how you price. If any of the pros here did that cake they would be able to charge a higher price than you did simply because the quality of their work would be better.

Pricing a fondant cake should not be any different from pricing cake pops if you already have a solid pricing structure you were already using for the cake pops. What does it cost you to make the product (doesn't matter if it's cake pops or tiered cake)? How many labor hours are involved? What is your profit margin? It doesn't really matter what the product is, the pricing principles remain the same.

If you need basic pricing info, do a search, there are at least 2,000 threads on pricing.

ApplegumPam Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:31am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by JujuSweetz 

Thanks for the feedback but my question was about pricing and not if I am ready to sell cakes or not. I have been selling quite a lot of cakes weekly and have never had a complaint about how they look.


You've been in business for over a year now

You sell quite a lot of cakes weekly

 

You don't get any complaints about how they look

 

 

 

What prompted you to suddenly think you needed to CHECK whether you were charging the right price??

 

Sorry, but I just don't get it..............   if you can allow me to be honest - I would have to agree that the quality of your product is not fantastic. 

 

Don't get so defensive that you fail to see areas where you can improve - you are only cheating yourself.    Every cake I make, I look at things that I could improve on next time.

 

Using the cake above as an example - I think it would look a lot better if you didn't carry your stripes down the side of the cake and onto the board (they even continue over the edge of the board)

 

Yes, there is a definate bulge in the top tier - something that could be improved

 

Not sure of pricing for your area - but I know my product would have to be a lot better than this to get $150 

Keep doing what you are doing - if you can get it  :)

 

Smckinney07 Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:40am
post #7 of

A

Original message sent by JujuSweetz

Thanks for the feedback but my question was about pricing and not if I am ready to sell cakes or not. I have been selling quite a lot of cakes weekly and have never had a complaint about how they look.

I wasn't trying to be hurtful, as I previously stated. As Pam and V stated, your quality will effect your pricing. Also, you've been asking questions about why your cakes were under/overcooked and needing help making gumpaste figures. Some of which are very basic questions. I was merely suggesting ways you could improve your business I meant no disrespect.

howsweet Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:45am
post #8 of

Juju, I would charge about $300 if I were doing that design, which is really cute, btw.  That would be for a 5 in over an 8 in, 32 serving cake. That said, I do very clean work. So, I agree with what l understood Pam to be saying which is that with a little more effort, you could make a lot more money.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 12:49pm
post #9 of

AI would have charged almost $400 for that style of cake.

That one is leaning. Did you use supports?

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:07pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

I would have charged almost $400 for that style of cake.

That one is leaning. Did you use supports?

Ain't nobody got time for dat!

NJsugarmama Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:36pm

If you put some more practice into making those cake lines cleaner, you can definitely price them higher.  Your details (modeling) are pretty much spot on, although I would agree with the above comment about not trailing your fondant onto the cake board.

 

I'd even move your cake onto a cake drum and work from there.  It gives it a more refined look.  There is value in that, too.

 

Hope this helps:)

Godot Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:48pm

AIf you do insist on trailing your fondant down onto the cake board use a drum instead and finish it off properly with a ribbon. Regular boards are too thin for that 'look'.

sixinarow Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:49pm

The top tier looks like it's getting pretty squashed, did it look like that right after you covered the cake or did it settle?

There are a lot of great tutorials on how to cover a cake in fondant to get rid of the "round" shape.

 

I know you said you've never had complaints on the appearance of your cakes, but if you want them to look professional, straight sides and clean lines are a huge factor in pricing and one of the first things people can look at to determine how experienced you are as a decorator. A cute cake design is one thing, but if it's bulging and leaning, the design gets lost on the fundamental problems.

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:01pm

Why would they complain....they got what they paid for. OP. the point that everyone is trying to make is they can't tell you what they would charge for THAT cake, because they wouldn't have made THAT cake. It is an adorable design and the figures are done very well. They are telling you that you could charge a lot more if you just worked on a few issues. I was always told if you want to be skinny, do what skinny people do. If you want to get premium prices for your cakes, do what the people who get those prices do. You can either allow this to hurt your feelings or use it constructively which will benefit you and your bottom line. If "good enough" is good enough for you, then you might not want to ask questions you may not like the answer too.

JujuSweetz Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:20pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by vgcea 


The quality of your work goes a long way in determining how you price. If any of the pros here did that cake they would be able to charge a higher price than you did simply because the quality of their work would be better.

Pricing a fondant cake should not be any different from pricing cake pops if you already have a solid pricing structure you were already using for the cake pops. What does it cost you to make the product (doesn't matter if it's cake pops or tiered cake)? How many labor hours are involved? What is your profit margin? It doesn't really matter what the product is, the pricing principles remain the same.

If you need basic pricing info, do a search, there are at least 2,000 threads on pricing.

I completely agree! And I am always honest with my customers and they know I am not an expert in fondant cakes yet. However, they still choose to go with my cake because they like the taste of my products, my customer service, and pricing. When it comes to fondant work, the labor hours is really what I am thinking of in regards to pricing. What is our labor hours worth, etc...Anyway, I will search through other threads on pricing.

Thanks,

Gru

JujuSweetz Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:21pm

Great links! Thank you so much!

JujuSweetz Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:25pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smckinney07 


I wasn't trying to be hurtful, as I previously stated. As Pam and V stated, your quality will effect your pricing. Also, you've been asking questions about why your cakes were under/overcooked and needing help making gumpaste figures. Some of which are very basic questions. I was merely suggesting ways you could improve your business I meant no disrespect.

I never asked questions about undercooked cakes or gumpaste! I was answering to someone else's question.

JujuSweetz Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:35pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 

Why would they complain....they got what they paid for. OP. the point that everyone is trying to make is they can't tell you what they would charge for THAT cake, because they wouldn't have made THAT cake. It is an adorable design and the figures are done very well. They are telling you that you could charge a lot more if you just worked on a few issues. I was always told if you want to be skinny, do what skinny people do. If you want to get premium prices for your cakes, do what the people who get those prices do. You can either allow this to hurt your feelings or use it constructively which will benefit you and your bottom line. If "good enough" is good enough for you, then you might not want to ask questions you may not like the answer too.

You all are absolutely rude and extremely unfriendly when you respond to your answers. I am aware of how much work I need to do to improve my cakes. I thought joining this forum was a way learn from others in an amicable way. Everyone here seems to be ready to jump on newbies like vultures. I guess this is how forums work huh. Big mistake to join this. I really have no time for this ridiculousness. 

CodyBearsMom Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:48pm

I think the design principle is cute but the overall finished product looks very amateur!! The fondant work is sloppy, the cake is uneven and overall it does't quite look right. If I was the customer I would have complained about it!! You clearly have the basic down but you still need to work on developing and honing your skills. You are a business and a professional so your work should reflect that and it does not. I also agree that you are a business but don't know how to price your product? I suspect that you are a home baker who is not legal.Your arrogance and defensiveness is astounding. Many of the members on these forums are considered the best of the best. Others are just starting out and look here for advice, suggestions and guidance!!  All the information is exchanged freely and without malice! So good luck to you and remember "The biggest room in the house is the room for improvement"!!!

Annabakescakes Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 2:51pm

ASince you don't want to know how to improve, I wont mention anything, but since I charge about the same, I would have to say your cake is way overpriced.

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 3:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by JujuSweetz 

You all are absolutely rude and extremely unfriendly when you respond to your answers. I am aware of how much work I need to do to improve my cakes. I thought joining this forum was a way learn from others in an amicable way. Everyone here seems to be ready to jump on newbies like vultures. I guess this is how forums work huh. Big mistake to join this. I really have no time for this ridiculousness. 

How am I rude when I say they got what they paid for? You were the one who thought you charged too much. And I NEVER respond to my answers just so you know. This is a great place to learn. If you are willing to take advice and not take it personally. Good luck in your future endeavors.

 

BTW...I got chewed up when I came here too. I took the advice no matter what form it came in and chose to learn from it. I'm sorry you have no time for honesty and improving yourself.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 3:38pm

Ok, Ok.  I just want to step in for a wee moment.

 

Honestly, had you been a newbie, everyone here would have told you how cute this cake is.  They would have showered you with compliments on one of your first cakes and encouraged you with some of the same constructive criticism.  

 

Because you stated you had been in business for over a year, the criticism came in a different form.  People expect more from someone in business than a hobbyist.  

 

I'm sure it wasn't easy to hear people point out the flaws in your cake, especially when what you wanted was opinions on price.  Please understand that skill level plays a huge part in pricing.  

 

There is a feeling, by some, that there is some kind of war between newbies and members of long standing.  I beg to differ.  I've been a member for awhile, and I've owned my own business for 2 years now.  I'll eagerly offer advice and assistance where I can.  However, I also think it important to be honest with people.  I try to be understanding & sympathetic while also being honest & realistic.

AZCouture Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:00pm

AWell said.

MimiFix Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:39pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by CodyBearsMom 

I think the design principle is cute but the overall finished product looks very amateur!! The fondant work is sloppy, the cake is uneven and overall it does't quite look right. If I was the customer I would have complained about it!! You clearly have the basic down but you still need to work on developing and honing your skills. You are a business and a professional so your work should reflect that and it does not. I also agree that you are a business but don't know how to price your product? I suspect that you are a home baker who is not legal.Your arrogance and defensiveness is astounding. Many of the members on these forums are considered the best of the best. Others are just starting out and look here for advice, suggestions and guidance!!  All the information is exchanged freely and without malice! So good luck to you and remember "The biggest room in the house is the room for improvement"!!!

 

Very nice, Delicious! Your comments were perfect. But CodyBearsMom, who the heck are you? Our newest or reappearing troll? You joined today and immediately jump in to inflame? Geez.

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