Cake Circles Vs Cake Boards...i'm Confused

Decorating By Nadiaa Updated 23 Aug 2013 , 1:56am by Nadiaa

Nadiaa Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:31am
post #1 of 6

Hi all :) I'm new to covering cakes with fondant, and have been reading lots of threads and tutorials and can't seem to work out one thing. People talk about cake circles and cake boards. I know a cake board is the covered presentation board you sit your cake on, but what is a cake circle? Do you put the cake on a circle of cardboard that is the same size as the cake to decorate it then move it to the cake board? If yes, then I have some other questions -


1. How do you move the cake to your cake board without squashing or denting your decorated cake? 


2. How thick does the cardboard circle need to be? 


3. How do you attach it to the cake board so it doesn't slide? 


4. Do you do this for BC cakes as well as fondant? I've never used a cake circle for my BC cakes, I've always just placed the cake on the board and decoated it there. 


Sorry for all the questions, they're just the missing pieces I can't seem to figure out! Thanks so much for your patience and help xxx

5 replies
Smckinney07 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:39am
post #2 of 6

AYes you'll have a presentation board that will need to hold the weight of the entire finished cake. Then a cake board (cake circle, same thing) that's thin like cardboard will go under each tier. You wouldn't have used them before since you hadn't done a stacked cake.

The boards under each cake tier along with your internal support system (whether you use SPS, bubble tea straws, dowels, etc) will keep your cakes from collapsing.

You attach them with your buttercream, royal icing, chocolate (some people use carpet tape).

Smckinney07 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:42am
post #3 of 6

AI missed a few questions ,the cakes being on their own boards allows you to move them in and out of the fridge or transport your tiers separately. You do need them under fondant or BC cakes. You can dent them while moving, you just slide a spatula underneath and run it around the underneath to unlock the seal (say if it's stuck to your turntable after icing) gently pick it up and gently set it down.

dynee Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:08am
post #5 of 6

Also, ya know that the cake board(circle) protects your antique serving plates from damage from a knife. When we were kids, before I knew anything about cake decorating we had a pink depression glass sunflower plate that was full of knife cuts. We used it for most of our birthday cakes for 8 children and it had little value because of the damage. I have since purchased a replacement and believe me I ALWAYS put the cake on a circle to be able to use it and not damage it.

Nadiaa Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:56am
post #6 of 6

Thankyou both so much. I have a really clear picture in my head now of the process. I didn't even think about the cake boards protecting the surface from knife damage either. I will have to try my first stacked cake soon and put all this great advice into action. Thanks again, I really appreciate the responses :)

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