Wedding Cake

Decorating By Nickithebaker Updated 17 Sep 2013 , 6:51pm by SystemMod1

buglady Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 12:29am
post #91 of 166

APractice cake --nursing home, senior citizens center, pot luck at church, day care, volunteer fire department, bingo, anywhere you would have a group of neighbors gathering for fun and fellowship. BTW you did a very nice job on your practice cakes.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 12:38am
post #92 of 166

Unless I'm working on a recipe, I use styro dummies.

Nadiaa Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 12:50am
post #93 of 166

Wow, your practice cakes look lovely. I think it's a wonderful thing you're helping out your family and making their wedding cake. I'm also glad to see you're willing to put the practice in to get it as good as possible. I'm going to get some dummy cakes I think, because I've been practising a lot too lately and I think I'll be sick if I eat any more cake! But, my kitchen does smell permanently like sugar, which I love. Lol! Keep it up and I'm loving the progress pics!

cjw Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 1:29am
post #94 of 166

I did the wedding cakes for my daughter. My prior experience with cake decorating was when they were 3 or 4 years old I made a star tip Bert & Ernie cake. They are are 31 now (twins). :)

 

We could have easily bought cakes from a bakery but my daughter asked me to make them. So I did. And she wanted rustic so I didn't have to get them smooth or use fondant.

 

I would use your test cakes to figure how how far in advance to bake them. We tasted every day to figure out when they tasted best. Ended up baking on Thursday for Saturday evening wedding. She wanted more cake than we needed and several flavors so we had red velvet, carrot, german chocolate and banana.

 

Other than the tasting suggestion, I will just wish you well! Mine did not look professional but they tasted good and my daughter was happy.

 

 

soldiernurse Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 5:49pm
post #95 of 166

AYour practice cake looks good for not having the right tools...you can easily correct the gap in the fondant by using a fondant smoother to smooth the fondant down the side of the cake..provided its not too thin on top..good for you!

Smckinney07 Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 7:26pm
post #96 of 166

AYour practice cakes turned out well! Round will be much easier and store bought Fondant will be a lot easier to use! If you didnt order a rolling pin you can use a large piece of PVC. Also, 'The Mat' I've read wonderful things about it (and bad things too) but I am planning on getting one. It's supposed to help you roll your fondant out thinner so use less and it promises other things too. I am currently using a piece of vinayl I purchased at a sewing shop, I imagine if I used two it would be similar.

Since your purchasing the roses then coloring, after you dust the roses pass them by steam from a kettle or pot of boiling water to seal in the color.

Someone mentioned being careful about the heat and filling. I always carve my cakes when they are partially frozen, much easier! Your set up system sounds great and sturdy! Fondarific will better then homemade, it's just difficult to make especially if you've never used it before, you don't know what consistency you need. It doesn't dry rock hard, as you asked, especially the brand you purchased. It sort of seals the cake, and does firm up but not anything that's going to be difficult to cut or chew. You seem to be moving on quite well. There is a big difference with the hi ratio shortening! It's not necessary for your purposes I've also used Crisco or whatever before now I just make smbc but with so much on your plate. I also recommend sugars shacks buttercream with her method. If your having a hard time getting your messages to post in time just PM (private message) one of us.

Nickithebaker Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 7:27pm
post #97 of 166

Thanks for the compliments and all of the advice, I really appreciate how people were willing to lend a hand.  I have a lot of respect for some of the pros on here, there is really some beautiful work when you start looking at photos in people profiles. 

 

I don't have a fondant smoother yet, we are in such a small town it's hard to get anything here!  I ordered a ton of stuff online yesterday.  I also got the SPS system, so hopefully I will have nice level layers that don't sink!   

 

I ordered pre-made flowers, but also got stuff to try and make some gum paste flowers. I'm excited to try that out.  Looks like it takes lots of time and practice to turn out some of the gorgeous flowers that people make.  I'll post pictures of my attempts with that. 

jennicake Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 7:32pm
post #98 of 166

AYour first attempt looks great! You're a natural, can't wait to see how the wedding cake turns out :)

Nickithebaker Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 7:37pm
post #99 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smckinney07 

Your practice cakes turned out well! Round will be much easier and store bought Fondant will be a lot easier to use! If you didnt order a rolling pin you can use a large piece of PVC. Also, 'The Mat' I've read wonderful things about it (and bad things too) but I am planning on getting one. It's supposed to help you roll your fondant out thinner so use less and it promises other things too. I am currently using a piece of vinayl I purchased at a sewing shop, I imagine if I used two it would be similar.

Since your purchasing the roses then coloring, after you dust the roses pass them by steam from a kettle or pot of boiling water to seal in the color.

Someone mentioned being careful about the heat and filling. I always carve my cakes when they are partially frozen, much easier! Your set up system sounds great and sturdy! Fondarific will better then homemade, it's just difficult to make especially if you've never used it before, you don't know what consistency you need. It doesn't dry rock hard, as you asked, especially the brand you purchased. It sort of seals the cake, and does firm up but not anything that's going to be difficult to cut or chew. You seem to be moving on quite well. There is a big difference with the hi ratio shortening! It's not necessary for your purposes I've also used Crisco or whatever before now I just make smbc but with so much on your plate. I also recommend sugars shacks buttercream with her method. If your having a hard time getting your messages to post in time just PM (private message) one of us.

 

Thanks for your help and advice! 

 

I got a 20" rolling pin, a 12" x 5" high cake turn table, the Wilton "deluxe" leveler (I know some people hate it, but I'm gonna give it a shot) 2 fondant smoothers, The Mat, a set of 5 round pans, the bake even strips, card board cake boards, a masonite circle, the Wilton gum paste student book and tool set, a rose cutter set by GSA, pre made flowers from GSA, like 10 different petal and luster dust colors,  satin ice gum paste, #20 paper covered wire, cream cheese filling from GSA,  10lbs of Fondarific, the SPS support system,  and probably some other stuff too, but it's slipped my mind at the moment.  Am I missing anything?  

 

I have a bench scraper, piping bags and tips, the long frosting knife (don't know the technical name) and also can use my hubbies dry wall knife if I need a bigger bench scraper (don't worry... I'll wash it first)  

 

Anyone know if the Henry & Henry cream cheese filling is shelf stable?  I would guess it is, since I know you can make a shelf stable cream cheese icing.  http://www.globalsugarart.com/cream-cheese-filling-by-henry-henry-p-20411.html  Web site doesn't say.  

savannahquinn Posted 26 Aug 2013 , 1:17am
post #100 of 166

I agree with previous poster, fondarific  fondant is what I use for cakes that need to be pristine.  Good luck I think it will turn out great!

lolarx8 Posted 28 Aug 2013 , 2:28pm
post #101 of 166

I admire your perseverence. Keep it up!

BatterUpCake Posted 28 Aug 2013 , 2:38pm
post #102 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickithebaker 

 

Thanks for your help and advice! 

 

I got a 20" rolling pin, a 12" x 5" high cake turn table, the Wilton "deluxe" leveler (I know some people hate it, but I'm gonna give it a shot) 2 fondant smoothers, The Mat, a set of 5 round pans, the bake even strips, card board cake boards, a masonite circle, the Wilton gum paste student book and tool set, a rose cutter set by GSA, pre made flowers from GSA, like 10 different petal and luster dust colors,  satin ice gum paste, #20 paper covered wire, cream cheese filling from GSA,  10lbs of Fondarific, the SPS support system,  and probably some other stuff too, but it's slipped my mind at the moment.  Am I missing anything?  

 

I have a bench scraper, piping bags and tips, the long frosting knife (don't know the technical name) and also can use my hubbies dry wall knife if I need a bigger bench scraper (don't worry... I'll wash it first)  

 

Anyone know if the Henry & Henry cream cheese filling is shelf stable?  I would guess it is, since I know you can make a shelf stable cream cheese icing.  http://www.globalsugarart.com/cream-cheese-filling-by-henry-henry-p-20411.html  Web site doesn't say.  

Sounds like a fun shopping trip!

soldiernurse Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 3:25pm
post #103 of 166

any updates??detective.gif

DebbyJG Posted 30 Aug 2013 , 5:45pm
post #104 of 166

AIf you are using real cream cheese in the filling, I would leave the cake in the fridge until about an hour before serving. Cream cheese and September outdoors are not a good combination....

Nickithebaker Posted 1 Sep 2013 , 11:13pm
post #105 of 166

I finished my practice cake, and did a little bit of piping on it.  I think it turned out ok.  I'm in Hawaii until the 10th, so I'll start working on stuff when I get back :) 

soldiernurse Posted 1 Sep 2013 , 11:19pm
post #106 of 166

AHave fun! Can't wait to see it!

AZCouture Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 9:00pm
post #107 of 166

ATomorrow is the big day....how's it going?

BatterUpCake Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 9:31pm
post #108 of 166

Can't wait to see pictures....

Nadiaa Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 10:28pm
post #109 of 166

Me too! I've been following this thread. Remember there are some professional bakers watching this thread so if you need help just ask xxx I hope it's going wonderfully. 

carmijok Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 11:06pm
post #110 of 166

Quote:

Originally Posted by DebbyJG 

If you are using real cream cheese in the filling, I would leave the cake in the fridge until about an hour before serving. Cream cheese and September outdoors are not a good combination....

I really wish people would quit worrying that a cream cheese based ANYTHING will suddenly turn and go bad within a few hours.  It won't.  Especially when there is sugar involved as it's a pretty good preservative.  If it did, I couldn't let my cream cheese soften before creaming it with the softened butter for my frosting!

 

Plus you don't want your cake to be served cold as it can have a tendency to taste dry--especially if there's butter involved because butter is hard when cold.  If you have a strong enough dam of buttercream holding the filling in you won't have to worry about 'slippage' either as cream cheese filling is pretty soft...and if it's covered with fondant, you shouldn't have those issues anyway.

 

Refrigerate, yes-- but deliver it an hour before an event starts so it will come to room temp over several hours before serving.  Fondant if it's cold can have condensation when taken out to warm temps, but it will dry if left alone (and it's not real humid). 

 

And that Henry and Henry stuff is not refrigerated in the sleeve so yes...it's pretty shelf stable. 

BatterUpCake Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 11:09pm
post #111 of 166

I think one of the big reasons people think that is because the cottage food law does not label it as shelf stable and doesn't allow it to be sold from home based bakeries.

cakealicious7 Posted 13 Sep 2013 , 11:22pm
post #112 of 166

AWoooow!!!!! This thread has been riveting!!!! I cant wait to see how everything turns out!

AZCouture Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 12:02am
post #113 of 166

AOh I know, like the cream cheese is going to instantly become poisonous. I'm a bit hyper about spoilage and safety myself, but a cream cheese filled cake is fine for a good amount of time out of refrigeration. It stays at a cool temp for longer than you think.

AZCouture Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 12:04am
post #114 of 166

AI don't even want to think about what shelf stable cream cheese "stuff" is like. Makes me shiver.

smittyditty Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 12:25am
post #115 of 166

Quote:

Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 
 

I think one of the big reasons people think that is because the cottage food law does not label it as shelf stable and doesn't allow it to be sold from home based bakeries.

Just so you know.. in Tx you can sell cream cheese cakes just not Cheese cakes.

http://www.texascottagefoodlaw.com/Resources/Recipes/TraditionalCreamCheeseFrosting.aspx

 

This website someone gave me has recipes tested that will not spoil 3 of which are cream cheese.

I just took the food handler cottage permit portion that is voluntary and the spoilage occurs due to water. If there is enough sugar it stabilizes the perishables.

cheeseball Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 3:24am
post #116 of 166

I don't know how I missed this saga...must have been under a rock or something.  I've been forced into a caking break by some pretty heinous flooding, so Nicki, if you need a last minute assist, I'm up late and available most of tomorrow.  From what I've seen so far though, methinks you're going to rock this;-)

DebbyJG Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 5:15pm
post #117 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok 
 

I really wish people would quit worrying that a cream cheese based ANYTHING will suddenly turn and go bad within a few hours.  It won't.  Especially when there is sugar involved as it's a pretty good preservative.  If it did, I couldn't let my cream cheese soften before creaming it with the softened butter for my frosting!

 

Plus you don't want your cake to be served cold as it can have a tendency to taste dry--especially if there's butter involved because butter is hard when cold.  If you have a strong enough dam of buttercream holding the filling in you won't have to worry about 'slippage' either as cream cheese filling is pretty soft...and if it's covered with fondant, you shouldn't have those issues anyway.

 

Refrigerate, yes-- but deliver it an hour before an event starts so it will come to room temp over several hours before serving.  Fondant if it's cold can have condensation when taken out to warm temps, but it will dry if left alone (and it's not real humid). 

 

And that Henry and Henry stuff is not refrigerated in the sleeve so yes...it's pretty shelf stable. 

 

Filling or frosting made with real cream cheese, out of the fridge for a few hours in a comfortable air conditioned room, no problem.

 

Filling or frosting made with real cream cheese, sitting outside in the sun on a day in September that could be, as it was here two days ago, 95 degrees? Thanks but I'll pass on having a piece of that cake.

 

Shelf stable cream cheese from a sleeve? No.

BatterUpCake Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 5:27pm
post #118 of 166

when I said shelf stable I meant NHFP...my bad

smittyditty Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 11:01pm
post #119 of 166

Quote:

Originally Posted by DebbyJG 
 

 

Filling or frosting made with real cream cheese, out of the fridge for a few hours in a comfortable air conditioned room, no problem.

 

Filling or frosting made with real cream cheese, sitting outside in the sun on a day in September that could be, as it was here two days ago, 95 degrees? Thanks but I'll pass on having a piece of that cake.

 

Shelf stable cream cheese from a sleeve? No.

YUP

carmijok Posted 14 Sep 2013 , 11:42pm
post #120 of 166

A

Original message sent by DebbyJG

Filling or frosting made with real cream cheese, out of the fridge for a few hours in a comfortable air conditioned room, no problem.

Filling or frosting made with real cream cheese, sitting outside in the sun on a day in September that could be, as it was here two days ago, 95 degrees? Thanks but I'll pass on having a piece of that cake.

Shelf stable cream cheese from a sleeve? No.

What is the difference between a cake with real cream cheese filling ( that hopefully was cold when delivered but was allowed to come to room temp over time), and a cream cheese cheeseball outside for hours on a buffet table? I personally don't like the thought of any cake outside simply because it could melt or attract bugs...but worrying about a cream cheese filling is the least of it.

Henry and Henry's cream cheese filling in a sleeve is like all their other fillings such as the Bavarian creams...but I have no idea what it tastes like. So far I only like their raspberry. But it is shelf stable for all those who are worried about it. I'll stick to making the real thing.

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