Wedding Cake

Decorating By Nickithebaker Updated 17 Sep 2013 , 6:51pm by SystemMod1

MeghanKelly Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 3:45pm
post #61 of 166

I'm a home baker too, and I come here for advice often, but I don't come in announcing to professional bakers that I'm doing my first cake and it's a wedding cake and I've only ever worked with a star tip.  You ask professionals for advice, you should be prepared to accept their advice.  Maybe the bride & groom have difficult circumstances where getting a bakery-cake isn't possible, but I think you should still be prepared for backlash if your cake isn't 100% perfect to the bride's (and family's) standards.  I don't think anyone here was being rude to you. 

 

That said, I think you should do several practice runs with dummies or even real cake.  I don't think it's impossible for you to pull this off.  But it is probably more work than you think.

sixinarow Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 3:52pm
post #62 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickithebaker 

CC has been holding my posts for moderation, so I'm not sure when this will show up.

 

 

Yesterday I used the Red Velvet recipe and halved it.  I made two 9 x 13 cakes and 2 8 x 8 cakes in a brownie pan.    Needless to say they didn't have sharp edges.. 

 

I also had a hard time leveling them.  I didn't have a long serrated knife, and since I'm going to order a cake leveler online didn't want to buy one.  So I tried to use a chef knife... didn't work to well.  A small steak knife was slightly better.    

 

I had a huge problem with the cake being crumbly while trying to level.  Is this normal?  Should I bake it longer? 

 

I made the "crusting butter cream" - I didn't have hi-yield shortening so I used Crisco.  The icing didn't turn out well.. was this due to not using the proper shortening?  I did end up doing the crumb coat with it though.   I had to keep dipping my butter knife (couldn't find my frosting knife and the store was closed icon_sad.gif)  in hot water to get the icing to stick to the cake and spread. 

 

I made Wilton butter cream since I am familiar with that and know it turns out well.  I used that to fill and level the cakes.   I am shocked at the amount of icing I needed to make these cakes level and square-ish!!  I think I used 5 2lb bags of PS yesterday.  

 

Our store didn't have any fondant (out for 2 weeks!) so I made MMF with a recipe I found here.  I hope I did it right.    

 

Right now I have to finish the larger cake, I'm having a hard time with the corners.  I'm using a spatula and a bench scraper.  My husband is a contractor and quite good with drywall... so he came along and showed me how to get better results.   haha.  

 

I don't think I'm going to make a square cake.  It's to much work and it takes to long.  Corners are hard.  

 

 

 Here are a few pictures... I will get back to you guys after I have tried the fondant.   

 

 

I have to order everything online - and I need to do this today.  Can someone please recommend the easiest to use fondant? 

You need to buy high-ratio shortening, (not Crisco) either at a cake supply store or online. Marshmallow fondant will not hold up well in heat and humidity, I can't remember if you said that you were going to be purchasing fondant online or not, but I wouldn't use it for a cake that is going to be at an outdoor reception in September. It's fine to practice with, just make sure you give yourself at least one small trial cake to cover with the fondant you will actually be using. There are a lot of differences in the stretch of different brands/types of fondant.

It takes a lot of product to do a cake well, which it why the cost is probably going to be significant for you. A lot of the supplies you're purchasing, you'll get a lot of good use out of. I would try a different buttercream recipe, IMHO, wilton's sucks. Look up Buttercream dream in the recipe section, it is a straight forward, easy recipe. Did you let your cakes cool before leveling? I like to tort and level mine when they are still cold (not frozen, but coming to room temp).

I'm glad you're practicing, keep asking questions!

Nickithebaker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:03pm
post #63 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by sixinarow 

You need to buy high-ratio shortening, (not Crisco) either at a cake supply store or online. Marshmallow fondant will not hold up well in heat and humidity, I can't remember if you said that you were going to be purchasing fondant online or not, but I wouldn't use it for a cake that is going to be at an outdoor reception in September. It's fine to practice with, just make sure you give yourself at least one small trial cake to cover with the fondant you will actually be using. There are a lot of differences in the stretch of different brands/types of fondant.

It takes a lot of product to do a cake well, which it why the cost is probably going to be significant for you. A lot of the supplies you're purchasing, you'll get a lot of good use out of. I would try a different buttercream recipe, IMHO, wilton's sucks. Look up Buttercream dream in the recipe section, it is a straight forward, easy recipe. Did you let your cakes cool before leveling? I like to tort and level mine when they are still cold (not frozen, but coming to room temp).

I'm glad you're practicing, keep asking questions!

I'm not going to use MMF for the actual cake - I was going to buy 10lbs of Satin Ice.   The cost of this project is not a factor,    I'm expecting to have $400 - $500 into this by the time I'm done.  

 

I did let them cool - they sat on the counter in the AC for about  4 hours before I did anything to them.  Should I stick them in the freezer for 20 mins next time before I level? 

 

What brand of fondant would you recommend? 

DeliciousDesserts Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:07pm
post #64 of 166

AI personally think fondarific is the easiest for covering cakes. It's very flexible & doesn't tear easily. It's Very forgiving.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:08pm
post #65 of 166

AWow. Knowing this is your first & the lack of good tools, that is really an awesome job. Seriously.

vgcea Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:10pm
post #66 of 166

AWHAT is that under the cake? Did you buy cake boards or make yours? I'm on my phone so I can't see the details of your photo from the phone.

You say you expect to spend $400-500 on this cake? Why not invest that in getting them a beautiful cake from a professional even if it means ordering from the next town?

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:11pm
post #67 of 166

Actually your square cake doesn't look too bad. Buttercream dream is really good. Whip it a lot for a really smooth consistency. I am glad you decided to go with round. Not sure what cake leveler you ordered but most of them are a waste of money. I get my cakes VERY cold but not quite frozen before leveling. I would personally use the red velvet WASC recipe for a really firm cake for stacking. Below is Mac's Mom's recipe but I just use Red Velvet mix instead of the white and chocolate and leave out the red dye. It is a foolproof recipe and is always moist

 

Here is Macsmom Red Velvet, it can be found in this document https://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs.
Red Velvet Cake - MacsMom *If you don't have 100 mouths to feed, lol, just use 1 box white and measure out 1/2 of the chocolate cake mix, and obviously use half of all the other ingredients.
2 boxes white cake mix
1 box dark chocolate cake mix
2 pkg chocolate pudding
2 teaspoons salt
3 c flour
3 c sugar
3 c sour cream
3 cups vanilla coffee creamer
1 cup water
1/3 c oil
9 eggs
2 tablespoons butter flavoring
2 (1oz) jars Wilton red-red

sixinarow Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:23pm
post #68 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickithebaker 

I'm not going to use MMF for the actual cake - I was going to buy 10lbs of Satin Ice.   The cost of this project is not a factor,    I'm expecting to have $400 - $500 into this by the time I'm done.  

 

I did let them cool - they sat on the counter in the AC for about  4 hours before I did anything to them.  Should I stick them in the freezer for 20 mins next time before I level? 

 

What brand of fondant would you recommend? 

I bake and let them cool, then I double wrap in saran wrap and a layer of foil and let them sit in the freezer at least 2 hours (usually overnight).  I pull them out and unwrap, let them thaw while I make the buttercream, next, level and tort while they are still cold but not frozen. I think they're easier to tort and level that way. I usually make my own fondant, so I would defer to Delicious Desserts and go with Fondarific, the only pre-made fondant I've used is Pettinice, and I wasn't thrilled with it, it was way to soft for my liking.

Make sure to use a really stiff buttercream dam with 1/2" space to the edge.(I use a totally different recipe for my dam than filling), fill your cakes, wrap loosely in syran wrap and place a tile or book on top of them for a couple hours. This will help them settle, the dam will "squish" to the edge of the cake, if it squishes out, you cake take care of it with the crumb coat. That way, you won't have bulges under your fondant. Fondant can be tricky, but if your cake is prepped right and you take your time and lift the edges as you smooth, you'll get a much better result.

Hope that makes sense! :)

darkchocolate Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:24pm
post #69 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickithebaker 

CC has been holding my posts for moderation, so I'm not sure when this will show up.

 

 

Yesterday I used the Red Velvet recipe and halved it.  I made two 9 x 13 cakes and 2 8 x 8 cakes in a brownie pan.    Needless to say they didn't have sharp edges.. 

 

I also had a hard time leveling them.  I didn't have a long serrated knife, and since I'm going to order a cake leveler online didn't want to buy one.  So I tried to use a chef knife... didn't work to well.  A small steak knife was slightly better.    

 

I had a huge problem with the cake being crumbly while trying to level.  Is this normal?  Should I bake it longer? 

 

I made the "crusting butter cream" - I didn't have hi-yield shortening so I used Crisco.  The icing didn't turn out well.. was this due to not using the proper shortening?  I did end up doing the crumb coat with it though.   I had to keep dipping my butter knife (couldn't find my frosting knife and the store was closed icon_sad.gif)  in hot water to get the icing to stick to the cake and spread. 

 

I made Wilton butter cream since I am familiar with that and know it turns out well.  I used that to fill and level the cakes.   I am shocked at the amount of icing I needed to make these cakes level and square-ish!!  I think I used 5 2lb bags of PS yesterday.  

 

Our store didn't have any fondant (out for 2 weeks!) so I made MMF with a recipe I found here.  I hope I did it right.    

 

Right now I have to finish the larger cake, I'm having a hard time with the corners.  I'm using a spatula and a bench scraper.  My husband is a contractor and quite good with drywall... so he came along and showed me how to get better results.   haha.  

 

I don't think I'm going to make a square cake.  It's to much work and it takes to long.  Corners are hard.  

 

 

 Here are a few pictures... I will get back to you guys after I have tried the fondant.   

 

 

I have to order everything online - and I need to do this today.  Can someone please recommend the easiest to use fondant? 

For a first timer, the cake on the right has some nice corners.  I agree they are hard though, I can't do it.

soldiernurse Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:31pm
post #70 of 166

A.....with not having the right tools, I think you are doing well...imagine what you can do with all the right tools!:D

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:37pm
post #71 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by vgcea 

WHAT is that under the cake? Did you buy cake boards or make yours? I'm on my phone so I can't see the details of your photo from the phone.

You say you expect to spend $400-500 on this cake? Why not invest that in getting them a beautiful cake from a professional even if it means ordering from the next town?

This is just a practice cake. Make sure you do get something sturdy enough to hold the weight of the cake asa cake board...I have seen people use thin plywood covered in floral paper, or Styrofoam. Or purchase a sturdy cake drum.

Nickithebaker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:40pm
post #72 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by vgcea 

WHAT is that under the cake? Did you buy cake boards or make yours? I'm on my phone so I can't see the details of your photo from the phone.

You say you expect to spend $400-500 on this cake? Why not invest that in getting them a beautiful cake from a professional even if it means ordering from the next town?

 

It's cardboard that I cut and wrapped with parchment paper.  Couldn't find any cake boards in town.  

 

 

Because I enjoy doing this - money isn't an issue - it provide me with an excuse to add to my collection of cake stuff.  

 

And, because it's for my family and I want to. 

Nickithebaker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:43pm
post #73 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 

Actually your square cake doesn't look too bad. Buttercream dream is really good. Whip it a lot for a really smooth consistency. I am glad you decided to go with round. Not sure what cake leveler you ordered but most of them are a waste of money. I get my cakes VERY cold but not quite frozen before leveling. I would personally use the red velvet WASC recipe for a really firm cake for stacking. Below is Mac's Mom's recipe but I just use Red Velvet mix instead of the white and chocolate and leave out the red dye. It is a foolproof recipe and is always moist

 

Here is Macsmom Red Velvet, it can be found in this document https://docs.google.com/Doc?id=df4f9hbq_46cs9f28fs.
Red Velvet Cake - MacsMom *If you don't have 100 mouths to feed, lol, just use 1 box white and measure out 1/2 of the chocolate cake mix, and obviously use half of all the other ingredients.
2 boxes white cake mix
1 box dark chocolate cake mix
2 pkg chocolate pudding
2 teaspoons salt
3 c flour
3 c sugar
3 c sour cream
3 cups vanilla coffee creamer
1 cup water
1/3 c oil
9 eggs
2 tablespoons butter flavoring
2 (1oz) jars Wilton red-red

This is the recipe that I used.   I halved it and it almost to much for my kitchen aid!   I'm kinda afraid to go with a different icing since the last one I tried was a failure.  What don't people like about the Wilton BC? 

Nickithebaker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:46pm
post #74 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 

This is just a practice cake. Make sure you do get something sturdy enough to hold the weight of the cake asa cake board...I have seen people use thin plywood covered in floral paper, or Styrofoam. Or purchase a sturdy cake drum.

 

 

I'm not longer making a square cake - to much work.  Going with round.  I'm going to use cake boards under each tier and put the whole thing on a 1/2" plywood circle I'll have the hubby cut and I'll wrap with a coordinating foil.   The bottom layer will be on 1/2 foam board and won't touch whatever is on the plywood.  

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:50pm
post #75 of 166

good job...

kakeladi Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 5:29pm
post #76 of 166

.......I made the "crusting butter cream" - I didn't have hi-yield shortening so I used Crisco.  The icing didn't turn out well.. was this due to not using the proper shortening?  I did end up doing the crumb coat with it though.   I had to keep dipping my butter knife (couldn't find my frosting knife and the store was closed icon_sad.gif)  in hot water to get the icing to stick to the cake and spread. ........

 

Most buttercream recipes - *especially Wilton's* tell you to mix just a minute or two BUT......you will be far better off mixing it on low for up to 10 minutes!  Yes, that long will result in a smooth, easy to work with icing.   One other tip is to use a bowl that is deep and narrow so the beaters are burried in the icing. 

What mixer are you using?  Hand held or KitchenAid or something different?

 

Many (most in my opinion) don't really need Hi-ratio shorting.  I have always used Crisco - yes even since the transfat has been removed with good results.  Remember, everyone's taste buds are different.  What one person thinks is hot/spicy is mild to another. 

Here's a link to a great, easy to use icing recipe:  http://cakecentral.com/a/2-icing

The other thing about making b'cream is most recipes are *very* short on flavoring.   Which ever recipe you end up sing at lest double the flavoring and you will improve the taste about 100% :)

 

For a practice cake & your skill level you did *great!*.  Rather glad to hear you are going to change to rounds.  I think in the long run you will be much happier working with them and will use them much more often in the future:)

Norasmom Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 5:38pm
post #77 of 166

I am glad you are doing a round cake! With your bench scraper and a turntable, you will be amazed how much easier it will be to ice.  Small mistakes, lumps, bumps can be covered with flowers and creative piping.

 

Don't forget to use bake even strips so you don't have to level your cake!  I NEVER level my cakes anymore, b/c I'm not good at it either.  You can make your own by cutting towels into 2" strips, dampening them, and fastening them around the cake pan with pins before you put the cake in the oven.

 

I recommend you make Sugarshack's buttercream following her exact directions.  It makes a large volume of icing, but you need that much.  Sugarshack's buttercream is super smooth, whereas Wilton's recipe tends to not be as smooth.   

 

I never use high ratio shortening, it's too expensive with shipping.  What I do, though is instead of 5c. of shortening in the Sugarshack recipe, I use 2.5 c. unsalted butter and 2.5 c. shortening.  It's really important to use the paddle attachment, so as not to have air bubbles.

 

I don't make wedding cakes for the public, but if my cousin asked me I definitely would!  

 

I can't wait to see how it turns out.  I love a good success story.

KatieKake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:05pm
post #78 of 166

your corners look pretty good, maybe your husband should do a tutorial for everyone on square corners.  Glad to see  your doing a practice cake and are willing to change your plans, square to round,  I think you will find round easier.  Once you get the  fondant on you will be a good shape with your premade flowers, a good decision.  by the way. I think you just might pull this off.  Good lucka

Nickithebaker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:14pm
post #79 of 166

I had to make MMF and I'm trying to put it on my 8 x 8 cake, I'm having a heck of a time.  It's fairly sticky - I have powder sugar on the counter, but when I roll it out it's still sticking.  I kept picking it up and moving it and adding more sugar, but that didn't seem to be working, it also kept tearing. 

 

 So I greased the heck out of my counter and rolling pin.  That worked better but I kept getting tears.  I thought I had it good enough - so I stuck it on the cake.  It looked like crap and started tearing so I took it off.  

 

Did I roll it to thin?  I'm using a super crappy rolling pin that is leaving roll marks everywhere too.  I don't have another one to use right now... 

soldiernurse Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:25pm
post #80 of 166

ATry adding more powdered sugar until it is no longer sticky.....I know it seems like a lot of sugar, but trust me, it's necessary..youll know when to stop..if though, you add too much, it will crack..just add more shortening and knead it into the fondant..you may have to go back and forth until you get it..just be patient. Grease evrything you use, counter, inside of the bowl, hands, stirring spoon. Hth, it works for me but there are more experienced bakers on here.

darkchocolate Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:31pm
post #81 of 166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nickithebaker 

I had to make MMF and I'm trying to put it on my 8 x 8 cake, I'm having a heck of a time.  It's fairly sticky - I have powder sugar on the counter, but when I roll it out it's still sticking.  I kept picking it up and moving it and adding more sugar, but that didn't seem to be working, it also kept tearing. 

 

 So I greased the heck out of my counter and rolling pin.  That worked better but I kept getting tears.  I thought I had it good enough - so I stuck it on the cake.  It looked like crap and started tearing so I took it off.  

 

Did I roll it to thin?  I'm using a super crappy rolling pin that is leaving roll marks everywhere too.  I don't have another one to use right now... 

I added some glycerin to my MMF and I was very happy with the results/pliability of the MMF.

soldiernurse Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:37pm
post #82 of 166

AForgot about the glycerin....watch Edna DeLaCruz's tutorial....that's what I use. Its awesome!

mermaidcakery Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 8:12pm
post #83 of 166

AI agree with batterup, the Wilton leveler is a waste of money. I am a hobby baker with about as much experience as you( 2 Wilton classes, a few cakes for family). My DH got me the deluxe leveler, and it was nearly impossible to use. The blade flexes too much, and you don't get a level surface. I went back to my big bread knife, and marked a level to cut with toothpicks. Side note, all of the people on this site are so generous. Despite the monumental task the op has taken on, you all have tried to help her in every way possible, with great advice and constructive doses of reality.

darkchocolate Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 8:17pm
post #84 of 166

http://www.agbayproducts.com/products.html

 

Since money and buying what you need doesn't seem to be a problem, I would consider getting an Agbay leveler.  I just bought the Jr. Single Blade for $125 and I used it this past week and loved it.

Lfredden Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 8:26pm
post #85 of 166

AWhen I practiced covering my first cake in fondant I made my own mmf and found it difficult to work with, but when I used the store bought stuff for the first time it was a lot easier. I think practicing with something more difficult to work with will help hone your skills so that when you use the store bought stuff its a lot easier. If you use satin ice, make sure you knead it at least five minutes, otherwise it won't be very elastic (learned that the hard way).

I also purchased the Well-Decorated Cake by Toba Garrett. It gives you step by step instruction on torting, crumb coating, spackling, applying fondant as well as stacking. It also gives you a list of all the tools you will need. I like the book a lot, its like being in one of her classes.

milkmaid42 Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 8:42pm
post #86 of 166

I am almost hesitant to come back on here for my first comment wasn't too kind. I wasn't intending to sound rude, but I truly thought the OP was joking.

 

I commend you for taking on such a task of love. Like you, if it's family I'll do nearly anything.

 

I know that you are working with and tweaking your MMF recipe and I hope you are successful. If you plan on doing more fondant cakes and don't want to go the expense of buying commercial, (shipping alone costs me a fortune), you might want to give Michele Foster's Fondant a try, it is MFF, not to be confused with MMF.  (I make the updated recipe found in the recipe section that uses 2T glycerine, etc.) I've tried many commercial brands and several variations of MMF, but have not found any that taste as delicious and as easy to work with as MFF. I use the white chocolate version, (which gives it a real malleability), and I flavor it with vanilla and Lorann's cheesecake flavoring. It has many who used to pull the fondant off, into those who pull the fondant off-----to eat first!

 

Also, if you plan on doing many fondant cakes, I might recommend your investing in The Matt by Sweetwise. It eliminates the need for shortening or powdered sugar on your counter, keeps the fondant clean, prevents it from drying out if you are interrupted, and makes application a breeze, not to mention that it is food safe. There are mixed reviews on it here on CC, but I couldn't live without mine. Sweetwise has a good video on its use and care.

 

Now that I've dismounted from my soapbox, I just want to tell you that I truly wish you good luck. I hope that your love of baking and desire to learn take you far and that we will see many more of your posts and successes. You have a good attitude and lots of helpful advice.

 

Jan

soldiernurse Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 9:15pm
post #87 of 166

A

Original message sent by milkmaid42

I am almost hesitant to come back on here for my first comment wasn't too kind. I wasn't intending to sound rude, but I truly thought the OP was joking.

I commend you for taking on such a task of love. Like you, if it's family I'll do nearly anything.

I know that you are working with and tweaking your MMF recipe and I hope you are successful. If you plan on doing more fondant cakes and don't want to go the expense of buying commercial, (shipping alone costs me a fortune), you might want to give [U]M[/U]ichele [U]F[/U]oster's [U]F[/U]ondant a try, it is MFF, not to be confused with MMF.  (I make the updated recipe found in the recipe section that uses 2T glycerine, etc.) I've tried many commercial brands and several variations of MMF, but have not found any that taste as delicious and as easy to work with as MFF. I use the white chocolate version, (which gives it a real malleability), and I flavor it with vanilla and Lorann's cheesecake flavoring. It has many who used to pull the fondant off, into those who pull the fondant off-----to eat first!

Also, if you plan on doing many fondant cakes, I might recommend your investing in The Matt by Sweetwise. It eliminates the need for shortening or powdered sugar on your counter, keeps the fondant clean, prevents it from drying out if you are interrupted, and makes application a breeze, not to mention that it is food safe. There are mixed reviews on it here on CC, but I couldn't live without mine. Sweetwise has a good video on its use and care.

Now that I've dismounted from my soapbox, I just want to tell you that I truly wish you good luck. I hope that your love of baking and desire to learn take you far and that we will see many more of your posts and successes. You have a good attitude and lots of helpful advice.

Jan

MFF sounds good...I think I'll give it a go. Still learning..

Nickithebaker Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 11:31pm
post #88 of 166

I got the fondant on the small cake, no problemo.  Didn't quite have enough to do the large cake and didn't feel like making another batch... soo.. it's half covered icon_redface.gif

 

My computer is being odd and therefore won't read my memory card... so no pictures of my nice edges before the fondant went on.  

 

Here's the fondant: (BTW I did it without a fondant smoother - waiting on that to arrive) 

 

 

 

I got everything ordered -- $400 later.   I got Fondarific instead of Satin Ice - read a few threads on how much better it is.  

 

So, to update everyone I will be making a 10", 8" & 6" round red velvet cake filled with cream cheese filling.   I ordered pre made roses and we will color them to get the look we want.  

 

This is what we are hoping to achieve:  

 

 

 

What in the world do you guys do with your practice cakes?  We can't eat that much cake and I would hate to throw it away.  Don't have freezer space for it either. 

 

 

Thanks to everyone who had words of encouragement and advice.  

Lfredden Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 11:40pm
post #89 of 166

AHusband takes it to work, I take it to work, share with friends, relatives, neighbors. Make lots of friends. You did very well, you're on the right track! Make sure you position your tiers so the roses hide the worse looking areas, if you have any that is.

BatterUpCake Posted 25 Aug 2013 , 12:11am
post #90 of 166

Be careful with cream cheese if it will be in the heat

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