Nickithebaker Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 3:16pm
post #1 of

I am a home baker, I have decorated a few Wilton shaped cakes for birthday parties.  My family raves about these, so I was asked to do a wedding cake! (anyone can decorate a cake with a star tip and drop flowers!!)   HELP!! icon_eek.gif   The wedding is 9/14 

 

I feel like I can do this, with the right direction.  

 

The bride wants a square stacked cake covered with white fondant.   She wants roses on the cake as decorations.  Pretty simple I think... 

 

I have never worked with fondant, so I have been Googleing and watching YouTube videos... but I need some live feedback! 

 

I am going to purchase a Magic Line square cake pan set.   I think I'm going to do a 12", 10" and 8".  

 

I know I need a support - should I use cardboard or the foam core?  I am seeing debates going both ways.   I am shopping at www.globalsugarart.com  and www.sweetwise.com  ... found both of them through YouTube. 

 

Oh - here is a big factor - The wedding venue is 60 miles up a winding, BUMPY country road.  Do I assemble the cake at home and drive it up there?   I also have the option of making the whole thing at the venue - there will be a full kitchen, but no internet if I need last minute YouTube help.  

 

I need to buy almost everything... the only things I have are some Wilton tips and a pastry bag. 

 

Can anyone recommend tools?

 

I think I want a cake stand spinner thing,  I need a smoother tool for the fondant, I don't know WHAT I need to make the roses.   I saw a video where a lady had some kind of foam thing that she used to make the petals look real.  Don't know what it's called.  I'm guessing I need a rolling pin, do I need a mat or a board?   What about food coloring for the fondant / gumpaste flowers? Her colors are hot pink and blue.  What about a leveler? I don't trust my self to cut the tops of the cakes level.  Long spatula things?   

 

 

How much fondant do I need?  What is a good brand? 

 

Thank you sooo much!! 

165 replies
soldiernurse Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 11:31pm
post #2 of

AOk CC pros!! Help her! I'm a newbie and my advice would be minimal compared to what you pros can offer.

LeeBD Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 11:32pm
post #3 of

I don't want to sound like a Debbie Downer, but I don't think you are quite ready to take on a wedding cake.  Especially if you have never worked with fondant before.  Also, square cakes are a bit more difficult to cover than round.  Sorry to say but I think you may be in way over your head.

jennicake Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 11:45pm
post #4 of

Eek.  I agree with Lee.  I made a wedding cake for some friends shortly after I first started decorating.  They saw some of the things I had made previously and asked me to make their cake.  So, as a gift, I did.

 

It was a square cake as well, with the same size tiers (i had another tier on top as well).  Even though I already knew what to do in terms of levelling a cake, covering with fondant, stacking, and transporting on a 2 hour drive... I STILL struggled with it every step of the way.  What I wasn't prepared for was the sheer amount of work it took to put everything together.  I'm talking about days with zero sleep and extremely high levels of stress because this was for someone's wedding.  In the end, it did come together ok (though it still wasnt what the bride or myself had originally envisioned) but it was an experience I would never wish on anyone.  I didn't touch another cake for a year after that.

 

Anyways, my point is... even though I knew what needed to be done and how to do it, I still had trouble.  You are starting from a level where you haven't had the experience with all the things that you will need to do (level, fondant cover, stack, etc) and it's going to be that much harder for you.  You need to ask yourself if the stress is worth it, and if the bride/groom will be understanding if it doesn't work out or if it's going to majorly affect their day.  

 

If you are determined to do this though, give yourself a trial run.  Make the entire cake this weekend and see how long it takes you and if it can be done.  If it works out for you, then great!  If not, you are saving yourself some sleepless nights worrying about ruining someone's wedding.  Again, just speaking from personal experience here.  

KatieKake Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:00am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeeBD View Post

I don't want to sound like a Debbie Downer, but I don't think you are quite ready to take on a wedding cake.  Especially if you have never worked with fondant before.  Also, square cakes are a bit more difficult to cover than round.  Sorry to say but I think you may be in way over your head.

I agree you are not ready for this, but if you do decide to tackle it, either go to the library, or a book store and get a good  book  or several with lots of pictures,  keep your computer on so you can refer to that also, buy your fondant, a mat to roll it on, an 18" rolling pin, the SPS system, for support, Spend the the next week practicing, on rolling your fondant, and putting it on a cake, or better yet a dummy  so you  can do it again and again, until you know how to do it. Order your roses from any of the web sites that sell them, google it and I am sure you can find a place to purchase them. Buying your flowers will make things a lot easier, and you will not have to worry about making them.  That takes a lot of practice also.  Good luck

vgcea Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:06am
post #6 of

ACostumeczar would be SO proud!

Smckinney07 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:11am
post #7 of

AThis is a BIG project! Yes, yes, yes to all of the above statements! You must make the bride and groom aware of your skill level. Try a practice cake this weekend just baking, icing, and stacking. If you are still determined to continue I will advise you, only you can gauge your level but it is much harder then it looks!

If you have never worked with fondant I would recommend covering in BC. Square cakes are trickier then rounds, especially when it comes to covering with fondant. I would buy the roses premade, I know decorators that have been doing this for years and still cannot make a nice Gumpaste flower. If you are cascading or whatever you'll need a lot of roses.

You should buy SPS (and all other supplies ASAP). Sps is Single Plate Separator System-there's a video on YouTube that you should watch it will show you how it works. It's inexpensive and very durable, they come with dowels too which will keep the layers supported (this will keep the cake staying upright). You also need cardboard cake circles, foamcore, or some other grease proof plate to go under each tier (personally I use foamcore as long as its grease proof you'll be fine).

Each tier should consist of a couple layers; cake board, dab of icing, cake, filling, cake, crumb coat and ice each tier should be at least 4" tall and level!

Again, not to be mean but if you have to ask all these questions you probably shouldn't be making the cake.

ddaigle Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:22am
post #8 of

I'm speechless

remnant3333 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:26am
post #9 of

If the reception and wedding is up a hill of bumpy and winding roads I would say to assemble the tiers when you get to the venue. Like someone suggested, you can buy the flowers on line to save you some headache until you get more experience. Also, it would be smart to do a trial run and see how it goes. Make sure you level the cakes evenly so the tiers will not look crooked.  You will definitely have your work cut out for you. Good luck and let us know how your trial run goes.
 

sixinarow Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:30am

I would ask, are you ready to ruin a couples' wedding day if you don't do a good job?

This isn't just about you improving your skill and trying something new. This is someone's wedding day. If you've only piped star tips and drop flowers, then offer those on the wedding cake, otherwise, please let them go to another baker who has actual experience with fondant. There have been Waaaaay too many threads about first time wedding cakes ending in disasters because a novice baker was ill-prepared for the job.

I'm sorry if this seems harsh, but from the questions you are asking, it does not seem that you are ready for a fondant wedding cake. You very well MAY be able to do weddings in the future, but reading books and watching videos do not give you the experience you need to make someone's wedding cake in less than 1 month.

lolarx8 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:34am

Making a wedding cake is so much more complex than even the things you listed. Please research, practice, or even reconsider taking on this project. You don't want to have a huge overwhelming endeavor on your first wedding cake. Start slow and easy, then learn as you go.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:40am

Based solely on what you wrote, I would be worried and concerned.  But who knows.  Maybe you have great talent.

 

Do you have some photos of previous work?

 

Have you ever done a square cake?  They are really very difficult.  If you have no practice with squares, I really encourage you to at least modify the design to a round version.

 

Please do a practice cake.  At least one.  This will give you an idea of any adjustments you may need to make in time or design.

Annabakescakes Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:41am

AIs this a real post, or a troll, trying g to stir up "one of those threads" where it is a poo flinging contest? Home bakers and newbies vs professionals who are just trying to be real.i

just4fun26 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:44am

AI'm a home baker as well. I can make a great cake, but this seems like a very big task to take on. I am not saying you can't do it, please don't think I'm trying to put you down in any way. I just feel like given all the circumstances, I would not do it. If it did not turn out, for any reason, there is no.second chance and no way to fix it if something goes bad that day. This is just my opinion. That being said, if you do go ahead with it, do your homework. Use tutorials online. YouTube has some great ones. Order everything you need within the next day. Good luck.

Smckinney07 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:48am

A

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

Is this a real post, or a troll, trying g to stir up "one of those threads" where it is a poo flinging contest? Home bakers and newbies vs professionals who are just trying to be real.i

Nope lol she posted a whole new thread already. Apparently she didn't like our advise.

Smckinney07 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:50am

ANevermind it was someone else

milkmaid42 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:53am

I think Anna took the words right out of my mouth. I can't believe this is an actual letter, it contains every cliche known. It it's true, I'm speechless. Guess Ddaigle already used that one, too. 

 

If this is genuine, op better really get ready for a reality check. (Trying to say that respectfully. After all there is a first time for everything. But really, a wedding cake?)

 

Jan

just4fun26 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 12:59am

A

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

Is this a real post, or a troll, trying g to stir up "one of those threads" where it is a poo flinging contest? Home bakers and newbies vs professionals who are just trying to be real.i

This comment is rude. Home bakers and newbie s are asking questions so we can learn. Maybe taking on a task like this is too much for the OP right now, but why must you make remarks like this?

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:01am

I'm sorry, but a couple's wedding is not the time to be experimenting. Google 'tire cake eBay' and you will see why.

It is unfair to them, most people practice for years before they attempt a wedding cake, 3 weeks is simply not enough time to learn how to torte, fill, smooth ice, fondant and stack a wedding cake.

I'm assuming by 'home baker', you mean you are not a business, which makes it completely illegal for you to be getting compensated for this cake. The amount of money it will cost you for all the items you listed will be more than hiring an established baker to make the cake. Although with 3 weeks to go, it would be hard to find a baker.

 

I'm really not trying to be a bully here, just realistic.

Smckinney07 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:02am

AI think she just meant a 'troll' like someone who trolls the Internet stirring people up.

Not that the original poster is actuall a Troll or stupid or whatever.

ddaigle Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:06am

AI don't know why y'alll are wasting precious energy on this post

Norasmom Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:08am

Don't use foam core, use cake boards.  They are pre-cut to the size of the layers! 

 

The experienced bakers on this forum have a point, a wedding cake is very ambitious.  If the bride knows that this is your first wedding cake and it might not be perfect and is okay with that, then go for it.  It might come out beyond perfect, as some cake decorators are "naturals."  (I'm not...so I don't do weddings...icon_biggrin.gif)

 

Also, since you don't have a lot of cake tools, this cake is going to cost you a fortune.  Be prepared...

 

As for transport, definitely use an SPS system.  Google SPS for cakes and you will see ordering information.

 

Give yourself a lot of time to make this cake.  It's best to bake the layers ahead of time and freeze them.  

 

Square cakes are very difficult...the corners are not fun!  I think you should make a practice cake to figure it all out.  I sold my square pans on ebay...I hated decorating them big time!

just4fun26 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:10am

AI personally would not do it. I get lots of complements on my cakes but I would not be comfortable making a wedding cake. I am a home baker as well, but comments like that make it difficult for us newbies to ask questions. When I ask a question, I am looking for answers from those who have more experience than me, not remarks like that.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:14am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle View Post

I don't know why y'alll are wasting precious energy on this post

Like moths to a lamp, some of us just can't resist :)

vgcea Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:23am

A

Original message sent by Nickithebaker

I am a home baker, I have decorated a few Wilton shaped cakes for birthday parties.  My family raves about these, so I was asked to do a wedding cake! [B](anyone can decorate a cake with a star tip and drop flowers!![/B])   [B]HELP[/B]!! icon_eek.gif    The wedding is 9/14 

I feel like I can do this, with the right direction.  

The bride wants a square stacked cake covered with white fondant.   She wants roses on the cake as decorations.  Pretty simple I think... 

I have never worked with fondant, so I have been Googleing and watching YouTube videos... but I need some live feedback! 

I am going to purchase a Magic Line square cake pan set.   I think I'm going to do a 12", 10" and 8".  

I know I need a support - should I use cardboard or the foam core?  I am seeing debates going both ways.   I am shopping at [URL=http://www.globalsugarart.com]www.globalsugarart.com[/URL]  and [URL=http://www.sweetwise.com]www.sweetwise.com[/URL]  ... found both of them through YouTube. 

Oh - here is a big factor - The wedding venue is 60 miles up a winding, BUMPY country road.  Do I assemble the cake at home and drive it up there?   I also have the option of making the whole thing at the venue - there will be a full kitchen, [B]but no internet if I need last minute YouTube help.  [/B]

I need to buy almost everything... the only things I have are some Wilton tips and a pastry bag. 

Can anyone recommend tools?

I think I want a cake stand spinner thing,  I need a smoother tool for the fondant, I don't know WHAT I need to make the roses.   I saw a video where a lady had some kind of foam thing that she used to make the petals look real.  Don't know what it's called.  I'm guessing I need a rolling pin, do I need a mat or a board?   What about food coloring for the fondant / gumpaste flowers? Her colors are hot pink and blue.   What about a leveler? I don't trust my self to cut the tops of the cakes level.  Long spatula things?    

How much fondant do I need?  What is a good brand? 

Thank you sooo much!! 

I call bu!! $#!+ All the classics on that post. People really have time for this?

shanter Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 1:45am

We are not being rude. We are being realistic. Someone who has never worked with fondant intends to make a square wedding cake? Oh, please.

just4fun26 Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 2:21am

A

Original message sent by shanter

We are not being rude. We are being realistic. Someone who has never worked with fondant intends to make a square wedding cake? Oh, please.

I agree. I havent even done a square, I'm scared. I'd never do my first square on a wedding cake, but even if I owned a bakery for 20 years, I'd never say, "is this real or a troll."

I think my point is being missed.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 2:28am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle View Post

I'm speechless

lol to this - with all the questions it makes me wonder if this is just a 'I am pulling your leg comment'. If this is a real question my advice is that unless this is a much loved family member you are doing the cake for Down your tools immediately and speak to the bride honestly about what you can and cant do before doing another thing on this cake!

 

 

Edited to include - just read the rest of the comments and as a 'newbie homebaker' must say I was going to tell you also that it sounds like your cake may be the next one to land on EBay if you go ahead with this.

mskerrih Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 3:11am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes View Post

Is this a real post, or a troll, trying g to stir up "one of those threads" where it is a poo flinging contest? Home bakers and newbies vs professionals who are just trying to be real.i

This was my first thought detective.gif   lol

Annabakescakes Posted 23 Aug 2013 , 3:12am

LET THE POO START FLYING!!! 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by just4fun26 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes View Post

Is this a real post, or a troll, trying g to stir up "one of those threads" where it is a poo flinging contest? Home bakers and newbies vs professionals who are just trying to be real.i

This comment is rude. Home bakers and newbie s are asking questions so we can learn. Maybe taking on a task like this is too much for the OP right now, but why must you make remarks like this?

So many things I could say... so little time to translate it to meaningless PC garbage.... Suffice to say, please don't make this about me. And I can say you are rude for saying I am rude, but what difference does it make? And I really couldn't care less.

Quote:
Originally Posted by just4fun26 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by shanter View Post

We are not being rude. We are being realistic. Someone who has never worked with fondant intends to make a square wedding cake? Oh, please.

I agree. I havent even done a square, I'm scared. I'd never do my first square on a wedding cake, but even if I owned a bakery for 20 years, I'd never say, "is this real or a troll."

I think my point is being missed.

Yet you don't have a problem with the bolded part, and the people calling BS, others saying time is wasted on this post? I think I get that the point that this thread is to call me out, since others have harsh words, and I asked a legitimate question. 

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