howsweet Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 7:12pm
post #1 of

Just got an email from a customer wanting to know if her deposit would be returned after she paid the remaining balance of her order. 

26 replies
Annabakescakes Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 7:20pm
post #2 of

Good grief! I always say it applies toward the purchase price, just in case, but I have never had anyone ask.

therealmrsriley Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 7:29pm
post #3 of

That's usually the case if you rent an apartment! LOL!!

Annabakescakes Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 7:52pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by therealmrsriley 

That's usually the case if you rent an apartment! LOL!!

True!!

as you wish Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 8:13pm
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A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3083823/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

shanter Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 9:11pm
post #6 of

The answer is "no." You could ask her why she thinks she would get her deposit back, since it's part of the cost of her cake.........

jason_kraft Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 9:17pm
post #7 of

AThere's nothing wrong with giving her the deposit back, you would just need to adjust the balance due to include the deposit. Just hand her the deposit in cash and she can hand it right back to you along with the rest of the balance. :D

JWinslow Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 12:09am
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by as you wish 


icon_biggrin.gif

remnant3333 Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 12:19am
post #9 of

Now, this takes the cake!!!!! LOL
 

Smckinney07 Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 12:25am

A]

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

Good grief! I always say it applies toward the purchase price, just in case, but I have never had anyone ask.

^^^^Ditto

Or sure if she wants to complicate things give her a deposit back like Jason suggested adjust your cost.

Maybe she's confused, is she trying to rent a cake?!

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 1:20am

hahahaha

Godot Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 6:44pm

AActually - technically a deposit IS something that is returned.

Use the word 'retainer' instead.

scwright Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 7:02pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft View Post

There's nothing wrong with giving her the deposit back, you would just need to adjust the balance due to include the deposit. Just hand her the deposit in cash and she can hand it right back to you along with the rest of the balance.
icon_biggrin.gif

 

LOL priceless!!

jason_kraft Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 7:09pm

A

Original message sent by Godot

Actually - technically a deposit IS something that is returned.

I sure wish the seller thought that when I put down a 3% earnest money deposit on my house. Deposits are only returned if they are indicated as refundable deposits in the contract and the relevant conditions are met.

Kadesan Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 7:31pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smckinney07 

Is she trying to rent a cake?!

 

I actually chuckled out loud icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 12:49am
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


I sure wish the seller thought that when I put down a 3% earnest money deposit on my house. Deposits are only returned if they are indicated as refundable deposits in the contract and the relevant conditions are met.

Godot is right, though, my attorney said that you should use the word "retainer" if you don't intend to give the money back under any circumstances. "Deposit" can be interpreted as something that's put down against the cost of a finished product, and if they cancel and don't get the finished product the customer can argue that they should get the deposit back. If you say "retainer" then it's implied that the fee is to secure your services as well, so it isn't necessarily refundable. But I'm sure that someone with a weasely attorney could argue it either way if they wanted to take it that far.

howsweet Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:02am

My deposits are fully refundable right up until 8 weeks prior to the event. So far I've had one customer confused about it. Correct or not, I'm pretty sure if I started calling it a retainer, I'd start having more confused people.

costumeczar Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:20am
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 

My deposits are fully refundable right up until 8 weeks prior to the event. So far I've had one customer confused about it. Correct or not, I'm pretty sure if I started calling it a retainer, I'd start having more confused people.

Confused people is one thing there will never be a shortage of.

jason_kraft Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:27am

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

Godot is right, though, my attorney said that you should use the word "retainer" if you don't intend to give the money back under any circumstances.

Or "nonrefundable deposit".

Annabakescakes Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 4:31am

K.I.S.S.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:02am

Although technically a deposit is to be given back people put deposits on things all the time with the assumption that the deposit goes towards the total cost of the product or service that you are receiving or using, for example a deposit on a holiday is not given back while you are on holiday or a deposit on a car is not returned when you pick up and pay the balance of money owing for the car.

 

That is very funny (love the face palm analogy). You could tell her that the deposit is refundable but the balance owing on the cake is the same as when you first quoted it so she will still have to give you that money plus any remaining outstanding balance.

 

Honestly I think some people do not connect their brain to their mouth before they speak, this girl sounds like hers might still be parked in neutral. 

 

It may be helpful to explain in your contract that the balance owing is the total cost minus the deposit. 

 

Thanks for the laugh. icon_razz.gif

vgcea Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:27am

A

Original message sent by bubs1stbirthday

Although technically a deposit is to be given back people put deposits on things all the time with the assumption that the deposit goes towards the total cost of the product or service that you are receiving or using, for example a deposit on a holiday is not given back while you are on holiday or a deposit on a car is not returned when you pick up and pay the balance of money owing for the car.

That is very funny (love the face palm analogy). You could tell her that the deposit is refundable but the balance owing on the cake is the same as when you first quoted it so she will still have to give you that money plus any remaining outstanding balance.

Honestly I think some people do not connect their brain to their mouth before they speak,[B] this girl sounds like hers might still be parked in neutral. [/B]

It may be helpful to explain in your contract that the balance owing is the total cost minus the deposit. 

Thanks for the laugh. icon_razz.gif

Bahahahahahaaaaahhhahaha!!!

howsweet Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 6:54am
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

Confused people is one thing there will never be a shortage of.


That's true. No matter what you do there's always the odd exception. Like that person who decided I sold her a dummy cake and didn't think to try cutting into to it just in case she might find that chocolate cake she'd ordered.

daryll Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 7:04am

AQuote: Originally Posted by costumeczar View Post

Confused people is one thing there will never be a shortage of.

That's true. No matter what you do there's always the odd exception. Like that person who decided I sold her a dummy cake and didn't think to try cutting into to it just in case she might find that chocolate cake she'd ordered.

This cracks me up every time I think of it and I was telling someone about it just yesterday!

costumeczar Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 12:45pm

A

Original message sent by howsweet

That's true. No matter what you do there's always the odd exception. Like that person who decided I sold her a dummy cake and didn't think to try cutting into to it just in case she might find that chocolate cake she'd ordered.

I remember that one...I'll add the woman who complained that all I did to decorate a beach cake was to "throw some real shells on it." I told her they were all made out of sugar and hand painted, and she was silent for a minute then said "well, I didn't get to eat any of them."

Edited to add: I should have said "madam, your IQ is not my problem."

cakegrandma Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:03pm

Edited to add: I should have said "madam, your IQ is not my problem."

 

At that pint I think I would have wondered if their IQ was either their shoe size or room temperature.

BatterUpCake Posted 24 Aug 2013 , 1:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by therealmrsriley 

That's usually the case if you rent an apartment! LOL!!

But if you eat your apartment you don't get the deposit back! lol

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