lulubean Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 10:25pm
post #1 of

Hello! I am hoping for some advice on how to accomplish the following: 

 

I am baking a 3 tier wedding cake for a family member in about a month. The cake will be 10, 8, and 6x3 inch rounds. I live in Philadelphia and will be driving to Cape Cod for the wedding. It is about a 6.5 hour drive. We have to be there by Friday, but the wedding isn't until Saturday.  

 

We plan on driving there on Thursday night. I was thinking about baking the cakes Thursday during the day, wrapping them tightly and then traveling with them. Is this too far in advance? Do I have to keep the cakes cold for the drive?  

 

I then thought I could crumb coat and stack them at the venue on Friday morning. I can either do the final decorations Friday afternoon or Saturday morning at the location. They said there is a large fridge that I can store the cake in. I plan to do a crusting butter cream on all 3 tiers. (should it be in the fridge or left out) If it is in the fridge should I get a box for it? 

 

Any advice on when to bake these cakes would be greatly appreciated. This is my first time baking a wedding cake so if you want to throw in any other advice about your favorite crusting frosting, best way to stack, etc. I have been online checking out all the tutorials and have found some great stuff, but I would greatly appreciate help for the bakers on this board. Thanks in advance for your help! 

12 replies
manddi Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 10:45pm
post #2 of

AI'd bake, fill, and decorate them all ahead of time and freeze them (unstacked). Put them in an ice chest (not touching each other[unless you use some dry ice]) for the drive up and stack them there.

Edna De La Cruz has a great crusting bc recipe at designmeacake.com

I promise I'm not trying to discourage you but if you don't know how to stack a cake are you sure you want to practice on someone's wedding cake?

lulubean Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 11:30pm
post #3 of

Thanks for the advice! It's ok, I'm not discouraged! I have stacked cakes before, but I used a pretty simple method with thin plastic dowels and there wasn't any travel involved. Just wondering what products or "tricks" worked best in other peoples experience for the whole wedding cake making process. I plan to make a cake ahead of time to "practice" before the event so hopefully I can work any kinks out then. Thanks again for the advice!! :) 

manddi Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 12:41pm
post #4 of

AOh good! A ton of folks love sps for stacking. I personally haven't tried it yet since wooden dowels are cheap (I've been known to pinch a penny so tight it squashes to the size of a nickel) but I don't think that sps is that expensive (just a bit more so than wooden dowels).

Have you ever frozen a fully decorated cake before? If be happy to give you instructions if you need them.

lulubean Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:58pm
post #5 of

Hello! No, never! I would love to hear your method for freezing an iced cake! I have heard and seen a bunch of different options. Thanks again for all your help! :) 

dukeswalker Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 8:25pm
post #6 of

What is the design of the cake you are planning on making?

lulubean Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 8:57pm
post #7 of

Hello! I planned to do rosettes on the bottom and top tiers and then keep the center smooth and pipe a design similar to her invitation in white butter cream. I plan to do the rosettes and the center tier design at the venue. 

lulubean Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 9:15pm
post #8 of

I should have mention that the venue offered me the use of their kitchen, so I thought it may be easier to do the decorating there vs doing it at the house I am staying at and worrying about driving it with. (thought it isn't really a far drive) :) 

manddi Posted 20 Aug 2013 , 12:49pm
post #9 of

ASounds like a pretty design :) rosettes are relativity easy so you may want to wait and do those there but you can have your cake filled, crumb coated, and ready to go.

Place decorated (or crumb coated) cake in a cardboard box. Wrap box in 3 layers of plastic wrap and one layer of foil and freeze.

A slow defrost is best. Normally I'd say put it in the fridge the night before then place on the counter the next morning. Don't unwrap until it's completely at room temp!

Since you're traveling with it I'd take them straight out of the freezer and put them in an ice chest at the last possible second for the ride. If they're still cool when you get there just put them on a counter until they're completely at room temp and then unwrap, finish decorating if necessary, and stack.

Hope that helps! Good luck!

lulubean Posted 20 Aug 2013 , 1:34pm

Thanks so much!!! I really appreciate it!! 

manddi Posted 20 Aug 2013 , 9:06pm

ANot a problem!

darkchocolate Posted 20 Aug 2013 , 10:14pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by manddi 

Oh good!
A ton of folks love sps for stacking. I personally haven't tried it yet since wooden dowels are cheap (I've been known to pinch a penny so tight it squashes to the size of a nickel) but I don't think that sps is that expensive (just a bit more so than wooden dowels).

Have you ever frozen a fully decorated cake before? If be happy to give you instructions if you need them.

I've reused the SPS system.  I just take the legs off the plate and wash everything real good and let it air dry. If you don't decorate a lot and know you will get the SPS system returned, it isn't so expensive.

lulubean Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 2:23am

I should be able to get the system back since it is for a family member. I will look into it! Thanks for the advice! 

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