soldiernurse Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 12:20pm
post #1 of

A1. Bleached and unbleached all purpose flour? 2. Cake flour? 3. Better than bread Flour?

And when/why do you use each??:shock:

15 replies
Stitches Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 2:02pm
post #2 of

You'd be smart to go to a flour milling company website like http://www.kingarthurflour.com/flours/ for an exact definition of each. I'm too busy this morning to type, sorry. Sometimes, you've got to experiment yourself using the same recipe and changing out the flours in order to really comprehend the differences and make your own opinions about what you like.

soldiernurse Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:25pm
post #3 of

Does anyone else have anything to add?? I'd rather not waste product if I don't have to..

kikiandkyle Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:34pm
post #4 of

Do you have a more specific question than the ones you asked that were answered by Stitches?

 

Bleached flour is best used for cookies, pancakes and pies. Unbleached for everything else. 

 

Cake flour  - for cakes

 

Bread flour - for bread.

 

You can use AP flour in any of these instances, bleached or unbleached per your own preference. I prefer to use unbleached AP for everything. You can use the specific flours for a more refined product, but it's not a necessity.

Stitches Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:39pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by soldiernurse 

 I'd rather not waste product if I don't have to..

Wasting product is called learning how to bake. Do you want to learn how or do you think you can be great with-out bothering to learn the most basic aspects?

scwright Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:58pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by soldiernurse View Post

Does anyone else have anything to add?? I'd rather not waste product if I don't have to..

 

lol then you must not want to learn to bake. Unfortunately wasting product is part of the process of being a baker and developing recipes. If you are worried about wasting product due to funds try using boxed mixes and canned frostings until you can experiment with scratch recipes without stressing yourself out....

sewsugarqueen Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 3:30am
post #7 of

Actually your questions make sense because different types of flour work for different products and it is important to know about that.

Flour types are based on the wheats ( a variety) with different proteins contents...some produce more gluten than others and so your choice for a recipe will be ... do you want more gluten or not.

a) high proteins are  recommended for yeast products like breads, rolls and stuff that needs support. This would be your bread flour.

b|)  L.ower protein flour is good for chemically leavened baked goods ie.  using baking powder or baking soda.

c) cake/pastry flours have  low end of protein.  This gives you delicate fine crumb cakes and light airy biscuits.

 

If a recipe recommends cake/pastry flour you want to use it.  Growing up we only used cake flour for cakes but I sometimes try it now for shortcakes and cookies.  I use to use only all purpose flour for just about everything but now  can get the bread flour and use that for breads and bread machines.

 

What I can remember about bleached vs. unbleached flour has to do with processing the flour.  Bleached is faster but has a different taste ( at least for me... only had unbleached flour in stores in my area.)  I think they use chemicals to treat the bleached flour and it is much faster method of production.  ( That turned me off right there).

I have found in a pinch I use all purpose unbleached flour a lot but when the recipe calls for pastry/cake flour you will get a nicer cake.

  Understand why you don't want to waste product.  I always get upset when a new recipe ends up so so or crummy.  You will need to experiment once in a while but hope this flour info keeps you on budget.

cakefat Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 5:38am
post #8 of

I googled "difference between flours" and it came up with 15,000,000 results. 

 

here's one of those:

 

http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-cake-flou-74565

soldiernurse Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 1:43pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakefat 

I googled "difference between flours" and it came up with 15,000,000 results. 

 

here's one of those:

 

http://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-cake-flou-74565

 

 

ikr...thank you!

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by scwright 

 

lol then you must not want to learn to bake. Unfortunately wasting product is part of the process of being a baker and developing recipes. If you are worried about wasting product due to funds try using boxed mixes and canned frostings until you can experiment with scratch recipes without stressing yourself out....

 

 

good idea..tks

soldiernurse Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 1:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sewsugarqueen 

Actually your questions make sense because different types of flour work for different products and it is important to know about that.

Flour types are based on the wheats ( a variety) with different proteins contents...some produce more gluten than others and so your choice for a recipe will be ... do you want more gluten or not.

a) high proteins are  recommended for yeast products like breads, rolls and stuff that needs support. This would be your bread flour.

b|)  L.ower protein flour is good for chemically leavened baked goods ie.  using baking powder or baking soda.

c) cake/pastry flours have  low end of protein.  This gives you delicate fine crumb cakes and light airy biscuits.

 

If a recipe recommends cake/pastry flour you want to use it.  Growing up we only used cake flour for cakes but I sometimes try it now for shortcakes and cookies.  I use to use only all purpose flour for just about everything but now  can get the bread flour and use that for breads and bread machines.

 

What I can remember about bleached vs. unbleached flour has to do with processing the flour.  Bleached is faster but has a different taste ( at least for me... only had unbleached flour in stores in my area.)  I think they use chemicals to treat the bleached flour and it is much faster method of production.  ( That turned me off right there).

I have found in a pinch I use all purpose unbleached flour a lot but when the recipe calls for pastry/cake flour you will get a nicer cake.

  Understand why you don't want to waste product.  I always get upset when a new recipe ends up so so or crummy.  You will need to experiment once in a while but hope this flour info keeps you on budget.

 

 

very informative..thanks for taking the time..I have a better understanding now!! icon_smile.gif

soldiernurse Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 1:45pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by kikiandkyle 

Do you have a more specific question than the ones you asked that were answered by Stitches?

 

Bleached flour is best used for cookies, pancakes and pies. Unbleached for everything else. 

 

Cake flour  - for cakes

 

Bread flour - for bread.

 

You can use AP flour in any of these instances, bleached or unbleached per your own preference. I prefer to use unbleached AP for everything. You can use the specific flours for a more refined product, but it's not a necessity.

 

got it..tks

kaylawaylalayla Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 1:59pm

AA little tidbit we got from school was that ap flour was created so housewives could have a reasonably soft cake and a reasonably firm bread without breaking the bank buying both flowers. Unfortunately I cant find any info on that on the web so it may just be a charming anecdote

MimiFix Posted 21 Aug 2013 , 6:40pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylawaylalayla 

A little tidbit we got from school was that ap flour was created so housewives could have a reasonably soft cake and a reasonably firm bread without breaking the bank buying both flowers. Unfortunately I cant find any info on that on the web so it may just be a charming anecdote

 

The above explanation is fairly accurate (except for the "housewife" word). At my bakery, I used several kinds of white flours: hi-gluten, cake, and pastry. For whole wheat flours: stone ground, ww pastry, and white wheat. We made our own oat flour. 

 

For most home bakers, buying one kind of flour is simpler than keeping several bags in your pantry.

MKC Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 4:18am

AThis article on flour is very interesting: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/baking_science/

soldiernurse Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 7:02pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MKC 

This article on flour is very interesting: http://www.realbakingwithrose.com/baking_science/

 

 

..very interesting..that took quite a bit of work..

soldiernurse Posted 22 Aug 2013 , 7:06pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by MimiFix 

 

The above explanation is fairly accurate (except for the "housewife" word). At my bakery, I used several kinds of white flours: hi-gluten, cake, and pastry. For whole wheat flours: stone ground, ww pastry, and white wheat. We made our own oat flour. 

 

For most home bakers, buying one kind of flour is simpler than keeping several bags in your pantry.

 

 

yes, it is!!

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