dukeswalker Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:08am
post #1 of

Ugh!  This is my 1st 4 tier, square cake.

 

This sucker is HEAVY.  It is a 6/8/10/12 square, filled, fondant cover beast.

 

I am using SPS for supports but I just about ruined the whole stacked cake trying to get my hands under the bottom tier to move it to the fridge.  The cardboard just wanted to mush-i-fy and buckle.  I have it sitting on a sturdy cutting board right now but I am SWEATING because I'm going to have to get this hefty sucker off the cutting board onto the bride's plateau tomorrow.  Help!!  Should I run up to Home Depot and get some plywood?  I do have a sturdy, foam core cake board that I had planned on using but had to ditch it when the bride let me know that it was too wide (so I could cut that down to size if that would indeed work).

 

Even if I get some plywood - how am I supposed to move it from my cutting board to the plywood?

Thanks a ton CCers!!

17 replies
h4xnoodle Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:15am
post #2 of

Get a friend to help you! At least one other person who you can trust to be balanced and careful.

 

Generally I would assemble the top half after it's on the table as then you're dealing with ~1/2 the weight at once. Though it is probably too late to take off a tier.

pastrygirls Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:17am
post #3 of

is it possible to take a couple of the top tiers off to make it lighter and easier to move??  i know it's probably decorated, but might be worth the fixing to lighten the load.  if you're worried about moving it around then i'd head to home depot and pick up some plywood.  better safe than sorry.  as for moving it from the cutting board...try sliding the foam core under the cardobard thats flimsy and use the foam core to transfer it to the plywood.  best of luck

pastrygirls Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:17am
post #4 of

is it possible to take a couple of the top tiers off to make it lighter and easier to move??  i know it's probably decorated, but might be worth the fixing to lighten the load.  if you're worried about moving it around then i'd head to home depot and pick up some plywood.  better safe than sorry.  as for moving it from the cutting board...try sliding the foam core under the cardobard thats flimsy and use the foam core to transfer it to the plywood.  best of luck

dukeswalker Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:19am
post #5 of

Actually - I just pulled off the top two tiers.  Phew....That gives me a little less weight to work with.  (lol...my eye is actually twitching from stressing out! lol!)

loml001 Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:23am
post #6 of

ADo you have a flat edge cookie sheet? If so you could possibly "slide" the cake onto it - it should provide the support you need. Then when ready slide the finished cake onto the plateau. Cardboard just isn't solid enough for that size/weight. But for future cakes, especially of that size, I would suggest that you use a 1/4 inch thick foil covered piece of Masonite board as the base (cut it yourself or you can usually buy them at your cake supply store). If you put the fondant on the bottom layer(already on the board) you should never even see the bottom board and the "mushing" problem will be a thing of the past.

h4xnoodle Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:31am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by dukeswalker 

Actually - I just pulled off the top two tiers.  Phew....That gives me a little less weight to work with.  (lol...my eye is actually twitching from stressing out! lol!)

Glad that worked out!

dukeswalker Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:38am
post #8 of

What is masonite? 

infinitysweets Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 7:12am
post #9 of

A

Original message sent by dukeswalker

Ugh!  This is my 1st 4 tier, square cake.

This sucker is HEAVY.  It is a 6/8/10/12 square, filled, fondant cover beast.

I am using SPS for supports but I just about ruined the whole stacked cake trying to get my hands under the bottom tier to move it to the fridge.  The cardboard just wanted to mush-i-fy and buckle.  I have it sitting on a sturdy cutting board right now but I am SWEATING because I'm going to have to get this hefty sucker off the cutting board onto the bride's plateau tomorrow.  Help!!  Should I run up to Home Depot and get some plywood?  I do have a sturdy, foam core cake board that I had planned on using but had to ditch it when the bride let me know that it was too wide (so I could cut that down to size if that would indeed work).

Even if I get some plywood - how am I supposed to move it from my cutting board to the plywood? Thanks a ton CCers!!

Just curious how many pounds would you say your cake weighed total and how many did it feed? :)

dukeswalker Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 12:50pm

AHmmmm. Pounds? This is a total guesstimate - but maybe 40ish? And it served 130.

leah_s Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 1:02pm

Waitaminit.  You built the cake and the bottom board is just a cardboard round?  nononono.  Yu need MDF/Masonite or a cake drum.

kkmcmahan Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 1:05pm

I picked up a round circular cut piece of wood from the hardware store that I use to move tiered cakes.  It comes in different sized, looks like a cutting board, about an inch thick with a beveled edge and is ready to go (in the lumber section).  I love it, no longer worry about moving a heavy cake.

dukeswalker Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 1:23pm

Actually, I built the cake and the bottom was 3 cake rounds, criss-crossed/taped together and covered in fondant.  For some reason my cake supply store does not carry masonite and the cake drums don't seem to be anything more than thick cardboard. But the cake was obviously going to win in the cardboard vs cake battle.  After stacking it is was just toooo heavy. 

leah_s Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 2:53pm

The cake drums may not seem to be any more than thick cardboard, but I assure you they are very sturdy.  I've made close to 1,000 wedding cakes and always used a drum, if I wasn't using masonite.  You buy masonite at a hardware store.  Your cardboard circles criss crossed and taped together are not intended to provide the type of support your cake needs.

ellavanilla Posted 6 Sep 2013 , 5:11pm

Quote:

Originally Posted by kkmcmahan 
 

I picked up a round circular cut piece of wood from the hardware store that I use to move tiered cakes.  It comes in different sized, looks like a cutting board, about an inch thick with a beveled edge and is ready to go (in the lumber section).  I love it, no longer worry about moving a heavy cake.

 

 

i have one of these too. I've painted it white and have even used it as my cake drum for tiered cheesecakes, which are oh-so heavy.

 

But Leah is correct, a cake drum is made for carrying heavy cakes. 

shanter Posted 7 Sep 2013 , 12:34am

Quote:

Originally Posted by dukeswalker 
 

What is masonite? 

 

Explanation of masonite:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Masonite

dukeswalker Posted 7 Sep 2013 , 1:09am

Quote:

Originally Posted by kkmcmahan 
 

I picked up a round circular cut piece of wood from the hardware store that I use to move tiered cakes.  It comes in different sized, looks like a cutting board, about an inch thick with a beveled edge and is ready to go (in the lumber section).  I love it, no longer worry about moving a heavy cake.

 Are you talking about one of those unfinished, small table tops that they sell at home depot?  I like the idea of it having a beveled edge!

Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s 
 

The cake drums may not seem to be any more than thick cardboard, but I assure you they are very sturdy.  I've made close to 1,000 wedding cakes and always used a drum, if I wasn't using masonite.  You buy masonite at a hardware store.  Your cardboard circles criss crossed and taped together are not intended to provide the type of support your cake needs.

 

Once again, Home Depot to the rescue! lol!  I always assumed masonite was some caking thing....doh!  

mcaulir Posted 7 Sep 2013 , 4:35am

You use some kind of very sturdy base and then attach something to the underside so you can get your fingers under it. I use self-adhesive rubber furniture bumper things, but you can glue little wooden feet, or strips of square dowel under your board as well.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%