ellavanilla Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 5:46pm
post #1 of

I tried the higher ratio ganache today, because I'm also going to try fondant for the first time. 

I cannot believe how hard it is.  What happens as it comes back to room temp? Does it ever soften a little?

 

I'm not sure I like the idea of a solid coating around my cake, although it will probably never go stale! :

icon_wink.gif

 

a second question: I put it on a cold cake, and it was hard before I really got the finish smooth. should I go back and carve it, or leave it with small imperfections? Should I have put it on a room temp cake?

 

jen

34 replies
SugaredSaffron Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 6:18pm
post #2 of

Did you put it in the fridge, freezer? It only gets really hard for me if I put it in there, leave it at room temperature for a few hours and it should be spreadable like peanut butter.
 

ellavanilla Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 9:04pm
post #3 of

I did leave it at room temp until I covered the cake with it. Now it's on my cake and became hard, almost immediately. 

LisaPeps Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 9:58pm
post #4 of

Just use a metal bench scraper or spatula and hold it in boiling water, once it's hot enough it should melt away any imperfections. 

lisaelanna Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 12:37am
post #5 of

I had that problem the last time I made ganache - rock hard ganache :(  I don't know that this is the correct way to do things, but I ended up microwaving it for about 30 seconds and mixing it until everything was melted together.  Then I put it in the fridge for about 15 minutes until it was about the consistency of buttercream.  That gave the cake enough time to warm up a little, too...  Once it was on the cake it did harden up quite a bit but I didn't have any problems with cracking and it was easy to cut and serve the next day.

mcaulir Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 3:33am
post #6 of

It's not rock hard in your mouth though. It's easy to cut and it melts in your mouth. Don't worry!

ellavanilla Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 4:49am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir 

It's not rock hard in your mouth though. It's easy to cut and it melts in your mouth. Don't worry!

this is what i wanted to know, as well. thanks eveyrone

mcaulir Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 7:08am
post #8 of

Oh and yes, you should put it on a room temp cake in future.

Kadesan Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 8:55am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by SugaredSaffron 

Did you put it in the fridge, freezer? It only gets really hard for me if I put it in there, leave it at room temperature for a few hours and it should be spreadable like peanut butter.
 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 

Just use a metal bench scraper or spatula and hold it in boiling water, once it's hot enough it should melt away any imperfections. 

 


N.B: Sorry to hijack your post ellavanilla but its also a ganache question (in the UK).

 

Hi LisaPeps and Sugared Saffron; I notice you are both from the UK too so please may I ask you a question? I actually posted this on another thread but have only had one reply. Can you both please tell me what is the name of the best chocolate here in the UK you use for making your milk, dark and especially your white ganache please? Thanks ladies.

 

Here's what I posted on my previous thread;

 

"Hello fellow UK bakers. I have always used buttercream under all my fondant covered cakes for years. However; I really would love to give ganache a try and possibly convert to it if successful in making a good ganache. I have read horror stories where the ganache didn't set up hard under the cake and was 'squidgy' and melted under the fondant. This has therefore been the only reason I've been reluctant to ever attempt making ganache. I have thoroughly read up on ganache and the appropriate cream (Whipping Cream with 35% fat content if I'm right) to chocolate ratio and now feel more ready to 'take the bull by the horns' and actually make ganache for a cake trial.

 

Please can anyone kindly tell me from their experiences; what is the best brand or the name of the; Dark, Milk, and especially WHITE chocolate they use to make their ganache; regardless of price. What supermarkets, websites or shops sell them please. Any advice will be immensely appreciated. Thanks in advance! icon_smile.gif"

LisaPeps Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 9:36am

AI always ganache my cakes cold and haven't had an issue.

I know that Torta Couture cakes uses belcolade white chocolate for her white ganache. Her cakes are perfection.

I use Sainsburys basic white and dark. Their chocolate is surprisingly good quality considering the price. I don't make milk chocolate ganache but I wouldn't use cadburys or galaxy, you'd need to use a good quality chocolate for that. You need to make sure you use the green whipping cream to make it.

Kadesan Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 9:58am
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 

I always ganache my cakes cold and haven't had an issue.

I know that Torta Couture cakes uses belcolade white chocolate for her white ganache. Her cakes are perfection.

I use Sainsburys basic white and dark. Their chocolate is surprisingly good quality considering the price. I don't make milk chocolate ganache but I wouldn't use cadburys or galaxy, you'd need to use a good quality chocolate for that. You need to make sure you use the green whipping cream to make it.

 



Thanks ever so much Lisa. And good to know its affordable too icon_smile.gif

JSKConfections Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 10:50am

It's probably because you used a 2 to 1 ratio too...usually chocolate I use is 3 to 1 and white chocolate 4 to 1.  I can't imagine a 2 to 1.  The 3 to 1 gets pretty firm as it is.  I have heated a few TBL of cream and added to already made ganache to loosen it a bit, it still dries nice and use the hot knife to smooth it out.  It does seal the cake really good!! lol...

owatto Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 11:05am

I do 2:1 for dark chocolate and it works fine... the rock hardness is what I normally get but I find that as long as once it is covered in fondant, and it sits in the kitchen while I work out the decorations, then it goes to the customers venue/house, then gets served and cut, it is no longer rock hard!
As for white chocolate I always find that when I do 3:1 I get big lumps of white chocolate that hasn't melted, so I use less.. I measure out 3:1 then take out a few handfulls and it's about right.

lorillc Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 11:27am

I hope this isn't a stupid question.

I see  many people using ganache and I have been trying to understand it the last few weeks, so my question is...  Is this always done in  3 steps- buttercream, ganache and then fondant?  Although the cake are beautiful this seems like it would be a  very expensive way to frost a cake. 

owatto Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 11:41am
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorillc 

I hope this isn't a stupid question.

I see  many people using ganache and I have been trying to understand it the last few weeks, so my question is...  Is this always done in  3 steps- buttercream, ganache and then fondant?  Although the cake are beautiful this seems like it would be a  very expensive way to frost a cake. 

I only ganache, then fondant... I have never bothered with buttercream, it doesn't seem to be a step that I need to worry about and have never been asked to do it by a customer.

lorillc Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 12:58pm

Thank-you, I going to try ganache soon!

luckylibra Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 3:16pm

I have never used ganache, always buttercream and I rarely completely cover a cake in fondant anyway as most people don't care for the taste (I make my own and they like the small bits, but a full cake is too sweet). Anyway, my question is what do you do if you typically use ganache and the customer doesn't like chocolate? I believe I understand the purpose of the ganache to be to provide the smooth crisp edges for the fondant to go over but I don't care for chocolate and would think there are others out there who don't care for it either. Didn't mean to hijack the thread but figured with all these ganache experts, now would be the time to ask. :)

mcaulir Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 10:42am
Quote:
Originally Posted by luckylibra 

I have never used ganache, always buttercream and I rarely completely cover a cake in fondant anyway as most people don't care for the taste (I make my own and they like the small bits, but a full cake is too sweet). Anyway, my question is what do you do if you typically use ganache and the customer doesn't like chocolate? I believe I understand the purpose of the ganache to be to provide the smooth crisp edges for the fondant to go over but I don't care for chocolate and would think there are others out there who don't care for it either. Didn't mean to hijack the thread but figured with all these ganache experts, now would be the time to ask. :)

You can use white chocolate, which can be flavoured with extracts, liqueurs etc.

niniel1 Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 4:39pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kadesan 

 

 

 


N.B: Sorry to hijack your post ellavanilla but its also a ganache question (in the UK).

 

Hi LisaPeps and Sugared Saffron; I notice you are both from the UK too so please may I ask you a question? I actually posted this on another thread but have only had one reply. Can you both please tell me what is the name of the best chocolate here in the UK you use for making your milk, dark and especially your white ganache please? Thanks ladies.

 

Here's what I posted on my previous thread;

 

"Hello fellow UK bakers. I have always used buttercream under all my fondant covered cakes for years. However; I really would love to give ganache a try and possibly convert to it if successful in making a good ganache. I have read horror stories where the ganache didn't set up hard under the cake and was 'squidgy' and melted under the fondant. This has therefore been the only reason I've been reluctant to ever attempt making ganache. I have thoroughly read up on ganache and the appropriate cream (Whipping Cream with 35% fat content if I'm right) to chocolate ratio and now feel more ready to 'take the bull by the horns' and actually make ganache for a cake trial.

 

Please can anyone kindly tell me from their experiences; what is the best brand or the name of the; Dark, Milk, and especially WHITE chocolate they use to make their ganache; regardless of price. What supermarkets, websites or shops sell them please. Any advice will be immensely appreciated. Thanks in advance! icon_smile.gif"

I use lindt white chocolate. I have used the tesco basic white chocolate and it has worked pretty well too, but I do think the lindt is a bit nicer.

Kadesan Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 6:33pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by niniel1 

I use lindt white chocolate. I have used the tesco basic white chocolate and it has worked pretty well too, but I do think the lindt is a bit nicer.

Oh wow; thanks for your reply niniel1. What shop or supermarket do you buy it from please. And could you post a picture of what the packet looks like please so I know to buy the right one. Thanks a lot icon_smile.gif

Smckinney07 Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 8:19pm

Ahttp://www.artandappetite.com/2009/11/ganache-instead-of-buttercream/

This has some great videos about making ganache and using it to cover a cake. If my ganache hardens up while I'm working on a cake I'll stick it in the microwave for 30seconds to soften it back up.

dawnybird Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 8:42pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir 

You can use white chocolate, which can be flavoured with extracts, liqueurs etc.


This has been my question about ganache, too. If you make, for example, a lemon cake, you sure don't want chocolate ganache on it. I knew you could use white chocolate but didn't realize you could add extracts and such. Will it not make the chocolate seize?

One more question: when you talk about ratios, as in 2:1 or 3:2, which is first, chocolate or cream?

Thank you!

Smckinney07 Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 8:57pm

AYou can cook the cream over the stove (don't let it boil) and infuse flavors there, zest or chi. If you add flavorings or liquors you want to add them after you put the cream in the chocolate before you mix it. Temperate is what you need to be aware of. I will add an article. Chocolate comes first.

Smckinney07 Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 9:03pm

Ahttp://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/10838/how-do-i-infuse-fruit-flavor-in-ganache

Dark Chocolate 2:1 ratio, two pounds of chocolate use one pound of cream White or Milk Chocolate 3:1 milk and white are usually softer

This is just how I do it. I've heard other people using 2:1 for all types of chocolate.

niniel1 Posted 18 Aug 2013 , 10:56pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kadesan 

Oh wow; thanks for your reply niniel1. What shop or supermarket do you buy it from please. And could you post a picture of what the packet looks like please so I know to buy the right one. Thanks a lot icon_smile.gif

 

I buy it in tesco. I think it's around £1.80 for 100g. Here's a link to what it looks like http://www.friarsofkeswick.co.uk/chocolate-c1/chocolate-bars-c5/lindt-chocolate-bars-c28/lindt-excellence-white-with-a-touch-of-vanilla-p494

mcaulir Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 1:30am

I've just added extracts and liqueurs after everything is mixed together.

Kadesan Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 9:51am
Quote:
Originally Posted by niniel1 

 

I buy it in tesco. I think it's around £1.80 for 100g. Here's a link to what it looks like http://www.friarsofkeswick.co.uk/chocolate-c1/chocolate-bars-c5/lindt-chocolate-bars-c28/lindt-excellence-white-with-a-touch-of-vanilla-p494

Thanks again. So it definitely has to be the Lindt white chocolate with A TOUCH OF VANILLA?

dawnybird Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:56pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smckinney07 

http://cooking.stackexchange.com/questions/10838/how-do-i-infuse-fruit-flavor-in-ganache

Dark Chocolate 2:1 ratio, two pounds of chocolate use one pound of cream
White or Milk Chocolate 3:1 milk and white are usually softer

This is just how I do it. I've heard other people using 2:1 for all types of chocolate.


Thanks so much for your help!

dawnybird Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 2:59pm

Now, for one last question: For those of you who cover your cakes with ganache, then fondant, do you also fill with ganache or do you use buttercream or some other filling?

Thanks for your patience with my rookie questions!

Smckinney07 Posted 19 Aug 2013 , 3:21pm

AI use one or the other. If the customer wants ganache I fill with ganache too, if the want BC I fill and cover with BC. Unless they ask for something different.

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