howsweet Posted 11 Aug 2013 , 6:04pm
post #1 of

I had isomalt crystals that I'd bought a few years ago, otherwise, I'd have bought the nibs. But it wasn't hard at all and I kind of like the idea of trying sugar and corn syrup even. However, my "ice cubes" came out just slightly yellow.

 

I used a cooling bath and cooked to the exact temp.   I'm thinking my thermometer may be a bit off? I didn't calibrate my thermometer.

 

Could the age of the crystals have been a factor?

28 replies
costumeczar Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 12:05am
post #2 of

No, it was probably tap water. Did you use that, or distilled water? Tap water has impuritites in it that can make the cooked isomalt turn yellow. It can also do that if you get it too hot when you're cooking it, but even if you keep it at the the-right temp it can be yellowish if you use water from the tap.

sewsugarqueen Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 2:19pm
post #3 of

Isomalt sugar doesn't turn out as clear as using regular sugar when doing that work but it is suppose to be stronger and easier to work with.  Turning yellow I would agree with the other poster.... what's in the water will affect clear sugarwork.  Ewald Notter has a book out on working with sugar and isomalt.  Yes it is expensive but if you really want to work with the stuff it is a great book.  The guy is a real genius with sugarwork.  Taking a class from him is on my " if I win the lotto wish list". 

 

Did you use straight isomalt ( looks sort of like white sugar) or did you use those sticks that look like a candy stick?  I'm not thrilled with the coloured candy stick isomalt but maybe I havn't worked with them enough. 

smittyditty Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 4:19pm
post #4 of

The crystals are clear and the only reason they wouldn't be is what costumeczar said. I use both nibs and crystals.

1. No tap water the minerals make it change yellow

2. Too hot burns the sugar making it yellow
 

howsweet Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 4:59pm
post #5 of

Thanks, y'all. I did use distilled water, so it must have gotten too hot, right?  I found this link for calibrating your thermometer if any one is interested.

I'll do that before trying this again.

 

Sugar Queen, I used  bag of the stuff that looks like granulated white sugar. I figured the nibs would be easiest, don't you just melt them? It would have been ok if they weren't so clear, but I was sad about the yellowness.

 

How long do you leave it in the water bath? Maybe that was where I went wrong. I sat it in the water for maybe 20 seconds, if that.

costumeczar Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 9:39pm
post #6 of

That should have been okay for the time in the water. It probably just did get too hot, so try it again when you recalibrate the thermometer.

 

I haven't used the cake play colroed sticks, but I cook isomalt from the powdery form too, and it behaves a little differently when it's cooked the first time and when it's been sitting and remelted. Maybe the sticks just aren't going to act exactly the same as "fresh"  because of that.

maybenot Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 10:13pm
post #7 of

Another possible contaminant would be some sort of residue in the pot or on the thermometer [or any other utensil inserted into the hot isomalt.

costumeczar Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 2:16am
post #8 of

good point, it could be from a wooden spoon or something like that too.

Annabakescakes Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 6:14pm
post #9 of

What is the water used for? I am going to try isomalt soon....

costumeczar Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 7:58pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

What is the water used for? I am going to try isomalt soon....

You dissolve the isomalt int he water before heating it, It's just a way to slow it down some so that you don't burn it right away. You could theoretically do it without water but only if you were super experienced in heating sugar without it, and I wouldn't try.

sewsugarqueen Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 8:22pm

I've only cooked sugar or used the isomalt sticks.  Didn't want to use isomalt cause I was told by professionals the burns from it are even worse than sugar.  Will have to read up on the isomalt and water bath info...learned something new.  Are you shaping or forming your product or pouring molds?

Annabakescakes Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 10:21pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

What is the water used for? I am going to try isomalt soon....

You dissolve the isomalt int he water before heating it, It's just a way to slow it down some so that you don't burn it right away. You could theoretically do it without water but only if you were super experienced in heating sugar without it, and I wouldn't try.

Ah...I thought it was just heated as is! Shows what I know! I did buy some silicone cupcake liners to melt it in, (they were on sale!) But I haven't even bought the nibs yet. 

howsweet Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 11:53pm

That what I thought for the nibs, that you just crumble them and put them in the molds in the oven for a few min, but i haven't tried that yet. I've done that many times with hard candy like butterscotch for things like making windows. Or the stained glass effect for cookies. But I didn't have the nibs, I had those white granulated crystals.

I bought some rock candy today, going to see how that melts.
 

sixinarow Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 12:01am

I'm stalking your thread for future reference. icon_biggrin.gif

costumeczar Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 3:01am

The nibs and sticks are pre-cooked, so you do just reheat those in the microwave, no water involved. The isomalt powder itself is mixed with water then cooked to 350, so don't mix the pre-cooked stuff with water!

 

The benefit of using isomalt is its ease of use compared with regular sugar. It doesn't crystallize as easily, it can be cooked then cooled then reheated, and it's less temperamental than regular sugar, which needs to be handled carefully so that it doesn't crystallise.

 

The downside is that isomalt is made from beet sugar, which can result in "intestinal distress" if you eat too much of it. So if you make hard candy out of isomalt, only give it to your enemies. Do not eat an isomalt lollipop unless you're a serious masochist.

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 3:11am

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

The nibs and sticks are pre-cooked, so you do just reheat those in the microwave, no water involved. The isomalt powder itself is mixed with water then cooked to 350, so don't mix the pre-cooked stuff with water!

The benefit of using isomalt is its ease of use compared with regular sugar. It doesn't crystallize as easily, it can be cooked then cooled then reheated, and it's less temperamental than regular sugar, which needs to be handled carefully so that it doesn't crystallise.

The downside is that isomalt is made from beet sugar, which can result in "intestinal distress" if you eat too much of it. So if you make hard candy out of isomalt, only give it to your enemies. Do not eat an isomalt lollipop unless you're a serious masochist.

Hmmm, isomalt lollipops marketed to brides who are having trouble fitting into their wedding dress... I like it! Lol, JK!

AZCouture Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 3:49am

Ahttp://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000EVQWKC. Read the reviews. Not isomalt, but related. Make sure.you're not drinking at the time you start to read.

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 5:03am

A

Original message sent by AZCouture

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000EVQWKC. Read the reviews. Not isomalt, but related. Make sure.you're not drinking at the time you start to read.

I just laughed my butt off! Not really, but i think i know a good way to lose some weight...

My tummy hurts from laughing!

costumeczar Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 11:24am

I was going to post the same link, hahaha! Some of those reviews should win creative writing awards.

Annabakescakes Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 12:46pm

AI have read reviews for a skinned gutted rabbit that are similar, (fake and creative) and for a Bic pen for her, that are hysterical! Tears!

Angrycakeeater Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 1:01pm

One tip is to never eat cake made by Mrs. Goodger.

 

I ate one once. It was a ****ing disgrace.

sixinarow Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 1:36pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


Hmmm, isomalt lollipops marketed to brides who are having trouble fitting into their wedding dress... I like it! Lol, JK!

Isomalt lollipops for PITA people in life......would you like a "special" lollipop?? icon_twisted.gif

smittyditty Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 12:05am

Well ya learn something new everyday.

I use the Nibs and I add water. I just check it with my electronic candy thermometer and once its reached 325degrees I use it. No problems
 

maybenot Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 12:13am

The beauty of the pre-cooked nibs, pearls, and sticks is that they don't need to be cooked [with water].  They've already been "cooked" and are designed to maintain the proper amount of moisture in that state.  They just need to be melted under a heat lamp, in the oven, in the microwave, or on the stove.  As soon as they're completely liquid, they're basically ready for use.

smittyditty Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 12:45am

Good to know I'll start saving my water..lol
 

bubs1stbirthday Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 7:25am
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000EVQWKC. Read the reviews. Not isomalt, but related. Make sure.you're not drinking at the time you start to read.

Hahahaha how funny - 'perfect lolly for greedy co-workers'  so funny, some fun to be had with those.

kaylawaylalayla Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 2:19pm

A

Original message sent by sewsugarqueen

Isomalt sugar doesn't turn out as clear as using regular sugar when doing that work...[B]i thought that iy was the opposite? And that isomalt carmelized at much higher temperatures? I guess i dont know though[/B] Ewald Notter has a book out on working with sugar and isomalt.  Taking a class from him is on my " if I win the lotto wish list". 

[B]His school is now empty, I heard he up and left and the place looks abandoned. At least last time we drove by.

[/B]

costumeczar Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 4:31pm
maybenot Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 5:51am

It is the opposite--cooked isomalt is clearer than cooked sugar.  Although isomalt will burn/scorch, yes, it is at much higher temps than sugar.

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