Help!!corrugated Cake Circles Are Ruining My Life!!

Decorating By Stephanie3 Updated 9 Aug 2013 , 1:46pm by AZCouture

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 4:33pm
post #1 of 32

So, I have been using corrugated cake circles for stacking purposes and they have been a nightmare for me. Everytime I use them:

 

1. they  are always bigger than my cakes

2.  my fondant covering looks HORRIBLE

3. whenever I pick up the cakes I hold the bottom of course but then my fondant starts to mess up like the board is pushing into my cake. Then my fondant gets all wrinkly and my cakes then separate from the board.

 

i just dont know what to do...PLEASE HELP :(

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31 replies
Norasmom Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 5:25pm
post #2 of 32

I would suggest covering the boards themselves with fondant, and making sure they are slightly smaller than the cakes.

Rachelsweets Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 5:31pm
post #3 of 32

AYour rounds are slightly to big. They need to be a touch smaller than the cake. After I place the cake on the round, I take a pair of scissors and trim away the extra cardboard

sabre Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 5:49pm
post #4 of 32

Many decorators use foam core instead of cake boards to support their cakes.  Foam core can be found at Michaels and other craft stores.
 

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 5:59pm
post #5 of 32

Thanks for the advice! could they also be too thin? has anyone else experienced anything like this? Or am I the only one?

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:01pm
post #6 of 32

these can be used for stacking too?

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:02pm
post #7 of 32

can dowels go through those (foam cores) without traces of it being left on or throughout the cake?

AZCouture Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:05pm
post #8 of 32

Ok wait wait wait. Whatever you're doing, it's wrong. Have you watched videos on how to ice cakes? You ice to the shape of the board. Cardboard, foam, whatever. Get the icing on there, and MORE than you need, so that it's sticking out beyond the edge of the board/foam core. You then spin it round on your turntable, with a bench scraper that is rested firmly up against that board/foam core. I hate trying to explain this, but go watch some videos and maybe it will click.

 

And you want the cardboard/foam bigger than your cake, so you can get a nice healthy layer of bc on there.

AZCouture Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:09pm
post #9 of 32

Here, I googled one for you. Might be different slightly for each person, but here's the basics.

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:11pm
post #10 of 32

I have watched the videos, but I sure will watch again. Thanks!

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:15pm
post #11 of 32

Sorry I do not see a video.

AZCouture Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:26pm
post #12 of 32

ASorry I thought I pasted it. I'm on my phone now and can't grab a link. I just googled how to ice a cake, and Edna De La Cruz' YouTube video popped up.

AZCouture Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 6:28pm
post #13 of 32

Aanyways, to make a long story short, your icing should be completely straight up and down and completely filled in to the edge of your board, so when your fondant goes on, now everything is completely covered. no gaps and you shouldn't see the board at all.

Stephanie3 Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 7:01pm
post #14 of 32

Thanks so much for the helpful tips.s!  I thought I only had to do crumb coats before applying the fondant.

AZCouture Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 9:11pm
post #15 of 32

AI don't crumb coat, it's not necessary if you're careful, but I don't work with American BC so maybe it is, but either way, the result is the same, nice straight up and down icing.

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 9:19pm
post #16 of 32

I don't find it necessary to crumbcoat with the meringue icings. The ABC tear my cake up. Haven't  got that down...probably never will because I hate it. Hate the taste, the texture, pretty much everything

AZCouture Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 9:22pm
post #17 of 32

A

Original message sent by BatterUpCake

I don't find it necessary to crumbcoat with the meringue icings. The ABC tear my cake up. Haven't  got that down...probably never will because I hate it. Hate the taste, the texture, pretty much everything

Exactly. Meringues go on soft and don't pull the crumbs up. Fill, ice, chill, hot knife to a glassy smooth finish. And no bulging, no bubbles under fondant, sharp edges....sorry, got carried away a bit, just love my meringues!

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 9:51pm
post #18 of 32

I've never done the hot knife...too many people say the butter will streak. Not true?

lorieleann Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 2:49am
post #19 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 

I've never done the hot knife...too many people say the butter will streak. Not true?

 

if you are covering with fondant, then the streaky butter isn't an issue.  

 

 

I fully agree with AZCouture on the buttercream process:  you use the buttercream to build the cake out to the board, and keep it cold to help hold the shape while applying fondant.  I prefer to use a SMBC under fondant because it is just so easy to get nice crisp edges, but you can also get a nice, hard finish in the fridge with a 2/3 butter & 1/3 shortening blend in your American Buttercream.  

leah_s Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 3:09am
post #20 of 32

1.  The cardboard is supposed to be slightly bigger than the cake.  That's where the icing/ganache goes.

2.  Build up the icing/ganache to the edge, use a hot knife or bench scraper - held along the edge of the cardboard - and while spinning the turntable, smooth the icing/ganache while taking away any excess.  When you're finished with this process the icing/ganache should be even with the edge of the cardboard.

3.  After chilling, apply fondant.  Make sure the fondant covers the bottom edge.

 

The cakes in your pictures didn't look like anything to do with your boards.

In the first pic, the bottom tier hadn't settled.  The second tier looks like the supports are too tall, causing a gap between the top and middle tiers.  

 

In the second picture, you probably should have used foamcore.  Having the corners overhang into unsupported space like that it a little tougher style to pull off.  It absolutely needs the extra support of foamcore.  (If you want to set squares at angles but keep the corners on the cake below, then figure the diagonal of the square is equal to about 1 + 1/3 of a side dimension.  Therefore a 6" square will just barely fit on an 8" square, which will need an 11" square below it.)

Stitches Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 3:30am
post #21 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Ok wait wait wait. Whatever you're doing, it's wrong. Have you watched videos on how to ice cakes? You ice to the shape of the board. Cardboard, foam, whatever. Get the icing on there, and MORE than you need, so that it's sticking out beyond the edge of the board/foam core. You then spin it round on your turntable, with a bench scraper that is rested firmly up against that board/foam core. I hate trying to explain this, but go watch some videos and maybe it will click.

 

And you want the cardboard/foam bigger than your cake, so you can get a nice healthy layer of bc on there.

Ditto!! That's the issue, don't look any further or accept any more responses/reasons why. That's it totally! Learn that, and your border around your base will be perfect every time whether you use fondant or just butter cream.

BatterUpCake Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 11:52am
post #22 of 32

AG

Original message sent by lorieleann

if you are covering with fondant, then the streaky butter isn't an issue.

Good point 

I fully agree with AZCouture on the buttercream process:  you use the buttercream to build the cake out to the board, and keep it cold to help hold the shape while applying fondant.  I prefer to use a SMBC under fondant because it is just so easy to get nice crisp edges, but you can also get a nice, hard finish in the fridge with a 2/3 butter & 1/3 shortening blend in your American Buttercream.  

yortma Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 1:10pm
post #23 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

I don't crumb coat, it's not necessary if you're careful, but I don't work with American BC so maybe it is, but either way, the result is the same, nice straight up and down icing.

Exactly.  Sometimes I don't have the right size board or it is a non standard shape and I use a board that is too large.   After frosting and chilling (I use SMBC or ganache), I cut the cardboard flush with the frosted surface with an exacto knife. Make sure the cardboard is not sticking out further than the frosted surface.  Then apply fondant.  HTH.  

Stephanie3 Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 1:18pm
post #24 of 32

I thank you all so much for your helpful tips. I will definitely apply this to my next cake! You guys are great!!

Stephanie3 Posted 8 Aug 2013 , 6:34pm
post #25 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 


Exactly. Meringues go on soft and don't pull the crumbs up. Fill, ice, chill, hot knife to a glassy smooth finish. And no bulging, no bubbles under fondant, sharp edges....sorry, got carried away a bit, just love my meringues!

I just wanted to know if you've ever tried using ccsmbc to ice a cake under fondant? If so, does it hold up well?

AZCouture Posted 8 Aug 2013 , 6:39pm
post #26 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephanie3 

I just wanted to know if you've ever tried using ccsmbc to ice a cake under fondant? If so, does it hold up well?

Cream cheese? Nope, never. Cream cheese meringue bc is a filling only for me. I don't ice with anything ever other than vanilla or plain smbc, I leave the flavorings to the fillings and the cake themselves. 

Stephanie3 Posted 8 Aug 2013 , 6:45pm
post #27 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Cream cheese? Nope, never. Cream cheese meringue bc is a filling only for me. I don't ice with anything ever other than vanilla or plain smbc, I leave the flavorings to the fillings and the cake themselves. 

Wow you're quick!lol! please disregard my pm. do you ever do red velvet cakes? how would you execute this? as it does call for cream cheese frosting.

AZCouture Posted 8 Aug 2013 , 7:06pm
post #28 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stephanie3 

Wow you're quick!lol! please disregard my pm. do you ever do red velvet cakes? how would you execute this? as it does call for cream cheese frosting.

icon_wink.gif RV is a big seller yes, same thing for those. I use a healthy layer if filling in all of my cakes, so there's no sacrifice of flavors for each slice, just because it's only flavored in the filling. CCSMBC is soooooo delicious, but I don't trust CC touching fondant at all, so it remains a filling only option.

Stephanie3 Posted 8 Aug 2013 , 7:18pm
post #29 of 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

icon_wink.gif RV is a big seller yes, same thing for those. I use a healthy layer if filling in all of my cakes, so there's no sacrifice of flavors for each slice, just because it's only flavored in the filling. CCSMBC is soooooo delicious, but I don't trust CC touching fondant at all, so it remains a filling only option.

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!!!! I appreciate your help ever so much. Thank you for not getting irriatted by my questioning and spelling mistakes. My tablet is determined to make me look like a fool today, lol!

AZCouture Posted 8 Aug 2013 , 7:23pm
post #30 of 32

AOh shoot, I flub spelling and grammar all the time when I'm on my phone. And I hit the period when I mean to hit the space bar too, so lots of random. periods. here. and. there...lol.

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