javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 1:47pm
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The bride sent me this wedding cake pic. I'm not sure if it is 2 inch differences (6,8,10,12) or 3 inch.

20 replies
BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 1:49pm
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you cant see the picture but what you really need to know is how many servings she needs.

javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:06pm
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Oh my, sorry...lol

javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:09pm
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake View Post

you cant see the picture but what you really need to know is how many servings she needs.

She needs around 120, but she wants the tiers to look like the pic. She's not worried about having to many servings, since she'll have company in town (she said they are sweet heads). There will be a small grooms cake that will feed around 20-30.

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:23pm
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It's really hard to tell from pics but it looks like 4, 8,10 and 14? or maybe 4, 7, 9, 12and it looks like the second tier up is 6" high. It's gonna be a lot of cake.

javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:34pm
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Thanks! I thought the top and bottom tiers looked wider. I totally forgot to tell you the 12 inch will be a dummy. I guess I should've had that second cup of coffee before jumping on here. I know this sounds dumb, but would you use any type of support system in the bottom tier? This will be my first time using a faux tier.

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:57pm
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no...I would use the SPS system though...Just google it. It's pretty cheap and people swear by it.

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:59pm
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have you used the Wilton wedding cake chart to figure how many servings the other tiers will be? Don't know how you figure servings of a 3 layer...

sixinarow Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 2:59pm
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You don't need a support system IN the 12" dummy. It'll act like a giant cake board for your 9" tier. Just make sure to "glue" it to your base with royal (you could even use non-edible glue since it's a dummy) and start with your internal support system for the 9" tier. Does that make sense?

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:00pm

SIx, how many servings would a 9" 3 layer be?

sixinarow Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:09pm

Yeesh, if you go by the wilton chart, at the bottom is the servings for "other pan depths" and they figure a 1 layer 8" at 9 and a 1 layer 10" at 15, so split the difference at 12. So if a 2-layer 9" is listed at 32, add 12 more, would be 44 servings. Someone please correct me if that's not right!! icon_lol.gif

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:16pm

I did not ever go down that far on the chart...good to know

sixinarow Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:23pm

I don't know if that's right. I was thinking the easiest way to figure it would've been to just divide the 9" in half since it's listed as a 2 layer, but that gives 16 servings instead of the 12 that I figured from the bottom chart. They wouldn't cut it as a 1 layer and a 2 layer, they would just cut it skinnier...but that would give a pretty wafer thin piece of cake. :/  I do 2 layer cake tiers-- can't ya tell?

javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:26pm

I'll probably do a barrel cake for the 10 inch (In the picture it looks like one). That will give me 90 servings, and I can always make the grooms cake a little larger.

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:26pm

I made a layer in a wedding cake 6".When it came time to slice it it was very difficult. The pieces would fall over because they were too tall and very thin. I'm sure there is a proper way to do it. The tall tiers have become very popular

sixinarow Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by javajammer View Post

I'll probably do a barrel cake for the 10 inch (In the picture it looks like one). That will give me 90 servings, and I can always make the grooms cake a little larger.

thumbs_up.gif 

sixinarow Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:30pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake View Post

I made a layer in a wedding cake 6".When it came time to slice it it was very difficult. The pieces would fall over because they were too tall and very thin. I'm sure there is a proper way to do it. The tall tiers have become very popular

I think they're beautiful, I'm just glad I don't have to cut them..it would look like a cake massacre!!

BatterUpCake Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 3:53pm

it exactly was. Luckily it was a very informal reception in a horsearena. The cake was the only pretty thing there...except for the preggo bride of course! lol

javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 4:55pm

AI was thinking of doing two cakes stacked, but with a foam core board between them. I would ice them to look like one tier. This way I could cut the top cake first. I hope this makes since.

sixinarow Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 5:06pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by javajammer View Post

I was thinking of doing two cakes stacked, but with a foam core board between them. I would ice them to look like one tier. This way I could cut the top cake first. I hope this makes since.

yes, it's called an extended tier. you wouldn't need foam core in between if you use sps. You just use the same size sps plate and pillars.so it would be 12" foam dummy, 10"cardboard cake board, 10"cake, 10"sps, 10"cardboard, 10" cake, 8"sps, 8"cardboard, 8"cake, 6' sps, 6"cardboard, 6"cake.

 

If it's going to be this big and have an extended tier --  I strongly STRONGLY recommend sps, it'll save you a lot of worrying!!

javajammer Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 5:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by sixinarow View Post

yes, it's called an extended tier. you wouldn't need foam core in between if you use sps. You just use the same size sps plate and pillars.so it would be 12" foam dummy, 10"cardboard cake board, 10"cake, 10"sps, 10"cardboard, 10" cake, 8"sps, 8"cardboard, 8"cake, 6' sps, 6"cardboard, 6"cake.

 

If it's going to be this big and have an extended tier --  I strongly STRONGLY recommend sps, it'll save you a lot of worrying!!

Thanks! I'll head out and get the sps system today.

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