Rolling Pins???

Decorating By MoniCakes7818 Updated 11 Feb 2015 , 2:47am by MBalaska

MoniCakes7818 Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 7:40pm
post #1 of 20

Hi All,

I was in the market for a new rolling pin. I work a lot with fondant and have been seeing a lot of "tutrial" videos that are using a "Sil-Pin" that's the silicone cover pin. I think it's super cool and would like to use it, but wanted to know if you recommend an one over the other.

I'm currently using a plain wilton 20" one with no handles, but it seems like the handles would be easier to use once i have no more "arm length" LOL

 

Any imput would definately help me out.

 

oh oh one more thing for those who do use the Sil Pin is the basic one with the rod better or do you prefer the one with the ball bearings? and is it worth the $50?

 

 

 

Thanks!

Monica

MoniCakes

19 replies
DeliciousDesserts Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 8:28pm
post #2 of 20

For me, it wasn't worth it.  I purchased the one from Sweet wise along with the mat.  I no longer use the mat but tried to use the pin.  It always has static.  Drives me nuts.

 

Best pin I ever purchased was the Wilton with the rings.  Honestly.  My go to for large cakes is a piece of PVC pipe.  I had my husband take the wilton rings to make sure they would fit!

Smckinney07 Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 9:04pm
post #3 of 20

AYou don't like 'The Mat'? I have been thinking about purchasing one but I am a sucker for anything 'New and Improved' I'm the person ordering from infomercials :)

I use the long Wilton pin and a smaller piece of PVC. With larger cakes I used to have a heck of a time and thought, like you MC, that handles might make it easier. I realized after purchasing a small step stool (I'm 4' 11") that my problem was due to my height (or lack of) also practice helped a lot as well obviously.

SanDiegoBeautifulCakes Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 9:39pm
post #4 of 20

I agree with DeliciousDesserts

We use a large piece of PVC. After cleaning all the ink off of it with some pvc cleaner and then alcohol. I have one that is filled with silicone for the weight and a couple of the solid white plastic ones, along with many french style wooden pins. We also have a marble pin that is so nice for pastry dough, because it stays cold, especially even more so once you put it in the freezer for just a couple minutes. We also have an array of long wooden dowels at different circumference and lengths.

 

Andrew
 

ellavanilla Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 11:42pm
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoniCakes7818 

 

I'm currently using a plain wilton 20" one with no handles, but it seems like the handles would be easier to use once i have no more "arm length" LOL

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks!

Monica

MoniCakes

 

 

the handles only lessen your pressure on whatever you are rolling making it harder to get even pressure and requiring you to work harder. I have a pin with handles and i use it like a handle-less model.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 11:45pm
post #6 of 20

A

Original message sent by Smckinney07

You don't like 'The Mat'?

I realized after purchasing a small step stool (I'm 4' 11") that my problem was due to my height (or lack of) also practice helped a lot as well obviously.

Hate it. I'm a Fondarific user. It works best with fondx & MMF.

Step stool made Huge difference when rolling.

Smckinney07 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 6:16am
post #7 of 20

AI've been using Fondarific lately, and I'm trying Liz M's recipe (from Artisan Cake) tomorrow and I've ordered the plain FondX to try. I started with Satin Ice, but I really don't care for it and Fondarific is almost too soft for me. I like different bands for different things but I'm still searching for that perfect fondant for actual coverage. The stool does help though! Sorry, didn't mean to steal your thread Moni ;) Thanks Delicious Desserts.

morganchampagne Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 6:47am
post #8 of 20

AI just have a large rolling pin with handles. Mostly because for culinary school it was the one we had to buy. It's wood. But I love it

FromScratchSF Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 6:53am
post #9 of 20

I have 3 pins - I have a massive rolling pin with handles I like for rolling pastry and pie dough (bought at restaurant depot), I broke down and used my 50% off coupon at Michaels and bought the Duff pin and I actually like it quite a bit, which has really surprised me.  My other pin?  A 2" diameter wooden dowel from the craft store that's about 30" long.  Seriously.  Best $3 I ever spent.  I hit it with some fine grain sand paper when I got it home and other then that it's been awesome.  If you do this make sure it's untreated wood (contains bad chemicals).

 

Now, I've bought French pins, silicone pins, pins with handles, pins with no handles... and they all get taken back and I keep going back to the ones mentioned above.  I also no longer "roll" my fondant, I stretch it with the pin.  I don't know how else to describe the technique but it is much less work and better on my body.  No more sore hands/wrists, no more hunching, no more straining.

cazza1 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 10:09am
post #10 of 20

I bought a french silpin (i.e. one without handles) but I must confess I have not used it.  I bought 'The Mat" at about the same time and absolutely love it.  I use my old wooden french rolling pin with the mat.  I use Satin Ice and it rolls perfectly with the mat system.

MoniCakes7818 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 1:59pm
post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Smckinney07 

I've been using Fondarific lately, and I'm trying Liz M's recipe (from Artisan Cake) tomorrow and I've ordered the plain FondX to try. I started with Satin Ice, but I really don't care for it and Fondarific is almost too soft for me. I like different bands for different things but I'm still searching for that perfect fondant for actual coverage. The stool does help though!
Sorry, didn't mean to steal your thread Moni icon_wink.gif
Thanks Delicious Desserts.

haha no worries I'm loving all the feed back on everything. I too am using Satin Ice but sometimes i feel like it's too soft or prone to tare. I just ordred some Fondx so hopefully that's better. (fingers crossed).

 

Thank you all for the feed back on the rolling pins. I did get a little discouraged with price and don't think I can bring myself to spend $50+ on it when the one I have now is doing the trick. I am however going to try the step stool. :-)

rica827 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 2:58pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 


Hate it. I'm a Fondarific user. It works best with fondx & MMF.

Step stool made Huge difference when rolling.


DITTO!  Bought The Mat and absolutely hate it. I've used it numerous times too to try and break it in and it's just useless. I use Fondariffic to cover most of my cakes because I find it has superior taste, but it sticks horribly to The Mat. I use the good old Wilton mat from my first cake decorating course. I also use a handled wood rolling pin for cookie dough and crusts. I actually find the opposite of what one user said - I find the handles help me roll more evenly. I also have the Wilton large white pin without handles I use for fondant because it has the rings, but for cookie dough I use handled wood pin.

Custom Cookies Posted 24 Mar 2014 , 9:13pm
post #13 of 20

FYI:  I got a Sil-Pin for Christmas and I liked using it, but it is falling apart already and there is no way to contact the company (Fiesta Products LLC)for a replacement.  I don't know if they went out of business or what, but I searched all over the web and found an email address (which went unanswered) and one phone number (which was disconnected.)  I would not recommend it to anyone.

MBalaska Posted 10 Feb 2015 , 10:41am
post #14 of 20

Where is that rounded edged wood rolling pin for fondant?  I've forgotten the name and can't find the link through a google search.  (Not a French pie crust roller)

shanter Posted 11 Feb 2015 , 12:17am
post #15 of 20

@MBalaska, Is this the one you mean?

http://caketrick.com/

 

It's expensive, but I know a lot of people swear by it.

costumeczar Posted 11 Feb 2015 , 12:54am
post #16 of 20

I use a good, heavy French pin like the one third from the bottom here. (French pin 20"). It's heavy, which is good for rolling fondant, and has no ball bearings, which can eventually start leaking oil all over the place. http://www.kitchenconservatory.com/rolling-pins-c378.aspx

MBalaska Posted 11 Feb 2015 , 12:55am
post #17 of 20

Quote:

Originally Posted by shanter 
 

@MBalaska, Is this the one you mean?

http://caketrick.com/

 

It's expensive, but I know a lot of people swear by it.

Oh snap! you smart little fluffy mouse, what a memory.  No matter how I searched I could not find it.  Thank you.  I need a wood rolling pin for the Springerle cookies, and I figured that this fondant rolling pin would work for both.  What else is our extra cash for?  Who needs to make a car payment or a house payment when you can buy kitchen toys :razz:

 

http://caketrick.com/

shanter Posted 11 Feb 2015 , 1:32am
post #18 of 20

@MBalaska, I must confess, I knew what you were talking about, but I had to ask a  friend whom I thought had one and I was right. She told me. :-)  (by the way: hamster)

kazita Posted 11 Feb 2015 , 1:55am
post #19 of 20

ALol I too thought you were a mouse...Shanter....sorry my bad!!

MBalaska Posted 11 Feb 2015 , 2:46am
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 
 

I use a good, heavy French pin like the one third from the bottom here. (French pin 20"). It's heavy, which is good for rolling fondant, and has no ball bearings, which can eventually start leaking oil all over the place. http://www.kitchenconservatory.com/rolling-pins-c378.aspx

 

my apologies to the hamster lol.

 

does the curved French pin work with rolling guide strips to make a flat dough ready for cut outs.

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