Fondant Question

Decorating By lapetitechef Updated 5 Aug 2013 , 8:40pm by giggles100788

lapetitechef Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 7:30pm
post #1 of 16

So, I'm totally new to fondant.  I know that if you steam it, it will leave a beautiful shine, but is there any other way to get that shine?  I do not have a steamer.  I made marshmallow fondant so I dont know if that makes a difference.  

 

Thanks!

15 replies
giggles100788 Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 7:50pm
post #2 of 16

Before I got my steamer, I used a small iron that i had with a steam setting and just pressed the steam button over and over to make the iron release the steam and give my cakes that nice shine! Just make sure the keep the iron a good distance away from your cake, you don't want it melting anything. Hope this helps!!
 

AZCouture Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 7:53pm
post #3 of 16

AAre you making a purse cake that needs to be shiny like patent leather? Cause honestly, most times shiny fondant is not a desired look. We do what we can to make sure it's not shiny. Applying luster dust for sparkle, sure, in some cases that's great.

aem1029 Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 8:14pm
post #4 of 16

I agree AZ...I cannot stand that look!  I cringe when I watch Cake Boss because they do all their cakes that way it seems.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 8:23pm
post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

Are you making a purse cake that needs to be shiny like patent leather? Cause honestly, most times shiny fondant is not a desired look. We do what we can to make sure it's not shiny. Applying luster dust for sparkle, sure, in some cases that's great.

 

That's exactly what it looks like!  I say that every time I see it.  

lapetitechef Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 8:25pm
post #6 of 16

I thought the look was desired, you know because of Cake Boss, I personally think a matte look is better myself, so I will stick with my feelings unless the shiny look is specifically requested or would make it look better, ie, like a leather purse look. 

 

Thanks to all of you for your advice!

 

I do have another question, the cake I am making is due for delivery next friday afternoon.  I am icing it in buttercream, but am using fondant for some embellishments. Do I let them sit out uncovered and dry, or do I cover them?  I have NEVER used fondant before, so this is all new to me.  I made a marshmallow fondant.

CakeGeekUk Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 9:07pm
post #7 of 16

I cover mine with a cake umbrella or if I have a huge area of decorations to cover, I use a breathable fabric like chiffon or voile.  Hope this helps!

lapetitechef Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 10:36pm
post #8 of 16

AIs that for the whole cake, or just for some "toppers"? All I have is some toppers

lapetitechef Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 1:47am
post #9 of 16

AHow would I keep this stored until it is placed on the cake for delivery in one week?? It is made from marshmallow fondant.

Do I wrap it, cover it, or let it sit out uncovered?? I have other little pieces like this that are going on the cake as well.

[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3069028/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

BatterUpCake Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 2:51am
post #10 of 16

I just stick them in a ziplock bag

sixinarow Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 2:58am
post #11 of 16

I keep them on a cooling rack lined with wax paper until I use them. Make sure they're completely dry if you decide to put them in a ziplock bag, otherwise, they'll all stick together and be a big lump of mess.

lapetitechef Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 11:34am
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by sixinarow 

I keep them on a cooling rack lined with wax paper until I use them. Make sure they're completely dry if you decide to put them in a ziplock bag, otherwise, they'll all stick together and be a big lump of mess.

sixinarow: do you cover at all?

as you wish Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 11:58am
post #13 of 16

AYou need to cover your fondant pieces to protect them from dust, etc. but unless they are completely dry (which is difficult this time of year with the humidity in most places) you do not want to put them in something airtight. You can leave them on whatever you have them on and just cover them with a clean, lightweight tea towel. If the pieces are really fragile, though, it would be better to store them in a cardboard cake box so they are covered but don't have any weight on them at all.

sixinarow Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 12:49pm
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lapetitechef 

sixinarow: do you cover at all?

The first 24 hours, no. After they're dry enough to pick-up, remove the waxed paper from the cooling rack (put your pieces back on the rack) and lay a piece of parchment paper on top of them. It doesn't stick, it's light so it doesn't squash details and it doesn't have fibers like paper towels that can get stuck in the fondant. It allows air get to them from the underside by way of the cooling rack to help completely dry them. I live in a very humid area, so I need that extra air to help them dry!!

lapetitechef Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 4:31pm
post #15 of 16

So the pieces of fondant i created have dried way too much.  And i still have until Friday for the cake delivery!  How can I rehydrate (so to say) these cutout pieces so that they are more flexible.  I need them to have some flex when i put them on the cake. 

giggles100788 Posted 5 Aug 2013 , 8:40pm
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by lapetitechef 

So the pieces of fondant i created have dried way too much.  And i still have until Friday for the cake delivery!  How can I rehydrate (so to say) these cutout pieces so that they are more flexible.  I need them to have some flex when i put them on the cake. 


You may be able to pop them in the microwave for a second...and i mean a second to try and soften them or maybe rubbing them with some shortening.  But other then that im not sure what you can use to rehydrate pieces that are already finished.  Just be careful not to break them while trying to fit them on the cake.

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