What Is The Difference Between Buttermilk Frosting And Buttermilk Icing?

Decorating By evobaker Updated 12 Aug 2013 , 4:52am by AZCouture

evobaker Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 10:22pm
post #1 of 20

I;m going to make cupcakes and will use fondant. My friends advise me to use buttermilk before fondant but then I get confuse between Icing and frosting. I don't know which one to buy.

 

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19 replies
LIllybell23 Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 3:57pm
post #2 of 20

icing and frosting are the same as far as I know but I have never heard of buttermilk icing... Are you sure you aren't thinking of butter cream? 
 

evobaker Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 4:29pm
post #3 of 20

ASorry what i mean is buttercream. I'm planning to make cupcakes and use marshmallow fondant on top of it but then i need to put some buttercream but i'm confuse between frosting and icing. Could u please tell me whats best to use?

Marielijah Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 5:10pm
post #4 of 20

I agree with LillyBell...  IMHO - icing and frosting are the same.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 6:25pm
post #5 of 20

AIcing & frosting are not the same thing.

Icing does not contain the fat (butter or shortening) that frosting does.

Sassyzan Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 7:02pm
post #6 of 20

A

Original message sent by DeliciousDesserts

Icing & frosting are not the same thing.

Icing does not contain the fat (butter or shortening) that frosting does.

Says who?

Dayti Posted 1 Aug 2013 , 7:22pm
post #7 of 20

The difference between icing and frosting also depends on where you're from. In the UK, for example, cakes/cupcakes are iced with icing, although the word frosting is generally understood also. 

LIllybell23 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 1:15am
post #8 of 20

Yeah I think it just depends on where you are from.  Any basic butter cream will work under marshmallow fondant.  I use 1 lb. butter and 2 lb.s powdered sugar and about 2 T water this is a basic american recipe and works well as a base under fondant if you want it to be a little more stable in heat and humidity you can use shortening in place of the butter I don't think it tastes as good as it does with butter though.  There are other  butter creams that are a little trickier to make that use meringues in them (swiss meringue butter cream, Italian meringue butter cream etc.)  But the american is easiest to make and pretty reliable.  Hope this helps.
 

howsweet Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 3:56am
post #9 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

Icing & frosting are not the same thing.

Icing does not contain the fat (butter or shortening) that frosting does.


This is what I was taught.

Annabakescakes Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 4:06am
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 

Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

Icing & frosting are not the same thing.

Icing does not contain the fat (butter or shortening) that frosting does.


This is what I was taught.

I always thought that "frosting" was the light, fluffier airier item and "icing" for the denser, less airy stuff. 

 

Like frosting comes in a can, and you can't smooth it to save your life. Icing is smoothable. <---- not a word

 

 

 
lorieleann Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 8:58pm
post #11 of 20

i guess i always thought of icing as the powder sugar and milk thin paste that is drizzled on sugar cookies. Frosting is the thicker stuff that has the fat.  But while I will use the two words interchangeably for buttercream, i do not call the thin coating frosting. that is always icing.  I do think that it is a regional thing, and that the distinction is becoming lost. 

Annabakescakes Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 9:13pm
post #12 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann 

i guess i always thought of icing as the powder sugar and milk thin paste that is drizzled on sugar cookies. Frosting is the thicker stuff that has the fat.  But while I will use the two words interchangeably for buttercream, i do not call the thin coating frosting. that is always icing.  I do think that it is a regional thing, and that the distinction is becoming lost. 

I don't use them interchangeably, and I call that stuff liquidy stuff on donuts, sugar cookies, and bundt cakes a "glaze". lol, I am very technical in my icing/frosting/glaze beliefs. ;-) 

ttaunt Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 10:58pm
post #13 of 20

thought it was called glaze on doughnuts

lorieleann Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 4:17am
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 

I don't use them interchangeably, and I call that stuff liquidy stuff on donuts, sugar cookies, and bundt cakes a "glaze". lol, I am very technical in my icing/frosting/glaze beliefs. ;-) 

 

 

in my world (welcome icon_rolleyes.gif)  there is also glaze on donuts and bundt cakes.  The icing on cookies is much thicker than what is on a donut. I'll double dip with drying between on the sugar cookies so that there is an opaque coating that isn't sticky like a donut.  and royal is icing, too.  

DeliciousDesserts Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 11:25am
post #15 of 20

A

Original message sent by Sassyzan

Says who?

Ummm. That was me. See, it says "Delicious Desserts." That's how ya know who wrote it. *snicker*

DeliciousDesserts Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 11:27am
post #16 of 20

A

Original message sent by lorieleann

in my world (welcome :roll: )  there is also glaze on donuts and bundt cakes.  The icing on cookies is much thicker than what is on a donut.

So glad you wrote that! For me, glaze is for donuts, icing is for cookies, & frosting is for cakes.

howsweet Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 9:50pm
post #17 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann 

i guess i always thought of icing as the powder sugar and milk thin paste that is drizzled on sugar cookies. Frosting is the thicker stuff that has the fat.  But while I will use the two words interchangeably for buttercream, i do not call the thin coating frosting. that is always icing.  I do think that it is a regional thing, and that the distinction is becoming lost. 


For me a glaze would be icing that was thinned down with a liquid.

Annabakescakes Posted 3 Aug 2013 , 9:52pm
post #18 of 20

Well, I am glad we cleared that up! lol

evobaker Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 4:17am
post #19 of 20

AThanks for your inputs! Have a great day of baking ^_^

AZCouture Posted 12 Aug 2013 , 4:52am
post #20 of 20

AAnd icing means fondant to a whole lot of people.

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