LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:32pm
post #1 of

So, I don't know why exactly, but I seem to be getting more people who feel the need to tell me not only that they are going with someone else, but how much the other business is charging them for the cake. For example, I send them a quote of $200 for a two tier, fairly detailed birthday cake with fondant accents, gum paste topper, etc. They respond with "We found someone who will do it for $80." Ok, good for you??? 

 

My question is, should I even respond to this? Usually, if someone responds to a quote that it's out of their budget, but thanks for the quote, I will just respond with a "Ok, thanks for letting us know!" because I really do appreciate when someone takes the time to write back instead of just getting *crickets* after I send a quote. BUT, when someone responds like that, telling me how they found it so much cheaper, it kind of irritates me and makes me wonder if they are expecting me to say "OH, well in that case, we'll do it for $75!!!" Which will never happen of course. Or are they just not so subtly trying to imply that we're overpriced? 

 

I guess I should just reply with the same "Ok, thanks for letting us know!" that I always do. But the stubborn streak in me just doesn't even want to dignify it with a response. icon_razz.gif

41 replies
Stitches Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:37pm
post #2 of

I wouldn't respond! They're telling you what they bought that for, thinking you should listen to them and follow that other decorator and charge "reasonable" prices. To explain to them why your prices are what they are is a lost cause, you're not going to win them over. Seek different customers all together!!

jason_kraft Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:14pm
post #3 of

A

Original message sent by LoveMeSomeCake615

I guess I should just reply with the same "Ok, thanks for letting us know!" that I always do.

The professional thing to do is to reply, I would reply with something like "Thanks for following up! I wish you the best of luck with your event, and please let me know if we can serve you in the future."

Godot Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:19pm
post #4 of

AOr, you could respond like this: "Oh well done! Wow - less than half the price! Please do send a photograph so I can make contribution to cakewrecks.com".

MimiFix Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:21pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


The professional thing to do is to reply, I would reply with something like "Thanks for following up! I wish you the best of luck with your event, and please let me know if we can serve you in the future."

 

Very nice, Jason. That's a good cut 'n paste response. I agree, it's important to always be professional.

MimiFix Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:22pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godot 

Or, you could respond like this: "Oh well done! Wow - less than half the price! Please do send a photograph so I can make contribution to cakewrecks.com".

Yup, you can think this, but use Jason's cut 'n paste.

SanDiegoBeautifulCakes Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:34pm
post #7 of

I like the response from Jason. Very nice, pleasant and professional, and puts your name in their mind as being such. I would think they will be contacting you in the future.

 

Always be pleasant, nice and professional no matter what.

 

Andrew
 

howsweet Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:54pm
post #8 of

I agree, Jason's reply is a keeper. Sometimes I think people want to say they got it cheaper, but come just short of blurting it out.  I just got this one, "Thank you, but I have someone who is going to make my cakes".   Is it just me, or is that odd phrasing? To me, it almost sounds like I was calling her out of the blue and trying to get her to order a cake. And she didn't have to tell it it was cheaper, I knew it anyway.
 

ellavanilla Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 7:16pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitches 

I wouldn't respond! They're telling you what they bought that for, thinking you should listen to them and follow that other decorator and charge "reasonable" prices. To explain to them why your prices are what they are is a lost cause, you're not going to win them over. Seek different customers all together!!

 

yeah, i agree. she's telling you that she got a better deal because she thinks you're overcharging and wants to "one up" you. Always be professional. It costs you nothing and you've set your reputation on that.

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 7:46pm

I hope her cake sucks....is that wrong?

Apti Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 7:46pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


The professional thing to do is to reply, I would reply with something like "Thanks for following up! I wish you the best of luck with your event, and please let me know if we can serve you in the future."

Also agree with this response.  Type it up, paste it on the phone, whatever it takes.  ALWAYS be professional.

osorio Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 7:59pm

AI agree with Jason.

I read this somewhere: " Good cake isn't cheap, cheap cake isn't good"

howsweet Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 8:07pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by osorio 

I agree with Jason.

I read this somewhere: " Good cake isn't cheap, cheap cake isn't good"


If only that were true. There are plenty of people selling good cake for cheap.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 8:20pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godot 

Or, you could respond like this: "Oh well done! Wow - less than half the price! Please do send a photograph so I can make contribution to cakewrecks.com".

HAHAHAHA! icon_biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


The professional thing to do is to reply, I would reply with something like "Thanks for following up! I wish you the best of luck with your event, and please let me know if we can serve you in the future."

Yeah, yeah, whatever Jason. Stop being all objective and stuff. icon_wink.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by SanDiegoBeautifulCakes 

I like the response from Jason. Very nice, pleasant and professional, and puts your name in their mind as being such. I would think they will be contacting you in the future.

 

Always be pleasant, nice and professional no matter what.

 

Andrew
 

I would never respond in a snarky or unprofessional way. You should hear me talking to customers, even when they're being super rude to me! I am ALWAYS professional and polite with the customer. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 


If only that were true. There are plenty of people selling good cake for cheap.

SO true. We have a lot of them in my city. thumbsdown.gif

Sweetface421 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 3:03pm

AI've been following this thread and lo & behold this morning... I get an email fom a client (whom I had been working with closely - consultation, countless emails, contract sent) for a very busy weekend in Oct. saying that a friend of theirs offered to make the cake I designed for them as a "gift." Um, yeah. Good luck with that.

Just had to share :/

tracyaem Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 3:55pm

I would also respond with Jason's wording.

 

I also think some people use this as a bargaining tool. They really don't have someone lined up to make it for the cheaper price, but they're seeing if you are willing to come down at all. I had someone do that once and I politely wrote back "best of luck with your event, keep us in mind for future occassions, yadda yadda". A week later they emailed that their other baker "fell through" and could I still do it? I'm fairly certain there was no other baker and since I held firm on my price, I wound up getting it.

 

I don't know... maybe it's b/c this is not my main source of income, but my philosophy is that my price is set and it reflects the value of time spent away from my family. If someone doesn't want to pay it, then I'd rather have those hours free. I don't feel bad at all when someone says no because of price. If they say no because they don't like my cake or design, that's a different story.

Phaedramax Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 5:29pm

I would ask who they ( if they will tell you ) are and check them out as to quality and expertise's.Then you need to re think your prices or say "You get what you pay for that is if you think you are better them they are.or My cakes aren't for everyone!
 

Sweetface421 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 5:58pm

Pheadramax, I have thought about responding to her and letting her know that the design she wants requires someone with a high level of skill IF she wants the cake to have that "Wow!" factor that she claimed she wanted.

The design was to be a "Rival Stadiums" cake - one side of the cake made to look like Neyland stadium and the other half was Rupp stadium in KY. Made to serve around 100. BIG cake.

 

Yep, she's getting a Cakewrecks sheetcake, I can see it now.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 6:37pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phaedramax 

I would ask who they ( if they will tell you ) are and check them out as to quality and expertise's.Then you need to re think your prices or say "You get what you pay for that is if you think you are better them they are.or My cakes aren't for everyone!
 

Well, I already know our prices are where they need to be so I don't feel I need to rethink them, and I'm pretty sure no matter what the other person's skill, I don't need to try to match a price of $80 for a detailed two tier cake. icon_wink.gif

AZCouture Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 7:32pm

A$80 for a two tiered cake? Yeesh. Not worth my time. Dang when are people gonna start factoring in all the time they spend into their pricing? Sorry, but I can't turn a profit emailing, talking on phone, designing, and THEN actually making and delivering ANY cake for $80.

BatterUpCake Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 7:35pm

because newbies..myself included at first.. think that anything over actual cash spent is profit.

AZCouture Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 7:35pm

AAnd I sincerely hope no one tells customers that theyget what they pay for. Writing a blog ppost about quality and what you get for the money you pay is one thing, but actually saying that to a person you're communicating with is tacky with a capital T.

AZCouture Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 7:36pm

A

Original message sent by BatterUpCake

because newbies..myself included at first.. think that anything over actual cash spent is profit.

Yes, well, you're getting there...lol.

BatterUpCake Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 7:50pm

It's a process...learning from the school of hard knocks. I never realized just how much time I would spend doing dishes and cleaning counters, sweeping and mopping floors. No dishwasher in the kitchen I use so I/m getting dishwasher hands...lol

CakeRae80 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 8:27pm

I agree with what Jason typed, I think it's nice to acknowledge them that you got their email and wish them luck and remind them to remember you in the future.  It is nice when they respond back to you.  I've had two people who never responded back so far.  Which if it comes to the point where I can't do it because of short notice, I don't have a problem telling them that.  I just think it's rude b/c to sit down and give quotes on a few cake options that they want isn't a minute job.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 8:59pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZCouture 

$80 for a two tiered cake? Yeesh. Not worth my time. Dang when are people gonna start factoring in all the time they spend into their pricing? Sorry, but I can't turn a profit emailing, talking on phone, designing, and THEN actually making and delivering ANY cake for $80.

I know, right??

Quote:
Originally Posted by BatterUpCake 

 No dishwasher in the kitchen I use so I/m getting dishwasher hands...lol

Hmmm, in that case, maybe you should work the cost of getting manicures into your cake prices! icon_wink.gif

BatterUpCake Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 9:10pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615 

I know, right??

Hmmm, in that case, maybe you should work the cost of getting manicures into your cake prices! icon_wink.gif

Like!!

embersmom Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 10:44pm

I don't have my own business, but every so often I'll make a cake and/or cupcakes for friends or my husband's coworkers for the cost of the ingredients.  Doesn't bother me one bit as I consider it to be practice for doing techniques I don't use at work :)   One of my husband's coworkers asked me if I'd be interested in making a dinosaur cake for her son's birthday in a couple of weeks.  Today she told my husband that her mother intervened and said that no, she'd get a cake from "somewhere else" because it would be cheaper than to pay me for the ingredients.

 

?!?!?

 

icon_eek.gif
 

ellavanilla Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 10:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by embersmom 

I don't have my own business, but every so often I'll make a cake and/or cupcakes for friends or my husband's coworkers for the cost of the ingredients.  Doesn't bother me one bit as I consider it to be practice for doing techniques I don't use at work :)   One of my husband's coworkers asked me if I'd be interested in making a dinosaur cake for her son's birthday in a couple of weeks.  Today she told my husband that her mother intervened and said that no, she'd get a cake from "somewhere else" because it would be cheaper than to pay me for the ingredients.

 

?!?!?

 

icon_eek.gif
 

 

I think we can all agree that wherever that cake comes from, it won't meet a single standard of the bakers here on CC...

embersmom Posted 2 Aug 2013 , 11:53pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellavanilla 

 

I think we can all agree that wherever that cake comes from, it won't meet a single standard of the bakers here on CC...

 



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