cuppycakez Posted 30 Jul 2013 , 11:12pm

AHello ladies i need help 1: i dont know if i undercharged for this cake its a 6"8"10" .. 4" high i charged $80. 2: does the size i am doing serve 50ppl 3:i need a timeline as when i need to start baking ,crumbcoat,frost,fill,fondant,and deco. when i do cakes for my fam i usually just do bake it friday night then early sat morning do the rest. Is yhat right or am i soppesed to let the cake sit for a while or what im lost please help ladies i dont want to mess this up since this is my first "real" costumer. Its not letting me upload the pic to this so.please can you check it out in my pictures . Itsthe only pic its cheetah 3tier please and thank you

30 replies
cuppycakez Posted 30 Jul 2013 , 11:14pm

A[URL]http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3067701/default/sort/display_order/#[/URL] heres the cake link finally found how to do it lol

cuppycakez Posted 30 Jul 2013 , 11:14pm

A[URL]http://cakecentral.com/g/i/3067701/default/sort/display_order/#[/URL] heres the cake link finally found how to do it lol

IAmPamCakes Posted 30 Jul 2013 , 11:20pm

AA 6 & 10" will serve 50, Wilton servings (the industry standard). For 50 servings of cake, I would charge $200 for basic fondant. So yes, you WAY undercharged IMO. A 6, 8, & 10" will serve 74. For pricing, find Jason Kraft. He has great information about pricing, overhead, starting a business, etc.

shebysuz Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 4:56am

I do not understand how anyone can think a 6-8-10 will feed 74!  or how a 6 & a 10 can feed 50...but then again what do I know, I am a fatgirl trapped in a skinny body and I loves me some cake

IAmPamCakes Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:09am

AOh, I'm a cake lover too, but if you actually see a properly sliced piece of cake (2"x1"x4") it's actually a good size serving. I had to cut the cake I made for a party this weekend, and I actually cut smaller pieces. They were mostly for kids, but nobody complained or had seconds. (not because my cake sucked, either) Those servings are industry standard sizes for servings.

bubs1stbirthday Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:16am
Quote:
Originally Posted by shebysuz 

I do not understand how anyone can think a 6-8-10 will feed 74!  or how a 6 & a 10 can feed 50...but then again what do I know, I am a fatgirl trapped in a skinny body and I loves me some cake

Lol - I love this 'fat girl trapped in a skinny body' - I wish, thanks to a little bubba who gave to me the inability to drag my butt far from home during my pregnancy and who now gives me the time to bake (and eat) and therefore a new found love of baking I am definitely suffering from the opposite. icon_smile.gif

 

Cuppcakez if I were you I would aim to get it all done the day before - then you will have time to allow for any muck ups etc that are bound to happen with this being your first paying client.

ellavanilla Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:18am
Quote:
Originally Posted by shebysuz 

I do not understand how anyone can think a 6-8-10 will feed 74!  or how a 6 & a 10 can feed 50...but then again what do I know, I am a fatgirl trapped in a skinny body and I loves me some cake

 

gotta cut it right.

 

here's a great graphic 

http://www.dailyweddingplanningtip.com/wedding-cakes/how-much-wedding-cake-will-you-need/

cuppycakez Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:42am

AThanks :) and the girl wanted whipped cream with strawberry but ppl told meit will soak the cake so what can i do to prevent tha?

Apti Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:24am
Quote:
Originally Posted by cuppycakez 

Thanks icon_smile.gif and the girl wanted whipped cream with strawberry but ppl told meit will soak the cake so what can i do to prevent tha?


cuppycakez~~I sent you a detailed private message for your opening post. 

 

Re:  whipped cream and strawberry--YOU are the baker and YOU need to let the customer know what IS and IS NOT possible.  There are limitations to every aspect of cake decorating.  Whipped cream and fresh strawberries sure do taste good, but they may be almost impossible for different cake construction styles.

Apti Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:27am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ellavanilla 

 

gotta cut it right.

 

here's a great graphic 

http://www.dailyweddingplanningtip.com/wedding-cakes/how-much-wedding-cake-will-you-need/


Ellavanilla~~Good graphic, thanks for posting.  (Personally, even though I now know "how to cut Wilton wedding sized servings", I think getting 14 servings out of a 6" cake is kinda funny.....)

Godot Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:40am

ASeriously- you took an order for a cake (meaning you are now a business) and you don't know any of these basics?

Maybe you should stick to making cakes for family and close friends until you have these very basic routines in place - then start taking orders from 'real' clients.

Yes- I am a big meany-pants and a dream-crusher (as another CCer so aptly put it), but you need to know these basics!

RubinaD Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 6:55am

ACute cake. I would bake all the cake on thursday, decorate on Friday and deliver on saturday. I do not freeze my cakes as a lot of people do. Have you made fondant covered cakes before? Strawberries and fresh cream are an awesome combination, however not in a stacked cake. You could put strawberries or any fresh fruit, but do you have space in your fridge to accomodate, also i never put fondant covered cakes in the fridge. If you still need some help please ask. Good luck.

carmijok Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 8:39am

A

Original message sent by Godot

Seriously- you took an order for a cake (meaning you are now a business) and you don't know any of these basics?

Maybe you should stick to making cakes for family and close friends until you have these very basic routines in place - then start taking orders from 'real' clients.

Yes- I am a big meany-pants and a dream-crusher (as another CCer so aptly put it), but you need to know these basics!

What she said. And I'm always suspicious of posts like this anyway. I'm wearing my meany-pants too!

Lucky6 Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 9:02am

A

Original message sent by Godot

Seriously- you took an order for a cake (meaning you are now a business) and you don't know any of these basics?

Maybe you should stick to making cakes for family and close friends until you have these very basic routines in place - then start taking orders from 'real' clients.

Yes- I am a big meany-pants and a dream-crusher (as another CCer so aptly put it), but you need to know these basics!

I'm with you and carmijok I find this post suspicious she's asking for advice on every single step of cake making

Godot Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 9:45am

AI'm not suspicious, just WTF!!!!

Get your ducks in a row -- THEN go into business.

CakeChemistry Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 10:57am

ASometimes people make great cakes as a hobby for family and friends and then with all the oooohs and aaahhhhs and 'you could make a business out of this' go ahead and take a 'real' order. It's not to say that the person can't do it, just that they are significantly underprepared and also struggling with the basics and in particular the assertiveness needed to deal with some customer's demands. I can see why some of the more experienced/professionals find these scenarios frustrating, but this lady seems a little out of her depth and in need of a little advice and CC is a great place for this. I know I have learnt a lot from everyone on here and my cakes have become better and better in light of this. In reference to the woeful undercharging, yes this is definitely not a decent amount for this cake, however, considering this lady's lack of experience, is probably a good bet whilst she is starting out, as long as she lets the customer know why the price is that low and is honest about being able to/not able to fill all requests in relation to her experience. You don't have to say you have no/little experience, you say 'I'm starting out and need to collate a portfolio, therefore I will just charge you expenses, though future cakes will be at market rate with a discount for returning customers' We all started somewhere! Similarly, to this lady, respect your customer - be honest, (if you havent done something before, say 'oh that is new for me, but ive seen it done and am pretty confident ill be able to do it - only if you are confident you can do it). don't be unrealistic, and think logically about your creative process. Sugar work can be done in advance. Fondant needs drying time before stacking, if you only have one oven, the baking of three tiers needs thinking about, then cooling time etc. also you don't want to be transporting anything with fresh royal or buttercream, particularly in warm weather as it will slide. It needs to set. Balance all this against keeping your cake as fresh as possible. Don't put cream and fresh fruit in it unless you are making a naked cake or a gateau. This is a no no. Hope this helps x my final piece of advice is to use this site, look at other people's cakes and think of the standard you want to achieve and where you are heading with your craft. its all well and good wanting to charge £££££ for a cake because others do but if your quality isnt there you wontget repeat business and negative word of mouth is damaging. read the tutorials, read the conversations, take any advice from people that know. It may sound harsh to have your organisation and expertise questioned or criticised but it will make you better! Lots of luck x x

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 11:12am

I think the fact that she is asking how to do every detailed step is why people are questioning her experience. She posted this twice and on the other thread it was clear she has never used fondant before. It was really poor judgement to take an order when you have never done something before.

 

We do all have to start somewhere....and that somewhere should be practice practice practice...and then get licensed BEFORE taking any orders. Or do whatever your state/city requires...

 

Ok, so what is your plan for stacking this cake? What type of support system are you planning to use? What recipe? You can't use a soft cake for a stacked cake....it needs to be firm.

After torting, filling and crumbcoating you want to let your cake settle or it will do it under the weight of the fondant and will be lumpy. You want to place a thick dam in between layers. This will also help keep your cake from settling under the weight of your fondant....

cuppycakez Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:15pm

AYes i am asking advice because this is my first cake like i said already and i want to make sure i do it right! Theres never any harm in asking. If it bothers you or anybody you dont have to replay!! Every baker has there own way of doing things and i wanted to see. Like for example alot of you guys on here say not to use whipping cream and when i order my cakes for events thats always what i pick for.my fillings and never the baker said no. So thats why i thought it was fine. On the other questions i started asking because i just found this sight and ive seen alot of ppl do it diff. Ways and i started doughting myself. Theres no need to be rude if you do not like or my post gets you angry or anoyyed then simply dont replay.

cuppycakez Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:29pm

AI have worked with fondant i think i said i did . Iv worked with it a couple of times before. but when i have it was cakes for close family and we ate it almost immidietly after i was done making it and so i didnt get to see if after a having sit for a while somthing would happen since after i crumbcoated and all i didnt refridge it for a hour. So thats why i asked . And now i know not to use whipped cream but idk why the ppl i order from have that for an option

cuppycakez Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:33pm

AI started doughting myself when i saw this site and thats why i asked ppl no need to be rude! If this post gets you angry or annoyed simply dont replay. Gosh! Im also 8months preggo and dont need to be dealing qith stuck up rude ppl.

cuppycakez Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:34pm

AAnd thanks to the ppl that understand.

jason_kraft Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:41pm

A

Original message sent by cuppycakez

Im also 8months preggo

What happens to your customer if you go into labor tomorrow?

jennicake Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:43pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky6 


I'm with you and carmijok I find this post suspicious she's asking for advice on every single step of cake making

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by carmijok 


What she said. And I'm always suspicious of posts like this anyway. I'm wearing my meany-pants too!

 

Out of curiousity, why are posts like this "suspicious"?  It's understandable if you think someone is in over their head, but how is it suspicious?  What are you suspicious of?

 

Just curious.  I see that word thrown out a lot.

LoveMeSomeCake615 Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:49pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jennicake 

 

 

 

Out of curiousity, why are posts like this "suspicious"?  It's understandable if you think someone is in over their head, but how is it suspicious?  What are you suspicious of?

 

Just curious.  I see that word thrown out a lot.

I think it usually means they suspect the OP of being a troll and posting something to get a rise out of people. Correct me if I'm wrong, though. 

BatterUpCake Posted 31 Jul 2013 , 5:52pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LoveMeSomeCake615 

I think it usually means they suspect the OP of being a troll and posting something to get a rise out of people. Correct me if I'm wrong, though. 

Seriously??? People do that on here? I see it a lot on political sites but I never would have thought people would do that on a cake page!! lol

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