Smbc Vs. Imbc

Decorating By md21010 Updated 23 Jul 2013 , 8:02pm by kikiandkyle

md21010 Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 5:25pm
post #1 of 9

Which is better to ice cakes with? I've been covering cakes with fondant and havent had much luck with it. So I wanted to try BC but not sure which is the best that will be hold up in heat/humidity/ etc. Any suggestions? Thank you so much!

8 replies
BrendysCakes Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 6:41pm
post #3 of 9

AI live in S Texas and I use Italian meringue buttercream with a 1/2 cup of powdered sugar added at the end for extra stability. I deliver my cakes cold so they hold up to travel. There is a free class on craftsy for Swiss meringue buttercream which is similar to IMBC but easier to make.

ellavanilla Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 6:58pm
post #4 of 9

i find the opposite, IMBC easier to make. both hold up in heat, but not direct sunlight. The color does change a bit, getting darker, if the temperature is above 90. 

lorieleann Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 7:00pm
post #5 of 9

I live in So. AZ and prefer to use SMBC.  I find it easier to make and I get more reliable results (perhaps b/c i have logged more hours doing it the SM way?)  For heat stability, I have subbed out 1/2 of the butter with hi ratio shortening in the SMBC.  

 

For ABC, i usually do 1/3 hi ratio to 2/3 butter.  I like to keep cakes cold for delivery and I also request that cakes not be kept out in the heat due to melting. 

 

i think that what kind of heat/humidity and your customer's expectations will determine what you are going to use. I think that in the very hot climates (desert areas) where people live 24/7 with AC, there isn't an expectation that a cake will be left outside (nothing is expected to be outside...it's too darn hot!!!) so buttercreams that have temperature requirements are respected. But other places where summer=outside events no matter what, then you will need to go to something that doesn't have meltable ingredients, like an all shortening recipe.  

AZCouture Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 7:11pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann 

 I think that in the very hot climates (desert areas) where people live 24/7 with AC, there isn't an expectation that a cake will be left outside (nothing is expected to be outside...it's too darn hot!!!) so buttercreams that have temperature requirements are respected.

I laugh when people ask me how I get away with using SMBC during the summer, because it's really a no brainer from my point of view. It's no different than any other time of year, really. The cakes are produced in air conditioned rooms, moved to an air conditioned vehicle, and assembled in another air conditioned room. There are not outdoor functions past June, and if there are, the cake ain't outside! 

didi5 Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 7:27pm
post #7 of 9

I started using SMBC but now I make IMBC.  Tastewise they taste the same coz they have the same ingredients.  And both are same in terms of stability.  I prefer to use IMBC because I just find it faster to make.  Maybe it's just me but I find that the meringue in IMBC cools faster that SMBC, I am quite impatient, lol.  I think it's really just a matter of personal preference.  

ellavanilla Posted 23 Jul 2013 , 7:54pm
post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by didi5 

I started using SMBC but now I make IMBC.  Tastewise they taste the same coz they have the same ingredients.  And both are same in terms of stability.  I prefer to use IMBC because I just find it faster to make.  Maybe it's just me but I find that the meringue in IMBC cools faster that SMBC, I am quite impatient, lol.  I think it's really just a matter of personal preference.  

if i'm in a hurry i add one pound of cold butter and one pound of room temp butter :D

kikiandkyle Posted 23 Jul 2013 , 8:02pm
post #9 of 9

AIf you heat the eggs in your kitchenaid bowl then whip them (smbc) vs heating the sugar in a pan and adding it to the cold kitchenaid bowl to whip (imbc) then it will take longer to cool because the bowl needs to cool too.

The thing I don't like about imbc is pouring in the sugar because I always splash it on the whisk and get the little sugar shards.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%