Walmart Decorators

Decorating By rdjr Updated 6 Jun 2014 , 10:54pm by shellyl3

MimiFix Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 3:42pm
post #31 of 75

After reading through all the posts in this thread: I think you've been adopted! Please let us know how it works out. 

lunawhisper0013 Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 4:16pm
post #32 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by embersmom 


OMG, that's a generous amount of time...icon_eek.gif 

And, yet most of the decorators I worked with STILL couldn't manage to do it.  As I said before, Walmart is short on talented decorators or even competent decorators, I am sorry to say.

kikiandkyle Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 4:21pm
post #33 of 75

AI wish any of the grocery stores near me were hiring, I really want to get the speed production experience. Congrats OP!

Laurieg Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 4:48pm
post #34 of 75

Oh my dear boy,

I have been a decorator for 11 years at Walmart.  I would absolutely kill for you to work at my store.  Without tooting my own horn, I am one of the best decorators they have. I have been to the home office twice for winning internal contests.  If you can breath, they will make you a decorator. No experience necessary. It has been my biggest exasperation that they think they can pull anyone in off the street and make them a decorator.  All you have to do is go to an interview that asks you pc questions that have nothing to do with decorating. you bring it up because they cannot. Be sure you tell them all qualifications, skills, etc. in order to get the best salary. They will jump on hiring you if they have a slot! We are VERY hard to come by, therfore you are in the driver seat. As for the job, personally I have been fortunate to work in stores that realized how much money I could bring in and they let me do whatever I could within the perameters of what I had to work with (equipment, cake sizes,etc). A wise manager put it well, "I could be as creative as I had time for".  I hope this helps and I hope to see you in Bentonville.

embersmom Posted 12 Jul 2013 , 10:38pm
post #35 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by lunawhisper0013 

And, yet most of the decorators I worked with STILL couldn't manage to do it.  As I said before, Walmart is short on talented decorators or even competent decorators, I am sorry to say.

 



In my [cough] number of years in this business I've met very few decorators who can meet "optimal production", myself included.  The few who can have some sort of inexplicable talent of being able to combine speed and eye for design.  It's a rare gift.  I can't tell you how many tips and tricks I've picked up over the years, and I still have issues with it!

rdjr Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 11:11pm
post #36 of 75

Hello everyone, just an update. I got called today to go to orientation tomorrow, I will let everyone know how it goes!

Baking Sis Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 11:12pm
post #37 of 75

Good luck to you; hope your day goes smoothly!

kaylawaylalayla Posted 17 Jul 2013 , 11:38pm
post #38 of 75

A

Original message sent by lunawhisper0013

And, yet most of the decorators I worked with STILL couldn't manage to do it.  As I said before, Walmart is short on talented decorators or even competent decorators, I am sorry to say.

I thought she was being sarcastic when she said generous.

rockymtnbaker Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 1:35am
post #39 of 75

Since this original post was over a week ago, this will probably not be relevant for the OP. However, there may be someone reading that might glean something from my post so here ya go. 

When interviewing at a grocery store bakery (Walmart, Kroger, Costco, Sam's Club, etc.) the main thing they want to see is SPEED. I interviewed at a Sam's several years ago where I had to ice and simply decorate a sheet cake to show my skill. While they loved my cake, they said I was just too slow; I was trying to be as fast as I could, but I was (as I typically did) decorating a product I could feel proud to serve. It took me about 5-8 minutes to ice the cake, do a simple border, an icing rose, and write happy birthday on the top, and it wasn't fast enough for them. 

This is one of the many reasons why we as custom bakers, can offer a superior product to a grocery store;we can actually take the time needed to do the cake THE RIGHT WAY instead of the fast way. 

Just my $.02. icon_wink.gif

 

ETA: I just read the whole thread and saw you got the job..congratulations and good luck! I hope it all works out well for you!

kaylawaylalayla Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 1:41am
post #40 of 75

A5-8 minutes is too slow?! Oh man, I'm feeling blue over this. At school they taught us that 7 minutes was industry standard. I don't thinkni could even very poorly ice a sheet cake in two minutes.

rockymtnbaker Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 1:43am
post #41 of 75

Well, in their defense it was several years ago; please don't take my experience at one store as gospel truth!

girlisrad Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 1:48am
post #42 of 75

I just quit my job as cake decorator at Wally a few months ago. I loved the decorating part... even if there was little room (or time) for cool ideas and what not. But I learned a lot, I learned speed, and I learned to LOVE decorating <3  I miss that job so much. Wal Mart, on the other hand was the hardest part for me :( They no longer take good care of their employees, and it is a struggle to work there. I hope your store is better than mine was!!

 

Either way, good luck! I hope you enjoy your new job! 

rdjr Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 1:49am
post #43 of 75

Thanks everyone for your tips and input! Any tip is always helpful.

embersmom Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 2:19am
post #44 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylawaylalayla 

5-8 minutes is too slow?! Oh man, I'm feeling blue over this. At school they taught us that 7 minutes was industry standard. I don't thinkni could even very poorly ice a sheet cake in two minutes.


I want to say the standard is 5-7 minutes total, including stacking/filling/icing the cake.  YMMV depending on the size of the cake -- there's usualy a few more minutes allotted for a half or full sheet, and a few more minutes on top of that for a special order.  "Few" depends on the chain's production timetable.

 

At one of my old employers we weren't allowed to put a top border on a "case" cake -- that saved a minute or two. The "allowed" designs were very simple.  Rosebuds were OK; actual roses-on-a-nail were discouraged unless you could make them fast.  Balloons and daisies (the kind where you just use the coupler), along with squiggles, geometric zigzags, and streamers were the quickest designs to execute.  We were also discouraged to use confetti -- I presume it was because of the time increment to pick up a handful and sprinkle it on the cake.

 

We had to make umpteen bags of different colored icing without couplers; instead, each bag had its own tip.  It saved time not having to unscrew/screw on different tips.

 

The production timetable directly influenced payroll.  If the total production wasn't accomplished on a given day (or days) for whatever reason, come the end of the week that percentage would be compared to whatever the payroll that had been earmarked for the following week.  If the week's production wasn't met, hours were cut.

smittyditty Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 3:34am
post #45 of 75

I don't think my walmart has this standard of 32 cakes a day. It would be impossible because they give out free cookies to any kid who asks under 14 so the decorators get interrupted frequently. I feel bad cause I am one of those ppl..but hey I spend at least $100 every time I go and they don't have to put up with a 3 and 1 year old..lol

However that would drive me insane if I was that decorator.
 

embersmom Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 4:40am
post #46 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by smittyditty 

I don't think my walmart has this standard of 32 cakes a day. It would be impossible because they give out free cookies to any kid who asks under 14 so the decorators get interrupted frequently. I feel bad cause I am one of those ppl..but hey I spend at least $100 every time I go and they don't have to put up with a 3 and 1 year old..lol

However that would drive me insane if I was that decorator.
 


Oh yes, the free cookies...

 

And having to stop to bag/package product...or slicing bread...or taking a cake order...or doing price-and-put-out...all while producing X number of cakes within X hours...

Unlimited Posted 18 Jul 2013 , 4:52am
post #47 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by rockymtnbaker 

This is one of the many reasons why we as custom bakers, can offer a superior product to a grocery store;we can actually take the time needed to do the cake THE RIGHT WAY instead of the fast way. 

Just my $.02. icon_wink.gif

My $.02, just because custom bakers are slower, it doesn't mean they offer a superior product.  Anyone who possesses the skills, experience, and speed to do it the fast way, doesn't mean it's not THE RIGHT WAY.  I consider this a sweeping generalization that's not true.  I'm certain others would be offended if I made a statement claiming that fast production decorators are doing it THE RIGHT WAY, and slow custom decorators take so much time to produce a product that they can't possibly know what they're doing to achieve anything worthy of being called superior.  Afterall, most grocery stores have been been doing just fine THEIR WAY before "custom" bakers popped up, so who do you think has the experience?  Experience equals speed - you get faster over time after experiencing high-volume production.  Superior product isn't measured by fast or slow.

rdjr Posted 19 Jul 2013 , 11:51pm
post #48 of 75

Hello everyone, well here is another update. I had my first day of orientation yesterday and it went pretty good. The management staff was really nice and friendly and this is one of the cleanest walmart stores I have seen, it is also in a really nice neighborhood. I have not started working in the actual bakery as I still have computer modules to do. Overall I think everything will turn out great and I am really excited!

Annabakescakes Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 12:04am
post #49 of 75

A

Original message sent by Unlimited

[QUOTE name="rockymtnbaker" url="/t/760820/walmart-decorators/30#post_7417667"] This is one of the many reasons why we as custom bakers, can offer a superior product to a grocery store;we can actually take the time needed to do the cake THE RIGHT WAY instead of the fast way.  Just my $.02. icon_wink.gif

[/QUOTE] My $.02, just because custom bakers are slower, it doesn't mean they offer a superior product.  Anyone who possesses the skills, experience, and speed to do it the fast way, doesn't mean it's not THE RIGHT WAY.  I consider this a sweeping generalization that's not true.  I'm certain others would be offended if I made a statement claiming that fast production decorators are doing it THE RIGHT WAY, and slow custom decorators take so much time to produce a product that they can't possibly know what they're doing to achieve anything worthy of being called superior. [U][B] Afterall, most grocery stores have been been doing just fine THEIR WAY before "custom" bakers popped up, so who do you think has the experience? [/B][/U] Experience equals speed - you get faster over time after experiencing high-volume production.  Superior product isn't measured by fast or slow.

There have always been custom cake bakers, it isn't anything "new" Do you think the Queen of England went to the grocery store to get her wedding cake? Or Clint Eastwood, or Arnold Schwarzenegger? (Just trying to think of older famous people here) Or Cary Grant? Heck, the movie he is in "The Wedding Present" came out in the 1930's, WAY before Ace of Cake's and Cake Boss came out and everyone and their mother saturated the market. I believe that cake in that was some big over piped royal icing tower, unless I am thinking of some other older movie.

Annabakescakes Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 12:05am
post #50 of 75

A

Original message sent by rdjr

Hello everyone, well here is another update. I had my first day of orientation yesterday and it went pretty good. The management staff was really nice and friendly and this is one of the cleanest walmart stores I have seen, it is also in a really nice neighborhood. I have not started working in the actual bakery as I still have computer modules to do. Overall I think everything will turn out great and I am really excited!

Please let us know how many cakes they want out of you, and your "other duties" and what they will allow, and such! This is really nice getting updates on your progress ;-)

kaylawaylalayla Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 3:11am
post #51 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


Please let us know how many cakes they want out of you, and your "other duties" and what they will allow, and such! This is really nice getting updates on your progress icon_wink.gif

yes, inquiring minds want to know :P

smittyditty Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 1:32pm
post #52 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


Please let us know how many cakes they want out of you, and your "other duties" and what they will allow, and such! This is really nice getting updates on your progress icon_wink.gif

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by kaylawaylalayla 

yes, inquiring minds want to know :P


Yes tell us all the dirty secrets..lol...but seriously we really do want to know.

Arreis Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 9:19pm
post #53 of 75

AI've worked as a cake decorator for Walmart before. As for the interview process it is pretty routine, they will ask about your education and experience in cake decorating, also there will be lots of " if this happened what would you do" questions and be prepared to give examples of past experiences of problem solving and dealing with troublesome customers and employees. You can make up a story too they just want to hear that you will keep your calm, get things taken care of efficiently as possible and keep the customer happy. Unfortunately they will probably not let you decorate a cake for the interviews. That only happens once you get the job. Also with Walmart you have to get through 3 interviews then a background check and urine drug test to be hired.

The job- you will be filling custom cake orders as well as decorating cakes for the front case, cakes with and without kits, as well as cupcakes and cupcake cakes. Also you will be responsible for keeping the case full throughout your shift as well as helping customers.

The only part I liked was decorating, everything else was stressful and irritating to say the least. Good luck!

Arreis Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 9:23pm
post #54 of 75

AIf I remember correctly they wanted at LEAST 10 cakes in an hour. Mind you this was back in 2010.

embersmom Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 9:45pm
post #55 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by smittyditty 

 

 


Yes tell us all the dirty secrets..lol...but seriously we really do want to know.


I want to know too -- we can exchange notes icon_wink.gif

embersmom Posted 20 Jul 2013 , 9:47pm
post #56 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arreis 

If I remember correctly they wanted at LEAST 10 cakes in an hour. Mind you this was back in 2010.


That sounds about standard for keeping the case filled :nodding:  As I said upthread, there's more time given for special orders and/or for cakes larger than the standard 8" or 1/4 sheet.

rdjr Posted 21 Jul 2013 , 4:59am
post #57 of 75

I will let ya'll into the "secrets" as much as I can! My first day at the actual bakery is Monday so there should be an update by Monday evening. I am really looking forward to it.

embersmom Posted 21 Jul 2013 , 12:41pm
post #58 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdjr 

I will let ya'll into the "secrets" as much as I can! My first day at the actual bakery is Monday so there should be an update by Monday evening. I am really looking forward to it.


I'm looking forward to it!

 

I'm wondering if a speed icer is going to become your best friend...

cakefat Posted 21 Jul 2013 , 1:42pm
post #59 of 75
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


There have always been custom cake bakers, it isn't anything "new" Do you think the Queen of England went to the grocery store to get her wedding cake? Or Clint Eastwood, or Arnold Schwarzenegger? (Just trying to think of older famous people here) Or Cary Grant? Heck, the movie he is in "The Wedding Present" came out in the 1930's, WAY before Ace of Cake's and Cake Boss came out and everyone and their mother saturated the market. I believe that cake in that was some big over piped royal icing tower, unless I am thinking of some other older movie.

 

Too right!

rdjr Posted 22 Jul 2013 , 11:06pm
post #60 of 75

Okay everyone, here it is! First I got showed around the bakery section, where they place things and such. I got taught how to take orders. And then I started decorating. They just had me do quarter sheet cakes for the case and I could decorate them however I wanted. They did not let me do any ordered cakes though with the kits. My manager does not care how many cakes you ice in the time given as long as you do it as fast as you can. Also, roses are VERY hard to make with the buttercream they use, toooooooo soft. On the otherhand the whipped icing was awsome to work with! I then helped place labels on bakery items like bread, muffins, and donuts. Overall it was a great experience and I am really looking forward to tomorrow! Also, the frosting is too soft for roses but too stiff for actually icing. The first cake I made was not something I was proud of...The frosting was too stiff and it was really hard to smooth. But, my manager showed me a trick which made the other cakes a breeze. One thing that surprized me though was that they did not have any angled spatulas to ice, so I used a plastic scraper instead because I cant ice with the straight spatulas. And, the cake icer is your best friend! it makes things so much easier. Also, costumers like cakes with ballons and sprinkles instead of roses and such. I first I was getting a little discouraged because my cakes were not selling but they did.

 

(sorry for any typos and anything that does not make sense)

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%