cakecalc Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 8:26pm
post #1 of

Since I keep seeing the same question pop up time and time again, I set out to build a baking cost calculator.

 

Here it is: http://bakecalc.com/

 

How can I make this better for you?

 

- Bernard

18 replies
jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 8:40pm
post #2 of

ALooks pretty good, I would recommend using allocated overhead (based on annual overhead cost and estimated order volume) instead of a single overhead value, and adding a markup for profit.

The delivery charge should incorporate the hourly rate as well as mileage reimbursement.

Did you build this with jQuery?

DeliciousDesserts Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 8:40pm
post #3 of

AWow! Really awesome. You even made so the prices are adjustable. Wow!

cakecalc Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 8:59pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 

Looks pretty good, I would recommend using allocated overhead (based on annual overhead cost and estimated order volume) instead of a single overhead value, and adding a markup for profit.

The delivery charge should incorporate the hourly rate as well as mileage reimbursement.

Did you build this with jQuery?

 

excellent suggestions, I did build this entire thing with jQuery (lol) on a single page. Could you clarify on how you see implementing allocated overhead?

 

perhaps asking for annual sales & order volume and doing "annual sales / order volume" to = allocated overhead?

 

I realize it only calculates the cost of baking something at the moment (without factoring a markup for profit). I'm curious as to what other bakers have to say and will make modifications accordingly!

cakecalc Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:01pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

Wow! Really awesome. You even made so the prices are adjustable. Wow!

I tried looking around at all the pricing matrices and just got confused dunce.gif, so I built a calculator that I would like to use! 

sixinarow Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:15pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by cakecalc 

I tried looking around at all the pricing matrices and just got confused dunce.gif, so I built a calculator that I would like to use! 

This is awesome! Thanks for sharing!!

KarenK55 Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:22pm
post #7 of

This is fantastic...thank you so much....  Actually have an order for a cake next weekend and the following can't wait to use your calculator.   

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:26pm
post #8 of

AIMO the easiest way to calculate allocated overhead is first to determine annual overhead by adding up items like insurance, license fees, yearly advertising costs, accounting/tax costs, etc., similar to how you add up ingredients. Then have the user estimate how many products they will be selling each year (with options to estimate by week or month instead). Allocated overhead is the total annual overhead / number of products sold annually.

Profit could be handled with a slider to adjust markup, you'd probably want to default it to 20% and allow a range from 5%-100% or so. A nice-to-have feature would be calculating the resulting profit margin, or even extrapolating how much you (based on your labor cost) and your business (based on profit) will clear after taxes for the year by using the aforementioned estimated order volume.

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:31pm
post #9 of

AFrom a usability perspective, a checkbox list interface might be more intuitive for the ingredient and supply lists. It would also allow a user to remove an item if they clicked on it by mistake.

You may also want to add an option to include commercial kitchen rent: the hourly rental would be under time and any fixed monthly or annual costs would be under overhead. This could be very useful to create "what-if" scenarios to see how much a home baker would have to charge if they use a rented kitchen.

cakecalc Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:44pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by KarenK55 

This is fantastic...thank you so much....  Actually have an order for a cake next weekend and the following can't wait to use your calculator.   

Let me know how it works out for you and how I can improve it to fit your needs.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 

IMO the easiest way to calculate allocated overhead is first to determine annual overhead by adding up items like insurance, license fees, yearly advertising costs, accounting/tax costs, etc., similar to how you add up ingredients. Then have the user estimate how many products they will be selling each year (with options to estimate by week or month instead). Allocated overhead is the total annual overhead / number of products sold annually.

Profit could be handled with a slider to adjust markup, you'd probably want to default it to 20% and allow a range from 5%-100% or so. A nice-to-have feature would be calculating the resulting profit margin, or even extrapolating how much you (based on your labor cost) and your business (based on profit) will clear after taxes for the year by using the aforementioned estimated order volume.

Interesting, I agree with the profits "slider" -- definitely a useful feature to be had (working on this right now). The allocated overhead feels a bit complicated for a one time use calculation (no data is kept anywhere).

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 

From a usability perspective, a checkbox list interface might be more intuitive for the ingredient and supply lists. It would also allow a user to remove an item if they clicked on it by mistake.

You may also want to add an option to include commercial kitchen rent: the hourly rental would be under time and any fixed monthly or annual costs would be under overhead. This could be very useful to create "what-if" scenarios to see how much a home baker would have to charge if they use a rented kitchen.

hmmm, I never considered using checkboxes but I'll play around with the possibility of how they could work.

 

I guess my fear is to overly complicate something that I just see people using in one time bursts...

jennicake Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 9:55pm

looks fantastic!

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 10:06pm

A

Original message sent by cakecalc

The allocated overhead feels a bit complicated for a one time use calculation (no data is kept anywhere).

True, it might be a bit much for a single page. Perhaps in the overhead section you could link to a second page that focuses just on the overhead allocation calculation and passes the result back to the first page. Unless they have done the calculation before, very few people will know what value to use for the overhead box (and some will even say zero).

BTW which development tool did you use to build this? I've been meaning to learn jQuery for a while but I haven't had a chance to invest the time yet.

cakecalc Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 10:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


True, it might be a bit much for a single page. Perhaps in the overhead section you could link to a second page that focuses just on the overhead allocation calculation and passes the result back to the first page. Unless they have done the calculation before, very few people will know what value to use for the overhead box (and some will even say zero).

BTW which development tool did you use to build this? I've been meaning to learn jQuery for a while but I haven't had a chance to invest the time yet.

interesting, yeah I was working on calculating servings but figured that building the calculator would be the core -- then modules could be added on like cake servings, and as you mentioned overhead allocation calcs -- although then I would need to use cookies (at least to save data -- although unreliably)

 

I used a text editor (sublime text) + the javascript console tool in chrome.

JWinslow Posted 10 Jul 2013 , 11:14pm

This is wonderful!  Thank you soooo much!

newbe86 Posted 11 Jul 2013 , 4:14am

I have already downloaded the pricing matrix and after playing with it and adjusting a few things (over-head costs were lower bc I am a home baker) I plugged my numbers into your Baking Cost Calculator and the prices came out with only a 15 cent difference. I can definitely see my self using this, especially for smaller orders. I can price this out within a few minutes of a simple order and still enter it into my pricing matrix so I can keep record and print a receipt with my logo on it. This is awesome. Thank you!  

AusSas Posted 3 Sep 2013 , 10:37am

This is just what I've been looking for!! is there a way to change the measurements from volume to weight as I tend to weigh my flour, sugar etc.  Thanks!

emetz74 Posted 3 Sep 2013 , 11:30am

I love it! I am nowhere near being a business but I always wonder what a business could/should charge for doing what is just fun and practice for me. Nice work! icon_smile.gif

jason_kraft Posted 3 Sep 2013 , 4:24pm

A

Original message sent by AusSas

This is just what I've been looking for!! is there a way to change the measurements from volume to weight as I tend to weigh my flour, sugar etc.  Thanks!

The best way to convert volume to weight is to run some tests to see how much each ingredient weighs: take out the required volume of an ingredient, weigh it, repeat the process several times, and take the average.

bakermhoi Posted 18 Sep 2013 , 5:00am

Quote:

Originally Posted by cakecalc 
 

Since I keep seeing the same question pop up time and time again, I set out to build a baking cost calculator.

 

Here it is: http://bakecalc.com/

 

How can I make this better for you?

 

- Bernard

 

Bernard, this is such a great tool! Thanks for sharing it with us.

 

Anyway, I would love to have a functionality of removing some ingredients, should I make a mistake of clicking one, instead of starting over just to eliminate that one single error. The same comment goes for the supplies.

 

Again many thanks in advance! ^^,

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