Mom_Of_4 Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 2:40pm
post #1 of

Hi there, I have an order for a birthday cake and they are wanting 24 servings. I have always used the wilton cake serving chart but for some reason am second guessing it this morning. An 8 inch round says it is 24 servings, so that is what I would typically make. 

I am just wondering does every one else use the wilton cake serving chart for birthday cakes as well as wedding cakes or is there a better one for birthday cakes? I just can't decide if I should do the 8 inch round cake or go with a 10 in round. Opinions anyone?

32 replies
jason_kraft Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 2:52pm
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AIf an amateur will be cutting the birthday cake I tend to recommend generously-sized servings, so for 24 people I would recommend a 12" round.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 3:58pm
post #3 of

Hmm. I typically go for 15-24 servings out of a 9x13 sheet cake, myself, which works out to about 7-11 cubic inches per serving, and the pattern of the frosting is often a cutting guide in itself (especially with my strawberry marble cake, on which I pipe strawberry shapes in a grid pattern, one per intended serving). With a pound cake baked in a Bundt mold, I typically go for 16 servings, using the ribs of the mold as a cutting guide.

IAmPamCakes Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 4:39pm
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AI would tell them an 8" round will serve 24, and charge accordingly. If they want more cake, they pay for more servings. My price is based on a 1"x2"x4" serving. I can't magically make a bigger slice and have it cost the same as a smaller slice.

Sassyzan Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 4:41pm
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AJust tell them the serving size and give them the option for a bigger cake. But charge accordingly.

klan30 Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 5:05pm
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I use the wilton chart as well, but educate the customer as to what a serving size is.  Like sassyzan said if they want bigger pieces they need to order a larger cake.

leah_s Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 5:27pm
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IAm PamCakes - ditto.  Also ditto Sassyzan.

The industry standard serving size is 1  2 X 4 = 8 cubic inches of cake.  They can order a 12" round and call it TWO servings for all I care, but they PAY for 56 servings.

lorieleann Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 4:29am
post #8 of

i tell customers how many servings I account for in each cake--and how big the slices are.  If they want to have bigger slices, or as I put it give guests a chance for seconds or to have leftovers, then they can order a larger cake.  I also take into account the height of the cake.  many of my non-tiered cakes can go upwards of 5" tall, so that can be taken into consideration for narrower servings. I also give a diagram on how to cut the cake to get those servings. If they decide to cut it like a pie into 8 giant pieces, that's their choice! 

Annabakescakes Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 6:32am
post #9 of

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

If an amateur will be cutting the birthday cake I tend to recommend generously-sized servings, so for 24 people I would recommend a 12" round.

that is 56 servings, you must have a tapeworm, or not be able to fit through doors if you typically eat double portions of everything!

BatterUpCake Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 12:53pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 

If an amateur will be cutting the birthday cake I tend to recommend generously-sized servings, so for 24 people I would recommend a 12" round.

but would you charge for 24 servings?

BatterUpCake Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 12:57pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


that is 56 servings, you must have a tapeworm, or not be able to fit through doors if you typically eat double portions of everything!

lol...except for weddings I have never seen anyone actually serve 1x2x4 slices. Have you seen what they give you at some restaurants?? Jeez...no wonder Americans are so ummmm hefty. I don't complain though!!

matthewkyrankelly Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 2:36pm

For most of my cakes, the same amount of batter makes a two-layer 8inch round or 24 cupcakes.  I would easily charge the 24 servings if it was cupcakes.  Do the same for the cake.

 

If they want more, buy more.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 2:47pm

8 cubic inches is on the low end of the range I get from my sheet cakes, but it's in there.

faithc24 Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 2:57pm

AThese charts have shown up on cake central before but if they help... http://bluesheepbakeshop.myshopify.com/pages/cake-serving-charts

And: http://www.docstoc.com/docs/4862374/Cake-Serving-Chart---DOC

brenda549 Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 3:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by matthewkyrankelly 

For most of my cakes, the same amount of batter makes a two-layer 8inch round or 24 cupcakes.  I would easily charge the 24 servings if it was cupcakes.  Do the same for the cake.

 

If they want more, buy more.

 

^^^    This and this   vvv

 

Because I have sliced my own cakes time after time at various gatherings and parties following Indydeb's cutting guides, I know I get exactly the amount listed in the Wilton wedding servings chart.  And since there are always different types of eaters at every event (kids, dieters, double slices, etc), it always works out.  Therefore, I sell cakes based on 8 cubic inches of cake per serving.  If the client wants more, they pay for more.  

Rachie204 Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 4:05pm

I use this chart for ALL of my cakes  ...   http://www.earlenescakes.com/ckserchart.htm   The measurements on this one give a slightly smaller amount per cake.  For example Wilton says an 8 inch serves 24 and Earlenes chart says an 8 inch round serves 15. 

jason_kraft Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 4:19pm

A

Original message sent by BatterUpCake

but would you charge for 24 servings?

Most people who shop for single tier cakes for casual events are used to seeing a flat price for the cake, not a per-serving price. The charge would be for a 12" cake (based on our cost and a markup for profit), regardless of the number of servings, so recommending generous serving sizes acts as an upsell.

We estimate that a 12" round will serve 22-28 people at a casual event (the cake is usually cut into wedges), and that range has been pretty accurate based on our customer feedback as well as my own experience. Of course it is a different story for formal events where the venue will be cutting standard 1"x2"x4" slices.

jason_kraft Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 4:33pm

A

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

that is 56 servings, you must have a tapeworm, or not be able to fit through doors if you typically eat double portions of everything!

No tapeworm, just a fast metabolism that makes it difficult to gain weight...I've been in the 150-170 lb range since high school. When I do have cake my serving size is probably double Wilton's wedding cake serving size.

costumeczar Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 5:00pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s 

IAm PamCakes - ditto.  Also ditto Sassyzan.

The industry standard serving size is 1  2 X 4 = 8 cubic inches of cake.  They can order a 12" round and call it TWO servings for all I care, but they PAY for 56 servings.

Yes...Just because my teenaged son cuts a whole pizza into quarters it doesn't mean that it's four servings.

bct806 Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 5:30pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

Yes...Just because my teenaged son cuts a whole pizza into quarters it doesn't mean that it's four servings.

LOL! So true

Annabakescakes Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 7:42pm

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

[quote name="Annabakescakes" url="/t/760643/cake-serving-chart#post_7412391"] that is 56 servings, you must have a tapeworm, or not be able to fit through doors if you typically eat double portions of everything!

No tapeworm, just a fast metabolism that makes it difficult to gain weight...I've been in the 150-170 lb range since high school. When I do have cake my serving size is probably double Wilton's wedding cake serving size.[/quote] My husband is going to be 40 next year and he is 5'10" and weighs 145-155, and always has. he eats double portions of regular food but generally restrains himself when it comes to cake. There are others problems that can arise from gorging on sweets, besides a fat a$$, one is cavities and another is diabetes. And I have a fat @$$ and I still only eat a standard wedding portion of cake.

Annabakescakes Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 7:46pm

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

[QUOTE name="leah_s" url="/t/760643/cake-serving-chart#post_7412159"] IAm PamCakes - ditto.  Also ditto Sassyzan. The industry standard serving size is 1  2 X 4 = 8 cubic inches of cake.  They can order a 12" round and call it TWO servings for all I care, but they PAY for 56 servings. [/QUOTE] Yes...Just because my teenaged son cuts a whole pizza into quarters it doesn't mean that it's four servings.

My twin boys are almost 13 and eat a 1/4 while my husband eats the other half, but Dominos tells me a large pizza serves about 8-10 and they still charge me $12 for it.

BatterUpCake Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 7:46pm

AAny food with a high glycemic index can lead to diabetes. But that's a different topic

jason_kraft Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:04pm

A

Original message sent by Annabakescakes

My husband is going to be 40 next year and he is 5'10" and weighs 145-155, and always has. he eats double portions of regular food but generally restrains himself when it comes to cake. There are others problems that can arise from gorging on sweets, besides a fat a$$, one is cavities and another is diabetes. And I have a fat @$$ and I still only eat a standard wedding portion of cake.

:o

Sweets can cause cavities and diabetes? I had never heard that before, do you have a source? If that's true I might have to cut down on my once-a-month cake habit. :wink:

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:32pm

Hmm. The Blue Sheep 9x13 "party cake" guides more-or-less match how I cut sheet cakes, except that I rarely get a full 2" height, even at the highest point (and might be lucky to get more than 1", if I were to level the thing, which is why I treat smooth, gentle doming as perfectly normal, and plan the decorations with that in mind).

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:36pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes View Post
And I have a fat @$$ and I still only eat a standard wedding portion of cake.

 

But how much does the overweight donkey you mention eat?

jadinsaunt Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:40pm

Wilton lists a wedding cake serving chart and a party serving chart don't they? 
 

denetteb Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:44pm

For those just scanning this thread, it seems Jasons 12 inch round suggestion is for a one layer cake, not a two layer 4 inch high cake.  A 12 in round two layer is 56 servings so if you cut it in half with a one layer would be 28 servings using Wilton sizing.

jason_kraft Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:51pm

A

Original message sent by denetteb

For those just scanning this thread, it seems Jasons 12 inch round suggestion is for a one layer cake, not a two layer 4 inch high cake.  A 12 in round two layer is 56 servings so if you cut it in half with a one layer would be 28 servings using Wilton sizing.

My recommended number of servings is for a 12" round two layer cake (4" high total). Customers who cut birthday cakes themselves tend to cut wedges significantly larger than the Wilton sizes.

denetteb Posted 7 Jul 2013 , 8:53pm

Oops, my bad.  In your post #17 above I read single layer instead of tier as you have written.  Thanks for clarifying.

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