BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 1:54pm
post #1 of

Do any of you offer these from your business? If so how well do they sell. Bacon is a huge craze right now so I did a search for bacon roses. I found some that had the bottoms dipped on chocolate and had gumpaste leaves. They were really cute. I was just wondering how they would sell.

24 replies
live laugh cake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 1:58pm
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AI rhink that they would sell well because number one they are super pretty, number two if they don't like them WITH the cake they can remove them! It is worth a try!

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 2:50pm
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Oh I meant selling them alone for anniversaries, birthdays any occasion where you may give a bouquet of roses. I will just have to make a practice bouquet and put them on my site and see if there is any interest. I could do them like the cupcake bouquet

live laugh cake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 3:06pm
post #4 of

AThat is a good idea! I would love it! I thought like as the little flowers that people often put on cakes! Sorry for the confusion!

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 3:31pm
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just google them and look on images...I seen on food network that there is a bacon bar that had bowls of bacon instead of peanuts, most of the drinks contained bacon or infused...bacon bacon bacon everywhere! lol

sixinarow Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 3:52pm
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You could market a "bacon bouquet" during Father's Day..I bet it would go over well. :)

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 4:12pm
post #7 of

I should have thought of that last month!

ericapraga Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 5:25pm
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I offer chocolate dipped strawberries and a couple of cakes and cupcakes with bacon. I also offer chocolate dipped bacon for a couple of restaurants I cater for, but it is not on the website.
 

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 6:05pm
post #9 of

so it sells well?

howsweet Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 7:19pm

I'm pretty sure cottage food laws don't usually allow bakers to sell meats or chocolate dipped strawberries.

sixinarow Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 7:22pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 

I'm pretty sure cottage food laws don't usually allow bakers to sell meats or chocolate dipped strawberries.

Good point.

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 7:28pm

I don't fall under cottage food laws. Never even heard of it before I came on here...

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 7:37pm

Well, I just read that Va does have those food laws but unfortunately Norfolk does not allow it at all. I have to bake in a commercial kitchen

howsweet Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 7:50pm

In Texas, a law was just passed disallowing cities to write laws that interfere with cottage bakers. That part of the law was pretty easy to get through because state legislators did NOT like the idea that city councils would find ways to go around them.  We'd had several who attempted to outlaw cottage food operations within their city limits when it was clear they just disagreed with the state law and they've had to back down. Don't know if this angle is worth looking into.

BatterUpCake Posted 4 Jul 2013 , 9:23pm

It's not a big deal because my daughter owns the restaurant I bake my orders in. I could move 15 minutes away to Virginia Beach apparently though and have no issues. Citizens were fighting it awhile back but it sounded like they were still going to require a second kitchen completely closed off from the rest of the house.

ericapraga Posted 5 Jul 2013 , 12:02am

I have never heard of bakers not being able to do chocolate dipped strawberries or bacon. That would limit some of my cakes! I assume because of the potential for microbial cross contamination between raw meat and baked products, but still, it seem silly.
 

 

And yes, chocolate dipped strawberries and bacon roses do quite well! :)

howsweet Posted 5 Jul 2013 , 12:29am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ericapraga 

I have never heard of bakers not being able to do chocolate dipped strawberries or bacon. That would limit some of my cakes! I assume because of the potential for microbial cross contamination between raw meat and baked products, but still, it seem silly.
 

 

And yes, chocolate dipped strawberries and bacon roses do quite well! :)


I guess it depends on what we're referring to as bakers.  It's pretty typical that only nonhazardous foods are allowed.  I don't know how accurate this is, but here's a link to what cottage food operations are allowed to sell in Pennsylvania http://cottagefoods.org/laws/usa/pennsylvania/

ericapraga Posted 5 Jul 2013 , 5:40pm

It may also depend on how your kitchen is clasiffied, and what you are registered as selling, at least within the city limits of Philadelphia. Outside, is a totally different story.
 

BatterUpCake Posted 5 Jul 2013 , 6:15pm

I'm in Norfolk Va. The kitchen I use is my daughters restaurant that is also licensed to do catering. I will have to check with the city but I can't see how it would be a problem. Then again, it is the gov't. I am making both this weekend (actually starting the strawberries now) just to get an idea of the cost and labor. My friends and co-workers totally make out when I practice! I will post pics later but only if they turn out pretty! lol. And instead of drizzling different colored chocolates over them after dipped I am considering using RI...

BatterUpCake Posted 5 Jul 2013 , 8:48pm

I posted the strawberries. I need more practice I think but  not bad for my first try. I considered taking some from the top and filling with enough buttercream to hold a blueberry in place.

 

Now, I don't want to waste that wine I used in the picture icon_wink.gif

pattycake2013 Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 11:47am

In North Carolina for home base business you would not be able to do it. That stinks. They are so cool.  Put some maple syrup before baking. Or dip top into chocolate.

BatterUpCake Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 12:16pm

I don't bake in my home. My office is located in my home but I am not even allowed to meet clients here. I can bring products here after prepping and packaging to hold for delivery.

 

I had thought of moving to NC after I retire because they do not tax military retirement....but I decided to stay here for baking and pastry school when I get out.

 

I bought some fake roses from the $ store. I am going to roll them, toothpick them, and bake. When they are done I am going to dip the bottom in chocolate and attach to the stem. Then stick them in a planter like cupcake bouquets...

 

The strawberries were delicious! I won't mind practicing those over and over! Toasted coconut was really good. Thinking crushed graham crackers and oreos next time

pattycake2013 Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 1:45pm

In NC you can bake cakes, cookies, breads and cupcakes out of you home no problem. but you have to have your cream cheese frosting tested for mosture content. you can not do cheese cakes or you can't put bacon on your cupcakes. But other wise it is ok. You can not have a catering business (food) out of your house. For a legit business. 

BatterUpCake Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 1:58pm

They don't consider cakes food? lol. I always wonder about the logic behind the govt. So you can do Cream Cheese frosting but not cheesecake? Virginia seems to have CF laws too but my city (probably the only city in VA) does not allow it.

pattycake2013 Posted 6 Jul 2013 , 8:33pm

The only way you can do cream cheese frosting is having a very sweet frosting. Your recipe of 1 stick butter and 8oz cream cheese and 2 cups powered sugar is not going to fly. to much moisture. I thinks it has to only be 85% moisture. Guess they cant trust people to keep everything at the right temp. Like you dont know to keep a cheese cake in the frig after it is done. lol  I do a bacon maple french toast cc but I can not sell it with  the bacon on it. Because bacon is a meat. 

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