Laura2013 Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 2:16am
post #1 of

I got a very weird request from a potential client.

 

"We are looking for someone to decorate a small cheesecake to look like a traditional wedding cake for my fiance and I to cut and eat. We plan on having our caterer cut sheet cakes in the kitchen to serve to our guests, but Cody and I aren't very fond of cake. Is this something you could do for us?"

 

Has anyone ever heard of something like this or had this request in the past? If so, I am super curious to know...

 

Ideas, thoughts, concerns...please let me know!

 

Thanks in advance.

9 replies
SaltCakeCity Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 2:49am
post #2 of

Yes, I've done this before. I made two layers of cheesecake and had a center of buttercream and covered it in MMF. It looked fine and held up fine but the venue later told me that once they cut into it, the cheesecake was just so soft and it didn't hold up as well as the cake did. Now, I just suggest that those that don't really like cake try the cake flavors I have that are based in other desserts (like my Banana Cream Pie cake or Apple Pie Cake). It's cake but it tastes just like the other desserts and that way I'm still staying within what I know best :) I also have a cheesecake filling that I use and tell them to get a flavor with that in the middle. It has the same flavor but holds up better.

bct806 Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 3:19am
post #3 of

Ganache! If you cover it in ganache then it will look like a cake if you decorate it accordingly. White chocolate if they want it to be white. I wouldn't put frosting or fondant on it. 

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 3:32am
post #4 of

They are actually quite easy to stack and decorate, the problem is getting soft. When I do them, they are kept refrigerated up until just before cake cutting, not on display the whole reception.

Alternatively, I also offer Japanese cheesecakes, they hold up much better.

bct806 Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 3:34am
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes 

They are actually quite easy to stack and decorate, the problem is getting soft. When I do them, they are kept refrigerated up until just before cake cutting, not on display the whole reception.

Alternatively, I also offer Japanese cheesecakes, they hold up much better.

How does Japanese cheesecake compare to regular cheesecake? My DH wants me to try making Japanese cheesecake. 

osorio Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 3:43am
post #6 of

ALook this cakes or cheesecakes: www.elegantcheesecakes.com

Laura2013 Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 4:09am
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by bct806 

Ganache! If you cover it in ganache then it will look like a cake if you decorate it accordingly. White chocolate if they want it to be white. I wouldn't put frosting or fondant on it. 

I am beginning to think this is probably one I will just let go. These folks are thinking of getting cake from Costco to serve their guests....when I think about pricing a cheesecake like this...the ingredients for the cheesecake, white chocolate for the ganache, plus my time....I am not sure they would be willing to pay the true cost of it either regardless of how much they say they don't want cake.

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 1 Jul 2013 , 4:48am
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by bct806 

How does Japanese cheesecake compare to regular cheesecake? My DH wants me to try making Japanese cheesecake. 

I have a hard time describing the texture, it's much lighter than American style cheesecake, very soft and melt in your mouth. I read someone calling it 'cotton soft', and that describes it well.

I actually prefer it tastewise though.

bct806 Posted 2 Jul 2013 , 2:29am
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Laura2013 

I am beginning to think this is probably one I will just let go. These folks are thinking of getting cake from Costco to serve their guests....when I think about pricing a cheesecake like this...the ingredients for the cheesecake, white chocolate for the ganache, plus my time....I am not sure they would be willing to pay the true cost of it either regardless of how much they say they don't want cake.

You win some you lose some. If they are even considering Costco for their cake, they aren't willing to spend what it would cost to get something of quality. To each their own I suppose. I may have to try a stacked cheesecake one day. 

bct806 Posted 2 Jul 2013 , 2:29am
Quote:
Originally Posted by scrumdiddlycakes 

I have a hard time describing the texture, it's much lighter than American style cheesecake, very soft and melt in your mouth. I read someone calling it 'cotton soft', and that describes it well.

I actually prefer it tastewise though.

Thanks! I will have to try it. 

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