redonfire Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 7:56pm
post #1 of

I need to make a 1/4 layered sheet cake. I have a 1/2 sheet pan, So would I just make a 1/2 and cut in half and layer that? It seems that its gonna look too small.. Or will it look bigger once it's layered?

 

Thanks!

5 replies
remnant3333 Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 8:36pm
post #2 of

 Is a 9 x 13 x 2 the same as a 1/4 sheet cake? I am sure some of the experts here will be able to tell us.

kakeladi Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 9:44pm
post #3 of

To OP:" What you have suggested is indeed how you would handle this situation.

 

A 9x13 is NOT a 1/4 sheet :(

If you match the cake/pan to the board & box sold as a 1/4 sheet you will find a 12x8 is the proper size for a 1/4 sheet.  And a 12x8 (or 9) is what the OP will get by cutting her 1/2 sheet & stacking the layers.

CWR41 Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 3:58am
post #4 of

Yes, a 9 x 13 is a 1/4 sheet cake...

http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm
 

kakeladi Posted 3 Jul 2013 , 12:20am
post #5 of

CWR - do you believe *everything* Wilton tries to shove at us?  They are NOT the final authority.  That link only shows what size pans Wilton sells - not that they are 1/2 or 1/4. 

Again, if one matches the cake/pan size to the board size sold you will find a 9x13 does NOT fit on a 1/4 board.  (Yes, the *cake* fits, but once it is iced there is NO room for a boarder & the presentation of a cake with NO boarder nor any board room for cutting just doesn't cut it.)

If you divide a full sheet pan - the ones used in professional bakeries youwill find a 12x8 is 1/4th of it. That's where the term comes from.   Bakeries did not have all the different sized & shaped pans now available so they cut down what the baked in their cookie/rolls pan thus the terms of 1/2 and 1/4.

CWR41 Posted 3 Jul 2013 , 2:35am
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by kakeladi 

CWR - do you believe *everything* Wilton tries to shove at us?  They are NOT the final authority.  That link only shows what size pans Wilton sells - not that they are 1/2 or 1/4. 

Again, if one matches the cake/pan size to the board size sold you will find a 9x13 does NOT fit on a 1/4 board.  (Yes, the *cake* fits, but once it is iced there is NO room for a boarder & the presentation of a cake with NO boarder nor any board room for cutting just doesn't cut it.)

If you divide a full sheet pan - the ones used in professional bakeries youwill find a 12x8 is 1/4th of it. That's where the term comes from.   Bakeries did not have all the different sized & shaped pans now available so they cut down what the baked in their cookie/rolls pan thus the terms of 1/2 and 1/4.

I don't believe in reinventing industry standards, and telling pan manufacturers they're making the wrong size.

 

Have you ever considered the box manufacturers aren't making the correct sizes to match the pan sizes?

 

I understand the concept of cutting down full sheet cakes and where the term comes from, but not all bakeries did this... smaller pans were available -- it's nothing new, there were other choices.  Wholesale bakeries baked and shipped correct sizes... it would be a complete crumbly mess if they sold raw edge cakes cut from sheets (not to mention unhappy customers who wouldn't expect this).  If you believe correct sizes can only be from sheet-cut dimensions (baked within a cardboard tray), then a 1/2 would be 12x16 and you contradicted your beliefs when you agreed a 1/2 is 12x18 in this thread:

http://cakecentral.com/t/745341/is-12x18-sheet-pan-considered-1-2-sheet-or-full-sheet-pan

(we've had this discussion before, I'll repeat what I believe once again...)

"The most commonly manufactured 1/4 sheet pan size is 9x13. Everyone and their grandma used this size. It was typically the only size cake pan that anyone owned. (Does anyone own an 8x12?)

These aren't made up sizes, they are real industry standards:
http://www.wilton.com/cakes/making-cakes/baking-wedding-cake-2-inch-pans.cfm"

 

AND, a commercial full sheet Bun pan is 18x26 so 1/4 of it IS 9x13 (not all bakeries bake in 16x24 bakeable cardboard trays).  Bottom line, I don't see the reason for debate... divide YOUR full sheet 18x26 Bun pan and see what you get.

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