Oh No, I Didn't...or...was That Outloud? Or...is There An Unsend Button Somewhere? *sigh*

Business By howsweet Updated 2 Jul 2013 , 1:06am by SystemMod2

costumeczar Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:03pm
post #31 of 87

I would never send anyone an email like that, but if people say that they told me that they found someone cheaper I don't care. The "husband subsidized" thing is s phrase that seems to be floating around here recently, but I vote that it be retired. Considering that most families need more than one income, regardless of whether it's well-paid, minimum wage, or used for a tax writeoff, everyone has the potential to have a spouse-subsidized job if you want to look at it that way. I'm no fan of undercutters, but who knows why they need the money, that isn't for me to judge or write letters to clients about.

 

You do realize that it wasn't the best idea to send it, so just don't do it again, the world will keep spinning and people will keep buying cheap cakes from other people, just let it roll off your back next time.

sugarpixy Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:11pm
post #32 of 87

icon_biggrin.gif
 

newbe86 Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:16pm
post #33 of 87

AYikes... I've said it before and I'll say it again, I'm very new to cake baking/decorating and previously had no idea how much time and effort go into these beautiful cakes. It is an art. This site has taught me so much about pricing, I don't own or run a business so there's a lot I never considered. That being said, if I were your customer, I would have asked "why can so-in-so baker do this same design for half the cost." I don't think anyone should have to justify their prices, but explaining a little to someone who has absolutly no clue of the time and cost could help the problem of them going to someone else who won't give them the same quality. Im very guilty of sending texts and emails out of anger/frustration. Maybe take ten next time before hitting send... But in all reality, if they pay half price, they probably get half quality as well.

howsweet Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:16pm
post #34 of 87

Looks like my responses to everyone ended up at the end of page 2.

Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

I would never send anyone an email like that, but if people say that they told me that they found someone cheaper I don't care. The "husband subsidized" thing is s phrase that seems to be floating around here recently, but I vote that it be retired. Considering that most families need more than one income, regardless of whether it's well-paid, minimum wage, or used for a tax writeoff, everyone has the potential to have a spouse-subsidized job if you want to look at it that way. I'm no fan of undercutters, but who knows why they need the money, that isn't for me to judge or write letters to clients about.

 

You do realize that it wasn't the best idea to send it, so just don't do it again, the world will keep spinning and people will keep buying cheap cakes from other people, just let it roll off your back next time.

I couldn't disagree more about the husband subsidized (or spouse) term. It's a short phrase that sums it up pretty well. If you have a better one, I'd like that even better.  So you're actually saying that undercutting is ok if the person needs the money?  Undercutting is, at best, unkind and in my opinion unconscionable. The end doesn't justify the means. If it did, then I guess we'd be ok with them selling drugs, too, right?

howsweet Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:21pm
post #35 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by newbe86 

Yikes... I've said it before and I'll say it again, I'm very new to cake baking/decorating and previously had no idea how much time and effort go into these beautiful cakes. It is an art. This site has taught me so much about pricing, I don't own or run a business so there's a lot I never considered. That being said, if I were your customer, I would have asked "why can so-in-so baker do this same design for half the cost." I don't think anyone should have to justify their prices, but explaining a little to someone who has absolutly no clue of the time and cost could help the problem of them going to someone else who won't give them the same quality.
Im very guilty of sending texts and emails out of anger/frustration. Maybe take ten next time before hitting send... But in all reality, if they pay half price, they probably get half quality as well.


Haha - i don't know how much of thread you read, but I just had a crazy moment from lack of sleep and sort of snapped. That's not how I do business. I don't think the customer was in error for her assumption that I was drastically overcharging.  The person selling her the cake probably doesn't even understand it

maybenot Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:32pm
post #36 of 87

This may have been said, but certainly another way of protecting yourself a little bit is to refuse to give sketches, pics, or detailed specifications until after a contract has been signed and a non-refundable deposit made.

 

Yes, of course, the client can always go to another baker and try to describe the cake (and if it's a client provided pic, the point may be moot), but non-cakers are notoriously bad at getting the details right.  If all they have to go on is $X/slice, it becomes more difficult to understand if they're actually comparing apples to apples.

costumeczar Posted 29 Jun 2013 , 11:32pm
post #37 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 

Looks like my responses to everyone ended up at the end of page 2.

I couldn't disagree more about the husband subsidized (or spouse) term. It's a short phrase that sums it up pretty well. If you have a better one, I'd like that even better.  So you're actually saying that undercutting is ok if the person needs the money?  Undercutting is, at best, unkind and in my opinion unconscionable. The end doesn't justify the means. If it did, then I guess we'd be ok with them selling drugs, too, right?

Undercutting sucks, and I've written that many times here and on my blog, but there are laws against price fixing. If someone is happy making $4 an hour I would be the first to tell them they need to adjust their pricing, but since there's no laws about how much someone has to charge for anything, people can charge whatever they want. I hardly think that comparing pricing a cake too low is anywhere near the equivalent of selling drugs (unless you heard the research abotu sugar affecting the addiction centers of the brain the same way that drugs do.) Most people who are pricing too low probably aren't even aware that they're not making decent money.. The "husband subsidized" phrase is just a little too cute for me.

shanter Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 12:59am
post #38 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

<<snip>>

everyone has the potential to have a spouse-subsidized job.

I'm not sure what you meant by that statement. I don't have the potential to have a spouse-subsidized job.

karensjustdessert Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:09am
post #39 of 87


 

Just to be clear, you think my email was a "A long, angry speech of criticism or accusation"?

 

No, I would go more with the second definition:

a long, vehement speech.

 

:)

PumpkinTart Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:13am
post #40 of 87

I'm with costumeczar on the "husband subsidized" phrase.  I find it demeaning  and ***ist.  "Spouse subsidized" is only slightly better.

 

To me, if you are making cakes as a hobby and your spouse's income allows you to do so, that's great for you and enjoy your hobby.  If you are making cakes as a business, you should have a profit motive.  If a spouse's income pays the household bills while you grow your business, that's a sign of a great relationship--not a man taking care of his wife but a partner supporting a partner.  Again, note the ***ist undertone that the man is the breadwinner, which has RARELY been the case in my home.

 

I don't keep score.  What's mine is his and what's his is mine.  The higher earner isn't subsidizing the other.  We're supporting each other with our combined incomes.

kikiandkyle Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:40am
post #41 of 87

ATo me husband subsidized cake business means you are selling cake at such a low price that you're not making a cent, and in some cases the baker's household income is actually paying for part of it, or at least at the most extreme end of things. Living off other income until you have enough volume to make a living from your cakes is one thing, working on cakes for 60-80 hours a week and still not making any money is a different story.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:42am
post #42 of 87

A

Original message sent by shanter

I'm not sure what you meant by that statement. I don't have the potential to have a spouse-subsidized job.

Or a partner subsidized job, or whatever, if you're living with someone and relying on each other's income. One earns more, one earns less, so one "subsidizes" the other if both are needed to run the household. My point is just that saying that one person earning less means that they're being subsidized is demeaning, to use PumpkinTart's term. If you're single that's an entirely different issue and comes with its own set of income issues.

I think that people are also confusing the terms "undercutting" and "undercharging." If you're not charging enough we all refer to undercutters, but the more people who get into the cake business, as the result of taking one wilton class or the cottage food laws or for whatever reason, the more people who are just undercharging. I think of someone who's undercutting as someone who has done research and who knows what the average selling prices are, but who chooses to charge substantially less. Or someone who takes the price that you've quoted someone and says that they'll charge less just to get the job. Whereas someone who's undercharging is just ignorant of the true costs that it takes to make the cake and doesn't charge enough. Undercutting is deliberate and undercharging is accidental. Both result in damage to the marketplace because it makes people expect a lower price overall, but undercharging isn't malicious.

I just think that writing a letter to a client basically accomplishes nothing other than probably pissing the client off. You'd be better served to write to the person who's charging way less and telling them that they should raise their prices because they're ripping themselves off. The number of "what should I charge for this cake" threads on here tells me that there are a lot of people who are operating out of total ignorance about how to price their cakes, and they're probably underchargers, not undercutters, know what I mean? I doesn't mean that undercharging is good, but expecting everyone to charge what we would consider a fair price is never going to happen.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:45am
post #43 of 87

A

Original message sent by kikiandkyle

To me husband subsidized cake business means you are selling cake at such a low price that you're not making a cent, and in some cases the baker's household income is actually paying for part of it, or at least at the most extreme end of things. Living off other income until you have enough volume to make a living from your cakes is one thing, working on cakes for 60-80 hours a week and still not making any money is a different story.

That's not a business, that's a hobby. You could look at that as a business run at a loss as a tax deduction, too. I worked at a job once that was set up that way, it was pathetic.

shanter Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 2:29am
post #44 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

<<snip>>If you're single that's an entirely different issue and comes with its own set of income issues. <<snip>>

 

Yes.

gatorcake Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 3:44am
post #45 of 87

The problem with the approach of the O.P. is that it was reactive rather than proactive and as such played a role in the client opting for a lower priced option.  Folks need to accept the fact that undercutting is part of a competitive marketplace--low cost alternatives exist in almost every, if not all, industries.  Cottage laws which create the possibility of lower overhead and lower barriers to entry, among other factors, means the specialty cake market will have its share of low cost alternatives and thus undercutting will happen.  Note costumerczar is right--undercharging and undercuttering are not the same thing--the effect of undercharging will mean your prices are undercut, but undercutting as a competitive strategy stems from knowledge of competitor's prices.

 

Returning to the point--given this situation it is incumbent on businesses that cannot afford to slash their prices to nonetheless develop strategies that account for low-cost alternatives.  Undercutting is going to happen--the specialty cake market is not immune to competitive forces and taking the moral high ground (especially if your business has benefited from low-cost alternatives like buying supplies from an internet store that has no corresponding brick and mortar shop) is simply wishing for something that is not going to happen -- being immune to low-cost alternatives.

 

At least part of the problem in this situation is that the client was not made to feel like they were getting enough value (quality relative price).  The OP highlights this fact by stating that she felt motivated to "educate" the client as she felt the client might have thought she was being price gouged.  And indeed explanation of the client's response seems to confirm this.  

 

The problem is the O.P. should have educated the client before-hand.  This is a common recommendation for how to compete against low-cost alternatives.  Given what is described here, the client did not have a sense of the quality provided by the O.P. and frankly the email does not provide much either resting the justification for prices on the fact that she is trying to make a living from her business.  

 

Given all of the discussion of common assumptions held by the general public (it's just flour and water) and the impact of cake shows, it is poor business practice to assume that potential clients are knowledgeable about the industry generally and what sets you apart from other non-low cost specialty bakers.  If you are not educating the client as a way of building value (and along with it trust) you are facilitating conditions where customers will make decisions solely on price.  

 

Finally, the O.P. should have discussed her brand and not engaged in a sweeping generalized smear campaign (this is why there was little educational value to the email and why it thus unprofessional).  Now maybe this was done at the initial meeting, if so, it was not effective as the O.P. states she felt the client assumed she was being gouged.  But the "information" provided is not based on the particularities of the unknown competitors and seems to be predicated on the idea that the only legitimate business is one where which enables the owner to make a living.  Not much educational value here.  Rather than besmirching the competition with generalizations and assumptions that may not account for the low-cost competitor, the O.P. should have been focused on developing trust with the client by emphasizing what sets her apart and how she generates provides value to her clients.

 

Would this have made a difference?  In this case it seems not as it seems the client's financial situation influenced her decision.  Then again she make have been more willing to make other sacrifices.  Point is it is poor business practice to act as if the specialty cake business should be immune to the pressures of low-cost alternatives.    And if you only become interested in educating clients after they have opted for low-cost alternatives, you will continue to lose clients to low-cost alternatives.

jason_kraft Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 5:15am
post #46 of 87

A

Original message sent by gatorcake

The problem is the O.P. should have educated the client before-hand.  This is a common recommendation for how to compete against low-cost alternatives.  Given what is described here, the client did not have a sense of the quality provided by the O.P. and frankly the email does not provide much either resting the justification for prices on the fact that she is trying to make a living from her business.

This.

jason_kraft Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 5:23am
post #47 of 87

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

That's not a business, that's a hobby. You could look at that as a business run at a loss as a tax deduction, too. I worked at a job once that was set up that way, it was pathetic.

I'm working on a blog post that explains how financially disadvantageous it is to run a hobby at a loss vs. running a business at a loss. The rules for taking deductions are much stricter for hobbies.

I have no problem with someone having their cake decorating subsidized by someone else (it doesn't matter who, I think just saying it's subsidized is enough). I don't even have a problem with this subsidized cake decorator launching a business, as long as they price based on market value and their cost structure without the subsidy. What I have a problem with is when the subsidy becomes a crutch and serves as a substitute for acquiring and exercising the basic business skills necessary to serve the public in a capitalist society.

If you don't want to learn the business side, that's fine too. Just keep cake decorating as a hobby and don't run a business, formally charge for your work, or advertise.

lorieleann Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 5:38am
post #48 of 87

I like the black teeshirts at Macy's. But Target has black tee shirts that are half as expensive.  Are they as good of quality?  Most likely not.  But I need a black tee shirt to wear to this birthday party and I'd rather spend less on it. After all, they are both black tee shirts and no one is really going to know the difference, right? I can go tell Macy's this, but Macy's probably knows that Target also sells black tee shirts so what's the point?  I'd be really surprised and very turned off if Macy's felt the need to 'educate' me about their quality and that their vendors need to make a living.  Yes, I know that a Macy's tee shirt is great and I would probably buy one for a more special occasion. Heck, I'll probably buy a nice cocktail dress, shoes and a new red lipstick from Macy's for my next special occasion--but not if Macy's criticized my decision to buy a tee shirt at Target. But Macy's isn't going to do that. Maybe the little boutique out of Pretty Woman would poke jabs at my Target shirt, but i'm not their customer anyway.

 

my (round-about) point is: brand your business so that you aren't seen as competition with low-price bakers.  If you are primarily attracting price-shoppers but are loosing out on that business because your price is too high, then you need to attract shoppers who are looking for more than a great deal.  

DeliciousDesserts Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 12:02pm
post #49 of 87

ATHAT is the problem!! Most people recognize the difference between the quality of those 2 shirts. Sadly, most people don't know or understand the difference when it comes to cake.

I understand there are people who can't afford a custom cake. What bothers me is that people really do think cake decorators are just making a bundle. Sadly, there isn't much we can do to change it.

I wish there was a way to educate without seeming pretentious. I haven't yet found one. For now, I have to be grateful that my clients do recognize &/or value my cakes. I will forever battle the cost issue. Just lost one last night.

Really wish more shows would show the price. Love that "amazing cakes" on TlC does.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:02pm
post #50 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by lorieleann 

 

my (round-about) point is: brand your business so that you aren't seen as competition with low-price bakers.  If you are primarily attracting price-shoppers but are loosing out on that business because your price is too high, then you need to attract shoppers who are looking for more than a great deal.  

Exactly, and if someone is just looking for a great deal then let them go get it somewhere else because if the quality isn't as important to them as it is to you then you can't change that. If you have an opportunity to tell them why your cakes are better and worth your pricing then do it, but after the fact comes off as sour grapes.

 

Jason, I've been writing about cake business for years on my blog and I wrote a book about starting a home-based business and what goes into it in terms of the mistakes that people tend to make when going from a hobby to a business. Most people aren't considering the financial aspect of it when they decide to start selling cakes, they're thinking "oh boy, I can be my own boss, get out from behind a desk, and have fun!"  I had one woman write to me and thank me for the book, since she read it and decided that running a business wasn't for her. What my issue is with threads like this is that people seem to think that there's a magic way to make everyone charge what the average market price is, and you can't do that, other than with price-fixing, which is illegal.

 

 If someone wanted to run a business with the goal of making minimum wage or less, and they accomplish that, then they have a right to do that. I think it's stupid and not a great business plan, but if that's what they want to do then you can't stop them. Doing custom cakes as a business has a low bar to entry in an area where there are cottage food laws, so anyone who can get a cake pan can do it (I guess that's the bar to entry.) Of course the people who plan on earning a decent wage for themselves will be irritated by it when customers go somewhere cheaper, but it happens in every industry, and it will continue to happen. All you can do is plan a sales pitch that gives people reasons to consider why your product is worth paying more.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:09pm
post #51 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 


I wish there was a way to educate without seeming pretentious. I haven't yet found one. For now, I have to be grateful that my clients do recognize &/or value my cakes. I will forever battle the cost issue. Just lost one last night.

Really wish more shows would show the price. Love that "amazing cakes" on TlC does.

I like that show because of that, too...I have people come in with pictures from wedding magazines with the prices ripped off, like I'll think that it's $2 a serving if it doesn't have it on the picture they give me. I've lost a few cakes recently to pricing, but that's been happening more since the cottage food law started here a couple of years ago. On the other hand, I just heard that one of the venues that I work with has started requiring a business license and inspection certificate from bakers because of the cottage food law and the disasters they've had to deal with as a result, hahaha!

 

the only way to show that you're better value is to have the reasons on your website and in your sales pitch when you're meeting with the clients. I always tell them that I bake from scratch, don't use anything artificial, don't freeze anything, do a limited number of cakes per week, I'm the only one who works on and delivers the cake, I'm licensed and inspected, etc etc etc. The people who appreciate good quality food will respond to that, and the people who are just looking for the cheapest price won't, but they wouldn't have hired me anyway.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:36pm
post #52 of 87

Oy...I got off this thread and went to check my email, and there was a response from someone who had asked about a 3-D sports car cake. I had asked her what her budget was, and she wrote back with a very nice email about why she wanted to get this for her husband, blah blah, nice story. Then she said something like she didn't want to insult me and she didn't know how much those cakes cost, but she's on a tight budget and was looking for something  for 10 people for $40.

 

Then she added something along the lines of "please don't make fun of me or scoff at my budget if I'm wrong about that price, I don't know how much they cost but I want to get him something nice." So I wrote her back and told her that I couldn't help her because those cakes take a long time to make and they start at $250, but that if her budget changes to let me know. I'm really, really hoping that she made a mistake and meant to type $400, not $40, but it makes me wonder if she's been laughed at before, which would be totally unnecessary. People really have NO IDEA, and they're flying blind with the $18 sheet cake from Costco for 30 people as the benchmark price in their minds.

Godot Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 1:59pm
post #53 of 87

But it's great that she admitted her ignorance about the cake costs. A perfect chance to educate a (future) client about why custom cakes are costly.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 2:14pm
post #54 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by Godot 

But it's great that she admitted her ignorance about the cake costs. A perfect chance to educate a (future) client about why custom cakes are costly.

True...Now she knows that they take up to ten hours to do a detailed 3-d cake like that, but that's all I said.

soldiernurse Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 2:22pm
post #55 of 87

A

Original message sent by Lili5768

She had some nerve to tell you she found someone else to do it cheaper!

In this case your response was justified and appropriate.

My motto is rise above it and always keep the door open ;)  Because if the other cake is a disappointment she will return to you and pay whatever you ask!  and you never know.

So I would have written her this:

I'm very sorry that I could not be of help to you at this time. I loved the design and was looking forward to making it. But I'm happy you have found someone that can.

I do feel though that my price was based on the quality of the work that I do, quality ingredients, and the time and work involved in executing the design.

I wish you a joyous occasion and I remain at your service for any future celebration.

Thank you and have a blessed day.

A saving grace!! Very nicely put!

jason_kraft Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 3:27pm
post #56 of 87

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

What my issue is with threads like this is that people seem to think that there's a magic way to make everyone charge what the average market price is, and you can't do that, other than with price-fixing, which is illegal.

Price fixing is when you meet directly with your competitors and all agree to charge the same fixed price. That's very different from attempting to educate competitors on how to price in the first place (which is of course not guaranteed or even easy).

If someone wanted to run a business with the goal of making minimum wage or less, and they accomplish that, then they have a right to do that. I think it's stupid and not a great business plan, but if that's what they want to do then you can't stop them.

Agreed, the hope is they are undercharging and undercutting. The most damaging situation is someone with a high level of baking and decorating skills and a lack of business skill combined with a subsidy that allows their cake charity to continue indefinitely.

costumeczar Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 4:11pm
post #57 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


Price fixing is when you meet directly with your competitors and all agree to charge the same fixed price. That's very different from attempting to educate competitors on how to price in the first place (which is of course not guaranteed or even easy).
 

I can't think of one example where trying to "educate" your competition about how to price things would be useful. Most of the comments on these types of threads are just saying things like "they're undercutting me and they need to charge more" which would mean that they need to charge what the person complaining is charging. But then if they did raise their prices so that everyone was in lockstep they'd have to learn to market themsleves appropriately, which is what they should just do in the first place. I have to go see World War Z now, so I can't keep beating this dead horse (unless it's a zombie). 

MimiFix Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 4:15pm
post #58 of 87
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


The most damaging situation is someone with a high level of baking and decorating skills and a lack of business skill combined with a subsidy that allows their cake charity to continue indefinitely.

Unfortunately, I know about a similar situation, but somewhat more damaging because the person understood business but had non-business motives. I did some consulting for a caker who'd been in business for a year. She was independently wealthy, an artist with incredible skills, and charged way under market expecting to build up her name recognition. She had more business than she could handle, hired two people to help with production, and operated at a loss. She was only interested in growing her (hobby) "business" for emotional reasons and did not care that the three established cakers in her community suffered from her presence. I addressed this issue but nothing that I said made any difference. She had only hired me to help write a business plan for her latest venture: a bakery cafe.

jason_kraft Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 4:19pm
post #59 of 87

A

Original message sent by costumeczar

I can't think of one example where trying to "educate" your competition about how to price things would be useful.

I brought this up in my blog article on pricing and economic damage. IMO the best way to approach this is indirectly by working with a third party to engage the businesses serving your market with a free course (covering pricing and marketing in general) on how to make more money selling cakes.

Businesses do not have to price in lockstep, but they do need to price appropriately to their market (which includes earning a decent wage and margin), otherwise the long-term prospects of viable businesses serving said market are grim.

carmijok Posted 30 Jun 2013 , 4:52pm
post #60 of 87

If I felt compelled to write anything to educate the customer I probably would have said something like:

 

"I fully understand your budget situation.  It is my hope that you get the cake you want at this much lower price.  However,  I worry that customers often think price is the only difference between cakes when there is so much more.   Since there is such a large disparity in our prices,  here are some points I do hope you consider for your peace of mind and confidence in your purchase. 

 

1.  I encourage you to research your baker thoroughly and that you feel confident in their skill level.  Make sure they have consistent  photos of their work and that they have produced cakes with similar quality of design.  So often I've seen instances where the reality did not meet the expectations of the cake purchaser.   No amount of money saved is worth the disappointment in getting a bad 'bargain'. 

 

2.  If you have not tasted the person's cake,  order some cupcakes in the flavor and icings that you are wanting and get a taste of their quality.  Often bargain bakers rely on cheap ingredients and shortcuts to lessen the cost of their product.  Doing this step will assure that you are getting the taste and quality you want for you and your guests.

 

3.  Make certain that there will be no 'hidden' costs that show up later...such as the cost of  fondant or gum paste applications, or a filling that was 'extra' or  the cost of internal structure (dowels, SPS system, etc.).  Make certain your quote is all-inclusive.

 

If you are satisfied with all the above, then congratulations on finding a true bargain!  The costs of quality ingredients, the overhead, and most importantly, the time spent producing a highly skilled design all play into pricing a quality cake.  Take advantage of it now because chances are, this baker will eventually have to raise their prices in order to maintain their business if they wish to keep operating with the same high standards. 

 

Best of luck in your purchase and know that if any of the above scenarios do not meet your requirements,  I will be happy to provide a quality product that meets and hopefully exceeds your expectations.

 

Thank  you for your consideration!"
 

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