cakealicious7 Posted 26 Jun 2013 , 7:22pm
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AHi everybody : ) so I was thinking that I would like to start working with modelling chocolate, I have no experience with it whatsoever and was wondering if anybody had any tips? The recipe is just your basic good quality chocolate and liquid glucose,do any of you guys add anything extra? I would also like to know if there is anything I should be steering clear of. Thanks xx

9 replies
LizzieAylett Posted 26 Jun 2013 , 8:15pm
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Make sure you don't add anything that isn't oil-based to it until after you have added the liquid glucose, otherwise the chocolate will seize and the batch will be useless.
 

WickedGoodies Posted 27 Jun 2013 , 5:29pm
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Hi there. Here is my recipe and instructions for how to use modelling chocolate ► http://www.wickedgoodies.net/2013/01/how-to-make-modeling-chocolate/

Lots of tips for you there. I hope that helps! 

 

Modeling a figurine out of modeling chocolate and piped chocolate. These photos are from my new book, Cake Decorating with Modeling Chocolate  http://www.wickedgoodies.net/cake-decorating-with-modeling-chocolate/

 

80's themed birthday cake finished in buttercream and modeling chocolate. Instructions for how to make the modeling chocolate decorations >> http://www.wickedgoodies.net/cake-decorating-with-modeling-chocolate/

jiya11 Posted 27 Jun 2013 , 7:37pm
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OMG, What an abundance of knowledge on your website. I am in love!! Thank You!

I got Ghiradelli and Target Brand white chips. Will update how it turns out.

 

One question: How does hot weather effect modelling chocolate? Will it melt/deform or the colors bleed into the cake?

WickedGoodies Posted 27 Jun 2013 , 7:46pm
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Hot weather is most challenging when working with modelling chocolate. I shut the windows, crank the air conditioning, and make a practice of pausing between all the stages of handling so that the modelling chocolate always has time to firm up. It's much easier to work with it in a cool dry room. Another tip is to wait to put decorations on the cake (like bows or flowers) until the last minute, so that the modelling chocolate is not sitting in the fridge, which can be a moist environment. If you keep modelling chocolate-wrapped cakes sealed in plastic wrap, you can avoid issues of sweating/bleeding. 

jiya11 Posted 27 Jun 2013 , 7:52pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by WickedGoodies 

Hot weather is most challenging when working with modelling chocolate. I shut the windows, crank the air conditioning, and make a practice of pausing between all the stages of handling so that the modelling chocolate always has time to firm up. It's much easier to work with it in a cool dry room. Another tip is to wait to put decorations on the cake (like bows or flowers) until the last minute, so that the modelling chocolate is not sitting in the fridge, which can be a moist environment. If you keep modelling chocolate-wrapped cakes sealed in plastic wrap, you can avoid issues of sweating/bleeding. 

So for an outdoor party in Sunny Florida, its best to avoid it I guess..

Thanks! I am planning on making hulk's hands as a part of a cake for my sons birthday two weeks away. I was recommended on using Candy Clay.If I make it ahead of time, I should just store in an airtight container in a cool dry place?

WickedGoodies Posted 27 Jun 2013 , 9:06pm
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You don't have to avoid it just because you live in Florida. It would be perfect for sculpting a hulk head! Just make sure you don't put the cake directly in the sun as it will get soft and droopy just the same as buttercream would. On a hot day, display the cake ideally indoors or at the very least, in the shade. Yes, you can store modelling chocolate for months if you keep it well-sealed in a cool dry, place.

jiya11 Posted 27 Jun 2013 , 9:33pm
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A

Original message sent by WickedGoodies

You don't have to avoid it just because you live in Florida. It would be perfect for sculpting a hulk head! Just make sure you don't put the cake directly in the sun as it will get soft and droopy just the same as buttercream would. On a hot day, display the cake ideally indoors or at the very least, in the shade. Yes, you can store modelling chocolate for months if you keep it well-sealed in a cool dry, place.

Awesome! Thanks for the valuable advise..

smittyditty Posted 28 Jun 2013 , 12:16am
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Marking! Thanks for the cool website!
 

cakealicious7 Posted 28 Jun 2013 , 12:15pm

AThankyou for the reply WickedGoodies

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