Tails Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 8:16am
post #1 of

Who uses the bottles like these for decorating cookies? What are your thoughts vs using a piping bag? I always get so frustrated with piping bags as they end up messing everywhere (even using the clingwrap sausage thing method) but I dont want to buy a set of these if people dont think they're useful (money is tight and these are expensive here in SA so I need to buy wisely). Help! :) (also, if you used to use them, why'd you change?)

 

17 replies
Shrey Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 8:56am
post #2 of

Hi Tails,

 

Bottles, definitely!

I recently bought 2 Bottles from My Dollar Store and I have to say I LOVE them. I'm thinking of investing in some smaller ones now and the ones with the tips. So much easier and less messy for doing cookies.

 

-Easier to fill and re-fill.

-They are just so much cleaner than the bags

Tails Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 9:30am
post #3 of

Awesome! Thanks for your feedback.

 

Do you think they will work with the tips I already own from piping bags perhaps?

 

Anyone else have any thoughts?

kearniesue Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 12:32pm
post #4 of

I use them for chocolate because it's easy to just pop them in the microwave, but I haven't used them for royal.  I don't see why they wouldn't work well though.  I think it's easier to control the flow with them.

 

Karen

aem1029 Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 1:54pm
post #5 of

I use these but only to fill smaller areas because they have a smaller tip than the larger bottles.  I still use piping bags to outline my cookies.  I use the saran wrap "sausage" method too with no problems and it helps save the bags for later use.  Are you wanting them to outline or fill?  Maybe your consistency in the bags is too wet and that's what is causing the mess??  And yes, they come with those tips but the normal size tips that I already had fit as well.

ECC12 Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 2:09pm
post #6 of

I like to use the piping bags for outlining and detail work, since the Royal Icing is thicker.

The bottles I use for flooding only.  I have the larger bottles that can hold more icing which is great. 

malou1021 Posted 19 Jun 2013 , 4:22pm
post #7 of

AI use the larger ones for flooding. Some of the cookies blogs that I keep up with use those bottles even for detailed work.

Custom Cookies Posted 20 Jun 2013 , 12:49am
post #8 of

I switched to bottles a couple of years ago and find them much easier.  I find I have more control and details are easier.  It feels almost like using a giant crayon or pencil.  I use the larger ones for flooding and the smaller Wilton ones for piping. 

 

The ones I use are not the really small ones in the photo in the earlier post; mine are a bit larger and I believe they are made for chocolate; they come in a set of 18 or so.  They can be used with regular tips, although the threads are slightly off so they don't fit perfectly.  Filling the larger ones for flooding is easy -- you just pour the icing in --but I have to say, getting the stiffer piping icing into the smaller bottles is a pain.  I bought a big syringe-type thing at my cake supply store, and it works pretty well.  It has a barrel that holds roughly the amount that the bottles do, and you can just put a large tip on the end and easily fill the bottles.  (I have tried filling pastry bags using the plastic wrap method, and then "piping" the icing into the bottles, but I think the syringe is easier and neater.)

 

Good luck!
 

Tails Posted 20 Jun 2013 , 12:35pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by aem1029 

I use these but only to fill smaller areas because they have a smaller tip than the larger bottles.  I still use piping bags to outline my cookies.  I use the saran wrap "sausage" method too with no problems and it helps save the bags for later use.  Are you wanting them to outline or fill?  Maybe your consistency in the bags is too wet and that's what is causing the mess??  And yes, they come with those tips but the normal size tips that I already had fit as well.

 

No I generally use 12-15sec icing for everything, but I think our bags here are just sub par and they're small (the large ones are super expensive) so I can only do little bits at a time lol which just makes things a pain.

 

I might see if I can buy one bottle and give it a try cos the reviews sound decent enough to give it a go :) Thanks!

sewsugarqueen Posted 22 Jun 2013 , 2:53pm

I use bottles for flooding and large areas and pastry bags where I can change tips for linework and detail.  The bottles just weren't the right size for my details except for dots...will use bottle for dots as it gives even dot size

Montrealconfections Posted 25 Jun 2013 , 6:11pm

To start off why not visit your local dollar store and get some squeeze bottles there you'll know if this is an option for you. I started off using squeeze bottles but stopped, the cleanup was killing me and I could never use up all the icing like I can in a pipping bag.

shiney Posted 12 Mar 2014 , 7:27pm

I use bottles (the small ones that fit coupler and tips) exclusively, but have been watching some tutorials and notice these amazing cookiers use piping bags.  I use the bottle like an oversized pen, and wasn't sure if I could do the same with the bags.  Any thoughts?

SweetShop5 Posted 13 Mar 2014 , 2:48am

Its really up to you, I like to use the bottle because I feel like I have more control, but its harder to get the royal icing out. Piping bags are easier. It depends what you like but they're both good.

Pastrybaglady Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 7:24am

I have the pictured bottles and love using them for detail work and use the ketchup size for flooding.  I like that you can use piping tips you already have.  The main benefit of piping bags is that they are so easy to squeeze, but the bottles are neater and to me easier to control.

shiney Posted 15 Mar 2014 , 6:35pm

Ok, so I tried bags today.  decided to stick to bottles.  I'm sure it's all in what you're used to.  Found it a pain to fill the bags, and keep them closed.  I know there are closer thingies, but glad I didn't invest in them.  Too much cutting tips off bags, needing a third hand or cup for filling bags, keeping up with them upside down in cup while decorating with several colors,etc.   I think it's harder on hands to squeeze the bottles, though.  But I can also keep icing in bottles with lid for next decorating session.

Custom Cookies Posted 17 Mar 2014 , 1:33am

Quote:

Originally Posted by shiney 
 

Ok, so I tried bags today.  decided to stick to bottles.  I'm sure it's all in what you're used to.  Found it a pain to fill the bags, and keep them closed.  I know there are closer thingies, but glad I didn't invest in them.  Too much cutting tips off bags, needing a third hand or cup for filling bags, keeping up with them upside down in cup while decorating with several colors,etc.   I think it's harder on hands to squeeze the bottles, though.  But I can also keep icing in bottles with lid for next decorating session.


Like you, I feel I have more control with the bottles.  To me, they are great for flooding (larger bottles), and for lines and dots (smaller bottles with various tips.)  For anything more complicated, like drop flowers, it seems like the bags are better because you can control the pressure. ( I have occasionally used the bottles with a leaf tip and a star tip, and it was ok.)

 

The trick with the bottles is to get the consistency just right.  Also, a couple of suggestions: 

If you store your icing in the bottle, you might find that it separates overnight.  If that happens, you can use the fat end of a chopstick to stir it well.

While using the bottles, keep them upside down (I use a plastic container with a damp sponge in the bottom; it can hold several bottles at once.)  Keeping them upside down will reduce air bubbles -- not eliminate them, unfortunately.

 

Good luck!

shiney Posted 17 Mar 2014 , 3:29am

ACustom Cookies it sounds like we do the same. Upside down in short glass with damp paper towel. I use the end of a spoon to stir if they separate. I have invested in several bottles and tips. Guess I won't fix what ain't broke ;). I'm a huge RBC user so I don't do a lot of flooding. But I try to use the large bottles for that. And yes if I use very thick RI I will try to use a bag. I will pass on one new trick I discovered. A nylon (piece of knee-high hose) between coupler and tip to keep 0 and 00 from clogging. I saw something about straining RI through one and decided to shortcut that step. Works like a dream! Saves a ton of frustration

Custom Cookies Posted 17 Mar 2014 , 3:35am

Quote:

Originally Posted by shiney 

Custom Cookies it sounds like we do the same. Upside down in short glass with damp paper towel. I use the end of a spoon to stir if they separate. I have invested in several bottles and tips. Guess I won't fix what ain't broke icon_wink.gif. I'm a huge RBC user so I don't do a lot of flooding. But I try to use the large bottles for that. And yes if I use very thick RI I will try to use a bag. I will pass on one new trick I discovered. A nylon (piece of knee-high hose) between coupler and tip to keep 0 and 00 from clogging. I saw something about straining RI through one and decided to shortcut that step. Works like a dream! Saves a ton of frustration


I've heard the nylon trick but have never tried it.  I wonder if it would cut down on air bubbles too......I'll have to give it a try.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%