Elcee Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 6:45pm
post #1 of

Ugh, and it's supposed to be in the 90s! I have a delivery refusal disclaimer I plan to have her sign. I was thinking of making up a fun flier of sorts with instructions on how to deliver a tiered buttercream cake. Silly pictures, very attention getting.

 

It's a small cake, just 2 tiers, but a rough delivery under the best circumstances. It's almost 60 miles on curvy, hilly roads in desert-like conditions that will take over an hour. (my charge to deliver would have been approximately $150, which is why the planner is picking it up) 

 

My plan for the delivery was to center dowel, start out well-chilled, wrap the box in plastic and pack a couple of bags of ice around the box to help keep it cold. I will supply shelf-liner for her car but since they are refusing to pay for delivery, I shouldn't have to supply the ice, should I? I'm leaning towards considering that part of the service they are giving up by not paying for delivery.

 

I'd love to hear your thoughts on this.

 

Thanks!

47 replies
DeliciousDesserts Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 6:58pm
post #2 of

AAbsolutely sign waiver.

Absolutely do Not provide ice. She's lucky your providing non skid.

KatieKake Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:00pm
post #3 of

I have mixed emotions about this, yes, they have said by not having you deliver the cake that you are not  responsible for any thing once the cake is picked up buy the wedding planner.  On the other hand, I would hate to see the cake ruined by the planner not knowing what is necessary to provide for safe delivery.  I really don't know what I would do in this situation, but I think I would at the very least tell them ahead of time what they need to so to make sure the cake arrives in good condition. Then I would not feel guilty if it doesn't arrive in good conditon.

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:00pm
post #4 of

AI would still supply the ice priced at your cost for the ice plus your regular markup, unless the wedding planner will be bringing her own ice.

indydebi Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:01pm
post #5 of

I have delivered cakes over an hour away; never used ice to pack them; in fact, they were surrounded by catering  equipment that held lots of hot food.  I've delivered 3 tier cakes fully assembled this way.  With a good delivery system (such as SPS), there should be no problem, especially since it's just a 2-tier.

Elcee Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:18pm
post #6 of

AKatieKake, I should clarify...of course I will give her instructions and tell her what my plan was. My questions were really shod I make the instructions into a cut attention-getting flier (like I do at work when I want people to actually read something) and, do I charge her for the ice?

greentea31 Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:24pm
post #7 of

Like KatieKake said.... After you hand it over to the wedding planner I think it should be out of hands. It would be HER responsibility to keep PERFECT. She declined your guaranteed safe delivery so you shouldn't bend over backwards too much for her. Only provide the ice at a small extra fee. Or tell her to bring her own. Hope you get this settled soon. Best wishes. :) 

Elcee Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:36pm
post #8 of

ASorry about the typos. I wrote the OP on my laptop but am replying on my iPhone. Thanks everyone. I am going to email her with my instructions and recommendations this afternoon and really stress the importance of keeping the ac on high, driving really carefully, etc. The wedding is Wednesday. Very nervous about this one for some reason.

Elcee Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 8:45pm
post #9 of

This is what I've written up so far. I know it's probably overkill but I do use butter in my buttercream and the sun gets very intense here due to being in the southwest and the high altitude. What do you think?                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  Your cake will be VERY COLD when I transfer it to you. It will be constructed and packaged for a safe delivery, providing the following recommendations are observed.

  • The cake must be placed on a flat area in your vehicle. The back of an SUV is ideal, the floor a second choice, never a seat. I will provide non-skid material to help keep it from sliding.
  • Consider packing a couple of bags of ice around the cake box. Bring 2 large plastic bags and the ice. (I can supply the ice and the plastic for a small fee.)
  • Plan to keep your air conditioning on full blast for the entire ride. (I typically wear shoes and socks, a sweater, and gloves when I make cake deliveries that are more than a few minutes away on hot and sunny days.)
  • Drive slowly and carefully, paying extra attention to curves; avoid sudden stops. Plan extra time to get to your destination.
  • Upon arrival at your destination, remove cake from its box and place on a sturdy, level table capable of supporting its weight. This table should be in a temperature controlled environment that is 68-72o and away from known heat sources such as direct or indirect sun, high intensity lights, etc.

 

Sorry, the cut and paste got a little funky.

 

Thanks!

jason_kraft Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 8:48pm

AI assume you also have a separate agreement that says you have no responsibility for the cake once she drives away.

Spooky_789 Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 8:57pm

Is that cake for a delivery this Wednesday?  In our record breaking temps?  I hope it's going west and not south or east.  It's 101 here already in Pueblo, just shy of 3:00 pm.  Even hotter down the Arkansas Valley. 

 

I'd also tell her to make sure that while it is in the vehicle that the cake box is not sitting in the direct sunlight, even if the A/C is on.

liz at sugar Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 9:04pm

That $150 delivery fee is not only for delivery of the cake, but your expertise to get it there safely.  I personally would take photos of the cake in pristine condition upon it leaving your premises, next to a copy of the delivery waiver the wedding planner signed.  After that, maybe she should be the one researching the proper care and handling of buttercream in extreme temperatures.

 

Why give away all the things you have taken years to learn about properly delivering the cake?  I don't get it.  I'm obviously in the minority here, but you are the professional for a reason.

 

Liz
 

Elcee Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 9:05pm

AJason, yes, I have a disclaimer for her to sign.

Spooky, YES! She's driving it from CS to Canon City! On 115! The box I use should keep the sun off it, at least.

Elcee Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 9:38pm

I just talked to her and it sounds like she is receptive to doing whatever it takes to get the cake there safely. Whew!

howsweet Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 10:41pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi 

I have delivered cakes over an hour away; never used ice to pack them; in fact, they were surrounded by catering  equipment that held lots of hot food.  I've delivered 3 tier cakes fully assembled this way.  With a good delivery system (such as SPS), there should be no problem, especially since it's just a 2-tier.


Same here. And in the summer time and in Houston. I also don't refrigerate my cakes before the trip and I use wooden dowels and a center dowel going through the base. I've never had a cake adversely effected by delivery, except the one that was in a fender bender. The first year of doing cakes, delivery was so stressful until I learned that as long as you properly stack it, it will be just fine.

 

When i have a customer pick up a two tier cake, I suggest it sit on the driver's side floor board if there's room and they can keep an eye on it as they drive. Never had a problem with that either, including this 4 tier cake.

wildflowercakes Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 10:55pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 


Same here. And in the summer time and in Houston. I also don't refrigerate my cakes before the trip and I use wooden dowels and a center dowel going through the base. I've never had a cake adversely effected by delivery, except the one that was in a fender bender. The first year of doing cakes, delivery was so stressful until I learned that as long as you properly stack it, it will be just fine.

 

When i have a customer pick up a two tier cake, I suggest it sit on the driver's side floor board if there's room and they can keep an eye on it as they drive. Never had a problem with that either, including this 4 tier cake.

Don't the pedals get in the wayicon_biggrin.gif lol Do you mean passenger side?

DeliciousDesserts Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 10:55pm

AElcee, message me your email. I have a pick up instruction guide in my event contract. I think it could help.

What you've written is great. I also think you should include the part about walking in the venue & clearing a path/warning employees.

wildflowercakes Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 10:56pm

love this cake by the wayicon_smile.gif

costumeczar Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 11:01pm

If it's refrigerated beforehand, in a box and on a non-skid mat a two-tiered cake will be fine. I deliver cakes all the tome for long distances and there's usually a gravel road involved at some point in the trip. Having it in the fridge overnight beforehand is the key to not having them shimmy all over, and only being two tiers it's less likely to have an issue.

howsweet Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 11:05pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildflowercakes 

Don't the pedals get in the wayicon_biggrin.gif lol Do you mean passenger side?


No, it will fit if you sit on one foot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hahahaha - just kidding! Thanks, yes, I meant the passenger side!

cakesbycathy Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 12:17am

I tell anyone that picks up their own cake that they should drive like there is a baby in the car without a seatbelt on icon_smile.gif
 

Elcee Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 1:53am

Thanks, everyone! Indydebi and howsweet and costumeczar, I would (will) feel much more confident when I have a few more difficult deliveries under my own belt. Sending a cake on its way without me under the most difficult conditions so far is really scary icon_razz.gif. You know how there's people who, no matter how much you emphasize something to them, they just don't believe it?

 

Delicious Desserts, thanks, I'd love to see the clause in your contract. Venue's not much of an issue as the wedding is in a private home.

 

cakesbycathy, good analogy, I think I'll mention that to her.

 

Thanks again, everyone! A little piece of me knows it'll be fine and I'm just driving myself crazy about it!

costumeczar Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 2:36am

If it makes you feel better, I sent a cake out with a client a couple of weeks ago. It was two tiers, double barrel bottom with a regular top tier. It was in a packing box, and when they got to the site the MOB put it on the cake table. The FOB came along, didn't know the cake was in it, picked the box up and tossed it on the ground. It was slightly wonky but they were able to fix it enough that it wasn't obvious. The cake was cold when it left my house, and I think that I'd put a dowel through the two tiers since I wasn't delivering it, so I'd say that as long as the planner you're dealing with doesn't start tossing the box around it will be fine. Cakes really are not that fragile as long as they're cold, and they stay cold for a good long while after you take them out of the fridge as long as they're boxed. I'm going to put the pictures of the tossed-cake on my blog at some point...

Elcee Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 2:48am
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

If it makes you feel better, I sent a cake out with a client a couple of weeks ago. It was two tiers, double barrel bottom with a regular top tier. It was in a packing box, and when they got to the site the MOB put it on the cake table. The FOB came along, didn't know the cake was in it, picked the box up and tossed it on the ground. It was slightly wonky but they were able to fix it enough that it wasn't obvious. The cake was cold when it left my house, and I think that I'd put a dowel through the two tiers since I wasn't delivering it, so I'd say that as long as the planner you're dealing with doesn't start tossing the box around it will be fine. Cakes really are not that fragile as long as they're cold, and they stay cold for a good long while after you take them out of the fridge as long as they're boxed. I'm going to put the pictures of the tossed-cake on my blog at some point...

Good grief! Tossed it on the floor?!

 

I do have a nice packing box for it. I think I should chill it in the box, yes?

indydebi Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 2:56am

The phrase I used with customer pick-ups was:  "Drive like you have a baby velcroed to the top of your car." icon_wink.gif

leah_s Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 3:07am

AId also tell her to bring a level to check the table before placing the cake. I always did that. Sometimes we'd have to put something under a leg.

lorieleann Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 3:37am

AI also write on the box "KEEP BOX LEVEL" because that is something that people don't consciously think of when picking up a box.

Also, if you put a cake on the floor of a car driving on a hot highway, there is a lot of heat coming up from the floor. I usually suggest insulating the bottom of the box by laying down a few folded beach towels under.

If the road is windy and hilly, you might get more security to drive two center dowels though the cake and into the drum instead of just one.

costumeczar Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 10:15am

A

Original message sent by Elcee

Good grief! Tossed it on the floor?!

I do have a nice packing box for it. I think I should chill it in the box, yes?

I leave them in the fridge by themselves when I'm done decorating, then put them in the box with the non-skid mat underneath in the box and tape it up when it's time to deliver them. By the time I take them out they've likely been in the fridge for at least 18-24 hours.

810whitechoc Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 11:11am
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

If it makes you feel better, I sent a cake out with a client a couple of weeks ago. It was two tiers, double barrel bottom with a regular top tier. It was in a packing box, and when they got to the site the MOB put it on the cake table. The FOB came along, didn't know the cake was in it, picked the box up and tossed it on the ground. It was slightly wonky but they were able to fix it enough that it wasn't obvious. The cake was cold when it left my house, and I think that I'd put a dowel through the two tiers since I wasn't delivering it, so I'd say that as long as the planner you're dealing with doesn't start tossing the box around it will be fine. Cakes really are not that fragile as long as they're cold, and they stay cold for a good long while after you take them out of the fridge as long as they're boxed. I'm going to put the pictures of the tossed-cake on my blog at some point...

Hilarious, I would have paid money to hear what the MOB said to the FOB!

Sweet_Cakes Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 12:30pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by howsweet 


No, it will fit if you sit on one foot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hahahaha - just kidding! Thanks, yes, I meant the passenger side!

LOL...my eyes bugged out for a second...then I scrolled lower!

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