cakeandparty Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 6:07pm
post #1 of

I have to make about 800 cake balls. Is there an easier way to mass produce them? has anyone poured chocolate over a bunch of them instead of dipping each one by one?

 

any suggestions would be appreciated

18 replies
bakencake Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 6:13pm
post #2 of

have you heard of this? I have a friend who makes balls and this is what she uses.  she says it works.  as far as dipping in chocolate, she does it on her own.

http://ediblecrafts.craftgossip.com/cake-ball-roller/2011/03/27/

SPCOhio Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 6:32pm
post #3 of

AStupid question time: I thought cake balls were a combination of cake and icing, but this video seems to be showcasing just a slab of cake that gets rolled into ball form-is that right? Every cake ball I have had has been overwhelmingly sweet and contained icing as a binding agent. Is there another way?

bct806 Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 7:21pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by SPCOhio 

Stupid question time: I thought cake balls were a combination of cake and icing, but this video seems to be showcasing just a slab of cake that gets rolled into ball form-is that right? Every cake ball I have had has been overwhelmingly sweet and contained icing as a binding agent. Is there another way?

You still use icing to bind it. Otherwise it would be a crumbly mess. Then you compact it into that shape so you can roll it. 

cakeandparty Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 8:25pm
post #5 of

I think making this many cake ball will be a one time thing... so not wanting to purchase new equipment, thanks for posting.

 

can't I just roll like 50 of them at a time place them close together on a wire rack and pour the chocolate over?
 

sixinarow Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 8:42pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakencake 

have you heard of this? I have a friend who makes balls and this is what she uses.  she says it works.  as far as dipping in chocolate, she does it on her own.

http://ediblecrafts.craftgossip.com/cake-ball-roller/2011/03/27/

Mind. Blown. I hate rolling out individual balls, that would save SO much time!

motherofgrace Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 8:45pm
post #7 of

no then they wouldnt be covered properly. You charge more based on the amount of time it takes.
 

bct806 Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 10:01pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by motherofgrace 

no then they wouldnt be covered properly. You charge more based on the amount of time it takes.
 

Agreed. The bottom wouldn't have chocolate on it. There isn't a shortcut I can think of for the chocolate part. You can make them little by little and freeze them so it isn't so much all at once. 

lorieleann Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 12:14am
post #9 of

cake balls really do hold well, especially if wrapped individually wrapped and in the fridge. THis means you can make ahead and store them. I wouldn't freeze them or let them get too cold because that will cause cracking when them came to room temperature.  

 

Cake balls really are a bear to make.  And slow too because you have to work with small batches so that they are the right temp. Charge accordingly (especially for an electric warmer for the melts/chocolate. well worth the $15 with the 50% coupon from michaels).  If this is a donation or a one time thing, I'd suggest trying to do some mini cupcakes (those are much less time sucking). 

lcubed83 Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 4:03am

I just did about 150 cake balls a couple of weeks ago.  I found a site that described the technique I ended up using (can't remember, sorry)

 

1.  roll your balls.  Chill

2.  dip bottom half of ball in coating. Let drip.  Place on pan and chill

3.  Put balls on wire rack with enough space that you can maneuver the spoon, then ladle coating, going quickly down the line.  Let set, then carefully remove from wire rack.

 

It worked well for me.  Also solved the "no coating on the bottom" problem.

motherofgrace Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 12:23pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by lcubed83 

I just did about 150 cake balls a couple of weeks ago.  I found a site that described the technique I ended up using (can't remember, sorry)

 

1.  roll your balls.  Chill

2.  dip bottom half of ball in coating. Let drip.  Place on pan and chill

3.  Put balls on wire rack with enough space that you can maneuver the spoon, then ladle coating, going quickly down the line.  Let set, then carefully remove from wire rack.

 

It worked well for me.  Also solved the "no coating on the bottom" problem.


but if you were dipping half to start, why not just dip it all? sounds like extra work to me

kaylawaylalayla Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 3:47pm

ADepending on the look you're going for you could hand roll them.

lcubed83 Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 6:57pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by motherofgrace 


but if you were dipping half to start, why not just dip it all? sounds like extra work to me

I found the overall end result was neater doing the two-stop method.  When I dip/roll the whole ball, I tend to get a mess sliding it off the fork or spoon onto the tray.  This way I didn't have to move each ball until it was set.

Peanut-Butter Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 7:49pm

AJust been showing my partner who is a keen carp fisher the video of the cake ball maker and he wasn't as impressed as I was.. Apparently this is just like a Boilie maker (carp food) and I've looked and it is!

See the link here from a UK tackle shop https://www.tacklebox.co.uk/bait-making/rolling-tables/#product38000

You can get one for making 24mm 'cake pops' for £30.99

Hehe I guess men are good for something

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 8:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Peanut-Butter 

Just been showing my partner who is a keen carp fisher the video of the cake ball maker and he wasn't as impressed as I was.. Apparently this is just like a Boilie maker (carp food) and I've looked and it is!

See the link here from a UK tackle shop
https://www.tacklebox.co.uk/bait-making/rolling-tables/#product38000

You can get one for making 24mm 'cake pops' for £30.99

Hehe I guess men are good for something


The roller is a total rip off of other tools, lol. They just added the words 'cake pops'.

They are meant to work with box mix cakes with no frosting, you knead it into a playdough consistency. A quick CC search on them will find you a ton of bakers who regret spending the money.

 

I have never actually had a really large order for cake balls, it's always cake pops, with the stick. I have done the two dip method that lcubed explained though, it is definitely faster than completely dipping each one at a time. As long as your chocolate isn't too thick, it covers smoothly too.

I keep mine in a crockpot on low to keep it melted and just set up the TV in front of my work station, lol.

 

I do everything in steps when I have such a large order. Make all the cake frosting mixture, then portion each one out, then roll each one, etc. I find if you do them in small batches at a time instead, you end up wasting a lot of time. (at least I do)

kaylawaylalayla Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 10:10pm

this carp bait thing intrigues me. does the tool work for cake pops at all? maybe even ganache?

BakerBee7468 Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 10:52pm

ACouldn't you just buy cake pop pans then dip in icing? Saves time having to roll them. The whole that's there for the stick could easily be covered up.

kaylawaylalayla Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 11:15pm

rereading my comment, I realize it might seem silly.

what I meant by hand rolling, is when you already have your cake pops rolled out however you decide to do it, you cover them in (chocolate? candy melts?) using your hands instead of forks. dip one hand into the chocolate and use your other to place a ball in the chocolate. use the chocolate hand to pick up the ball. Using only the palm of your clean hand and your chocolate hand, roll the cake ball until completely coated. use your clean hand to place on parchment. i'm sure you probably get what I meant, but just incase.

this will work if you are doing simple decorations like sprinkles or striping. but if you are monogramming them or something like that you made need to dip.

lcubed83 Posted 12 Jun 2013 , 2:13pm

There is a video showing a baker covering petit fours with his hands.  That was part of my inspiration to do a large drying rack full, but I used a large spoon instead of my hand, after dipping the bottoms.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EuAoi5f_3ks

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