Do You Hear From Each Customers?

Decorating By Cakestable Updated 24 Mar 2014 , 3:17pm by howsweet

Cakestable Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 12:39pm
post #1 of 28

Do you get feed back from each customers?  When I dont get a feed back from customers I get worried and think what went wrong with my cake?  Is that normal? How do i rectify this issue?

27 replies
DeliciousDesserts Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 12:49pm
post #2 of 28

Oh, I know.  It makes me a bit crazy!  

 

No, not everyone calls me to tell me how much they liked the   Sometimes, and I love those.

 

Aside from contacting them to ask, I have no suggestions.  It's part of doing business.  I don't always tell the restaurant that I enjoyed my dinner.  When it is exceptional, I do.  When I get what I expect, I don't.  When I get busy, or distracted and it's been too long since dinner, I don't.

 

Sometimes, no news is good news.

j92383 Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 1:40pm
post #3 of 28

It drives me crazy not hearing anything so I started sending out an email 24 hours after I deliver an order  that states 

 
Thank you again for your recent order. We hope that you enjoyed your Banana Cream Cake. If you have any concerns or comments regarding your order please reply to this email. Our customers are very important to us and we value your opinions and suggestions.
 
 
 
Thank you and we hope to serve you again,
 
So far everyone but one person has taken the time to write back. I rather if there is a problem that they let me know rather than have them complain to others. (so far I've had no complaints)

Cakestable Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 1:49pm
post #4 of 28

Mm this is a good idea! Will send a follow up email to my clients.

Sweet_Cakes Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 2:56pm
post #5 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by j92383 

It drives me crazy not hearing anything so I started sending out an email 24 hours after I deliver an order  that states 

 
Thank you again for your recent order. We hope that you enjoyed your Banana Cream Cake. If you have any concerns or comments regarding your order please reply to this email. Our customers are very important to us and we value your opinions and suggestions.
 
 
 
Thank you and we hope to serve you again,
 
So far everyone but one person has taken the time to write back. I rather if there is a problem that they let me know rather than have them complain to others. (so far I've had no complaints)

I think that this is an AWESOME idea!

Norasmom Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 4:11pm
post #6 of 28

The only way I can tell that people liked my cake is through receiving another order from them.  Once in awhile I will get a photo sent as well, with a smiling face, but that's rare.  It's very difficult to  get feedback on cakes, unfortunately.

Brettley Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 4:16pm
post #7 of 28

I get about a 50/50 response from customers. And the ones I don't hear from; I operate under the impression that no news is good news. And most order again or book for the date next year so I just assume that I am doing something right.

cakealicious7 Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 4:47pm
post #8 of 28

ABefore I started baking i used to order from someone else not too far from me, i absolutely love her cakes but did not always have the time after a party to give feedback. Don't worry about it if they haven't replied to you- no news is good news!!

ellavanilla Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 6:05pm
post #9 of 28

I'm with the no news/good news policy. If I have a problem with a vendor I will contact them. I really don't want to be bothered after the fact. I say put out your best product and let your revenues build your confidence.

Cakestable Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 6:31pm
post #10 of 28

Thank you all.  My husband has been saying the same thing as you guys!  No news is good news.

maryintucson Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 6:55pm
post #11 of 28

I agree that no news is good news. (Though I'm not a cake professional.) I have to respectfully disagree with people that email their customers to say thank you for your business. I don't think it's necessary. From a consumer standpoint, I get really annoyed at the amount of email I get. I don't like that every entity I have ever done business with that has my email feels they have the right to continue to contact me. I do respond to customer satisfaction surveys though if I had a particularly positive experience with a service or product. 

jason_kraft Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 7:25pm
post #12 of 28

A

Original message sent by maryintucson

I agree that no news is good news. (Though I'm not a cake professional.) I have to respectfully disagree with people that email their customers to say thank you for your business. I don't think it's necessary. From a consumer standpoint, I get really annoyed at the amount of email I get. I don't like that every entity I have ever done business with that has my email feels they have the right to continue to contact me. I do respond to customer satisfaction surveys though if I had a particularly positive experience with a service or product. 

It may depend on the event as well. If your made a wedding cake for a customer I don't think they would mind an email congratulating them on their nuptials (and by the way, thanking them for their business). For a birthday or anniversary cake it's probably not warranted.

j92383 Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 7:50pm
post #13 of 28

For me the issue isn't confidence it's about customer service.

 

96% of unhappy customers don’t complain, however 91% of those will simply leave and never come back – 1st Financial Training services

Since most people won't initiate a complaint if you are proactive an give a chance to express their concern it's better for your business.

 

Dissatisfied customers whose complaints are taken care of are more likely to remain loyal, and even become advocates, as those that are ‘just’ customers – Strauss & Seidel

 

Adissatisfied customer will tell between 9-15 people about their experience. Around 13% of dissatisfied customers tell more than 20 people. – White House Office of Consumer Affairs

 

70% of buying experiences are based on how the customer feels they are being treated – McKinsey

So taking a second to send a simple email to thank them is part of giving a little extra customer service and completely different from spamming someone with a ton of emails.  After that there would be no further emails unless the client had a complaint.

maryintucson Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 8:02pm
post #14 of 28

Respectfully Jason...Yesterday I went to small butcher and dropped a rather large sum of money on pork to make sausage for an upcoming event. I later went to Walmart and dropped even money for assorted stuff for this event. Neither called or wrote to congratulate me and thank me for my business. My point is, internet commerce provides an opportunity for businesses to be intrusive. Vendors are not friends. For a wedding a person might use 50 vendors. So they all decide to be friendly after the fact and say thank you? That's a little obnoxious I think. But, again, I am a S.A.H.M. People have to look after their bottom line I understand. If the cake was good and a good value, if they got a lot of attention for it, they will be back for more and send business your way.

cakealicious7 Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 8:22pm
post #15 of 28

AI think walmart or your local butchers is slightly different than your baker- especially if they bake from home, sending an e-mail or text message to thank them for their hard work shows appreciation. It gives bakers that ' motivation ' to work to the best of their abilities and shows gratitude, I love being praised for my work and enjoy praising other's.

jason_kraft Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 8:25pm
post #16 of 28

A

Original message sent by maryintucson

Respectfully Jason...Yesterday I went to small butcher and dropped a rather large sum of money on pork to make sausage for an upcoming event. I later went to Walmart and dropped even money for assorted stuff for this event. Neither called or wrote to congratulate me and thank me for my business. My point is, internet commerce provides an opportunity for businesses to be intrusive. Vendors are not friends. For a wedding a person might use 50 vendors. So they all decide to be friendly after the fact and say thank you? That's a little obnoxious I think. But, again, I am a S.A.H.M. People have to look after their bottom line I understand. If the cake was good and a good value, if they got a lot of attention for it, they will be back for more and send business your way.

Buying a bunch of meat from a butcher or shopping at Walmart is a very different situation from working closely with a baker on a custom cake that is tailored to your event. You are right that vendors are not friends, but as a vendor who provides a custom product for such an important event it is not unusual to foster a relationship with a customer. I would think that most people probably wouldn't view a congrats email from such a vendor as obnoxious.

In our business we got to know several customers pretty well just by providing custom birthday cakes for their kids. For our regular customers I would even proactively contact them a month before their kids' birthdays if it looked like the schedule was filling up faster than usual, just to make sure we could fit them in.

j92383 Posted 4 Jun 2013 , 9:36pm
post #17 of 28

Totally agree with Jason buying from walmart or the butcher is not the same as a custom cake. I had a retail location where people were coming in buying a cupcake I wouldn't bother. But when you are offering a custom higher end product it's different.

 

I do understand about the intrusive nature of some retail establishment and the crazy amount of emails some of them send you. I always have to go unsubscribe or request that they take me off their mailing list. But if one send me an email thanking or asking me to do a survey I have no problem with that.  

Sweet_Cakes Posted 5 Jun 2013 , 11:13am
post #18 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by j92383 

For me the issue isn't confidence it's about customer service.

 

96% of unhappy customers don’t complain, however 91% of those will simply leave and never come back – 1st Financial Training services

Since most people won't initiate a complaint if you are proactive an give a chance to express their concern it's better for your business.

 

Dissatisfied customers whose complaints are taken care of are more likely to remain loyal, and even become advocates, as those that are ‘just’ customers – Strauss & Seidel

 

Adissatisfied customer will tell between 9-15 people about their experience. Around 13% of dissatisfied customers tell more than 20 people. – White House Office of Consumer Affairs

 

70% of buying experiences are based on how the customer feels they are being treated – McKinsey

So taking a second to send a simple email to thank them is part of giving a little extra customer service and completely different from spamming someone with a ton of emails.  After that there would be no further emails unless the client had a complaint.

I love this! Sums up what I believe for customer service. After all, we are in the business of customer service as well.

Sweet_Cakes Posted 5 Jun 2013 , 11:17am
post #19 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


Buying a bunch of meat from a butcher or shopping at Walmart is a very different situation from working closely with a baker on a custom cake that is tailored to your event. You are right that vendors are not friends, but as a vendor who provides a custom product for such an important event it is not unusual to foster a relationship with a customer. I would think that most people probably wouldn't view a congrats email from such a vendor as obnoxious.

In our business we got to know several customers pretty well just by providing custom birthday cakes for their kids. For our regular customers I would even proactively contact them a month before their kids' birthdays if it looked like the schedule was filling up faster than usual, just to make sure we could fit them in.

I have to agree with Jason on this one. This is the way to create repeat business; by fostering relationships with your clients. A few decades ago, this was not uncommon. Local butchers KNEW every customer. Locel grocery stores KNEW every customer. Yes, our world changing, but small companies and businesses are known for fostering relationships with their clients even today.

NHQUEEN Posted 5 Jun 2013 , 7:42pm
post #20 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sweet_Cakes 

I have to agree with Jason on this one. This is the way to create repeat business; by fostering relationships with your clients. A few decades ago, this was not uncommon. Local butchers KNEW every customer. Locel grocery stores KNEW every customer. Yes, our world changing, but small companies and businesses are known for fostering relationships with their clients even today.

Sweet_Cakes well stated, I agree with you 100%.

erin2345 Posted 5 Jun 2013 , 7:59pm
post #21 of 28

Sometimes I will send an email a few days later saying something along the lines of, "Hope you enjoyed your cake!" and some small talk about how the venue looked beautiful etc., and I will include a link to the picture of the cake on my Facebook page.  Most of the time they will leave wonderful comments under the cake picture, and then you know they loved the cake :)

Sweet_Cakes Posted 6 Jun 2013 , 10:59am
post #22 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by erin2345 

Sometimes I will send an email a few days later saying something along the lines of, "Hope you enjoyed your cake!" and some small talk about how the venue looked beautiful etc., and I will include a link to the picture of the cake on my Facebook page.  Most of the time they will leave wonderful comments under the cake picture, and then you know they loved the cake :)

I like this idea as well! Companies are fast becoming major Facebook users. By getting your clients to Like your Facebook page, this is a way of knowing how many fans you have!

indydebi Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 3:58pm
post #23 of 28

As a former business, I didn't contact each customer to solicit feedback, but I did treasure the feedback that I DID receive.  "No news is good news".

 

As a consumer, I resent emails that ask for feedback.  If there is a problem, I'll tell you.  If it was WAY above-and-beyond, I'll tell you.

 

I will also share that when I hired the caterer (MCL Cafeteria) for my son's wedding rehearsal dinner a couple of years ago ( and yes, it DID pain me to pay someone else to do that!), I wrote a glowing letter on all of the above-and-beyond's they did and everything they did right.  Everyone was shocked that a "cafeteria" could do sucha  fabulous job on the salmon and chicken cordon bleu.  My niece also works for MCL but in another city and she called me to say, "Debi!!  Your letter got a full page in our corporate company newsletter!"  I am confident that I would never have written such a glowing letter had I been responding to a "how did I do?" email.

 

I have always put a higher value in from-the-heart feedback as opposed to one that hints of being solicited.  

Sweet_Cakes Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 4:13pm
post #24 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi 

As a former business, I didn't contact each customer to solicit feedback, but I did treasure the feedback that I DID receive.  "No news is good news".

 

As a consumer, I resent emails that ask for feedback.  If there is a problem, I'll tell you.  If it was WAY above-and-beyond, I'll tell you.

 

I will also share that when I hired the caterer (MCL Cafeteria) for my son's wedding rehearsal dinner a couple of years ago ( and yes, it DID pain me to pay someone else to do that!), I wrote a glowing letter on all of the above-and-beyond's they did and everything they did right.  Everyone was shocked that a "cafeteria" could do sucha  fabulous job on the salmon and chicken cordon bleu.  My niece also works for MCL but in another city and she called me to say, "Debi!!  Your letter got a full page in our corporate company newsletter!"  I am confident that I would never have written such a glowing letter had I been responding to a "how did I do?" email.

 

I have always put a higher value in from-the-heart feedback as opposed to one that hints of being solicited.  

I somewhat agree with this. BUT...I still like the idea of emailing your customer thanking them for the business and providing a link to the picture of the cake on the website/Facebook.

howsweet Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 11:22pm
post #25 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by indydebi 

As a former business, I didn't contact each customer to solicit feedback, but I did treasure the feedback that I DID receive.  "No news is good news".

 

As a consumer, I resent emails that ask for feedback.  If there is a problem, I'll tell you.  If it was WAY above-and-beyond, I'll tell you.

 

I will also share that when I hired the caterer (MCL Cafeteria) for my son's wedding rehearsal dinner a couple of years ago ( and yes, it DID pain me to pay someone else to do that!), I wrote a glowing letter on all of the above-and-beyond's they did and everything they did right.  Everyone was shocked that a "cafeteria" could do sucha  fabulous job on the salmon and chicken cordon bleu.  My niece also works for MCL but in another city and she called me to say, "Debi!!  Your letter got a full page in our corporate company newsletter!"  I am confident that I would never have written such a glowing letter had I been responding to a "how did I do?" email.

 

I have always put a higher value in from-the-heart feedback as opposed to one that hints of being solicited.  


I tend to agree. I do the best job I possibly can, which in my opinion, also includes being non intrusive. I don't think there is any customer who will be irritated because I didn't call or email them after their party, but plenty who will be if I do contact them. I get that some people appreciate it, but you can't always please everybody.

Cakejeanie Posted 24 Mar 2014 , 10:25am
post #26 of 28

I realise I'm reviving a thread that's a few months old. I searched the topic because I, too, am unsure about whether to contact customers about how they liked their cake, etc.

 

Seeing as we don't really know which customers will appreciate being contacted after their event, perhaps a solution would be to mention the fact during delivery of the cake, or in the case of weddings, during the signing of contracts. For example 'Thanks so much for ordering your cake from me. I hope you have a great party. If you have feedback or comments about the cake, please don't hesitate to let me know.' 

 

What do you think? Good idea? Bad? 

MimiFix Posted 24 Mar 2014 , 2:55pm
post #27 of 28

There might be too much going on for the customer to remember, but it couldn't hurt.

howsweet Posted 24 Mar 2014 , 3:16pm
post #28 of 28

That sounds fine, I suppose, but for my personal  taste, it's still too heavy handed. And that means at least some customers will also see it as such.  I'd want them to leave the cake and get out of my hair, so that's what I do for them. They're having to deal with all the other venders - the balloon person, the candy person, the entertainment, the caterer, etc.  I want to be easy, breezy and the last thing I'm going to be saying at the cake delivery is, hey how 'bout some feedback. Beside, the cake is perfect, right? So I'd just be asking for compliments. I'm sure not going to imply "if you have any problems".

 

It's Monday and I've already had positive feedback from half of my cake orders for last weekend. If people have something to say, in my experience, they'll say it.

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%