vgcea Posted 3 Jun 2013 , 5:09pm
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AOne tip I read somewhere-- probably Erica O'Brien's blog-- was to keep the fridge temp as high as possible bringing it closer to room temperature. So that the fondant cake is cool not cold when it's brought out leading to less ccondensation. Haven't tried this yet though. Do you do anything different for your cake fridge vs your regular fridge?

6 replies
SculptedSweets Posted 3 Jun 2013 , 6:53pm
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AThat may be a good idea, might have to try that!

Original message sent by vgcea

One tip I read somewhere-- probably Erica O'Brien's blog-- was to keep the fridge temp as high as possible bringing it closer to room temperature. So that the fondant cake is cool not cold when it's brought out leading to less ccondensation. Haven't tried this yet though. Do you do anything different for your cake fridge vs your regular fridge?

vgcea Posted 3 Jun 2013 , 8:15pm
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AIf you do please let me know how it turns out.

indydebi Posted 10 Jun 2013 , 4:21pm
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You don't mention if it's a home or shop environment but regardless, I will share that in my shop, my health inspector would check the temp in the wallk-in refrigerator and it had better not ever have read higher than 41 degrees.  If that is a factor, you might check the requirements.

 

My question, though, is that if it's at room temp, why is it in a refrigerator to start with?

vgcea Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 5:56am
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AWelcome back Indydebi. It's a separate home (not commercial type) fridge but used solely for finished cakes. I have second fridge for ingredients and the like that's kept super cold (way < 41F).

I agree with the point that inspectors would require = 41F especially for TTC foods but these cakes would be non-TTC, non perishable fillings, which would ordinarily be at room temp (Cottage Food Law requirements).

The purpose of cooling would be to keep the cake cool before transport in TX heat but avoid the condensation if possible.

To answer your question. I guess she's referring to ideal room temp (68-77F) which would be off from actual room temps-- which in Texas summer is quite high.

indydebi Posted 11 Jun 2013 , 6:07am
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sounds like you have a plan!  Glad to hear it is just for finished cakes.  After I posted, I thought about how other foods and their aromas would mix in a 'warm' refrigerator.thumbs_up.gif

vgcea Posted 13 Jun 2013 , 9:40am
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ALOL. Yep, those cakes would be 'finished' alright. I wonder what chicken flavored fondant would taste like. Hahaha!

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