How Do I Do A Fondant Inlay Like This?

Decorating By Birdyy Updated 30 May 2013 , 2:57am by bct806

Birdyy Posted 29 May 2013 , 5:09pm
post #1 of 9

Hi, I'm trying to make a quilted blanket out of fondant and I'd like it to look lsmooth and flat, like fabric. I understand the concept of doing a fondant inlay, but I have not been able to get the surface or edges of the fondant to be connected neatly.

Any ideas on how they got this inlay to be so smooth and seamless as the flowers are in this photo? Thanks! http://cakecentral.com/newsearch?search=fondant+inlay&type=61

8 replies
bct806 Posted 29 May 2013 , 5:28pm
post #2 of 9

You could message the person and ask them how they got the look. 

DeliciousDesserts Posted 29 May 2013 , 6:08pm
post #3 of 9

ABrokey linky so I can't see what you mean

Birdyy Posted 29 May 2013 , 6:15pm
post #4 of 9

sorry, let me try the link again thanks! I did just send this cake decorator my question, hope she can reply too! Thanks http://cakecentral.com/g/a/1366746/cake-dummy-from-colette-peters-class/

LisaPeps Posted 29 May 2013 , 6:42pm
post #5 of 9

AI would be surprised if she told you since she paid to take the class. I'd be inclined to decline you any information if I forked out $500+ for a Collette Peters workshop and someone asked me for the hints and tips.

Anyway... I would hazard a guess that either its cut out and inlayed with great precision or the shapes are rolled into the larger piece of fondant, though I would think that would be extremely difficult.

Annabakescakes Posted 29 May 2013 , 8:25pm
post #6 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 

I would be surprised if she told you since she paid to take the class. I'd be inclined to decline you any information if I forked out $500+ for a Collette Peters workshop and someone asked me for the hints and tips.

Anyway... I would hazard a guess that either its cut out and inlayed with great precision or the shapes are rolled into the larger piece of fondant, though I would think that would be extremely difficult.

I agree! If I took the class for $500+ and someone asked me for tips and tricks, I would say, "Sure, for $250+!"

bct806 Posted 29 May 2013 , 10:18pm
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by LisaPeps 

I would be surprised if she told you since she paid to take the class. I'd be inclined to decline you any information if I forked out $500+ for a Collette Peters workshop and someone asked me for the hints and tips.

Anyway... I would hazard a guess that either its cut out and inlayed with great precision or the shapes are rolled into the larger piece of fondant, though I would think that would be extremely difficult.

 

Agreed, but she hadn't posted the actual link. Just a link to the search she did. Was no way to know which cake it was.

Annabakescakes Posted 29 May 2013 , 11:57pm
post #8 of 9

A

Original message sent by bct806

[QUOTE name="LisaPeps" url="/t/759037/how-do-i-do-a-fondant-inlay-like-this#post_7398700"] I would be surprised if she told you since she paid to take the class. I'd be inclined to decline you any information if I forked out $500+ for a Collette Peters workshop and someone asked me for the hints and tips.

Anyway... I would hazard a guess that either its cut out and inlayed with great precision or the shapes are rolled into the larger piece of fondant, though I would think that would be extremely difficult.[/QUOTE]

Agreed, but she hadn't posted the actual link. Just a link to the search she did. Was no way to know which cake it was.

Exactly, except that she actually did post the link, it is in post #4 .

bct806 Posted 30 May 2013 , 2:57am
post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Annabakescakes 


Exactly, except that she actually did post the link, it is in post #4 .

Yes, I see that. However, my initial comment was before she posted that. I was just agreeing that I would be reluctant to give out the info after such a pricey class. When I said to ask, there was no way of knowing which cake she meant. Hence the past tense hadn't in my second post.

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