SaraLee08 Posted 25 May 2013 , 10:05pm
post #1 of

A[IMG][IMG][IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3017335/width/200/height/400[/IMG][/IMG][/IMG]

It was nice and firm when I finished it early this morning, by the time 1:00 came it started tilting and the back was Collapsing. Idk what went wrong

22 replies
car1979 Posted 25 May 2013 , 10:10pm
post #2 of

ADid you use support between the tiers looks like with the weight of ears and bow that has caused it to sink at that side.

Norasmom Posted 25 May 2013 , 10:13pm
post #3 of

Also, did you let it settle after you crumb-coated it?  It does look like the ears were too heavy.

kazita Posted 25 May 2013 , 10:19pm
post #4 of

ALooks like you need to let your cake settle. ...here's s thread about how to do that read the whole thread

cakecentral.com/t/633571/my-newest-trick/150#post_7397337

DeliciousDesserts Posted 26 May 2013 , 1:24am
post #5 of

AThat doesn't look like a settle problem. That looks like a support problem! The top cake is collapsing into the bottom tier.

Did you use any support?

Lili5768 Posted 26 May 2013 , 1:40am
post #6 of

Definitely looks like a support problem to me too.

 

You could take the tiers off and put in support dowels or what ever you use and re mount them.

Then fix around the edges as needed by adding balls or ribbon etc.

 

Good luck! Pretty cake though :)

arlenej Posted 26 May 2013 , 3:42pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lili5768 

Definitely looks like a support problem to me too.

 

You could take the tiers off and put in support dowels or what ever you use and re mount them.

Then fix around the edges as needed by adding balls or ribbon etc.

 

Good luck! Pretty cake though :)


For sure. what she said.

ysa Posted 27 May 2013 , 5:10am
post #8 of

Support problem sis. Specially when the cake is really moist and torted, we should use sturdy dowels,wooden dowels and strong board. Risk must me minimize coz in one unstable move we are doomed lolz.

SaraLee08 Posted 27 May 2013 , 8:49pm
post #9 of

AI used 5 wooden rods at the bottom and thats about it, do I need rods for the top? Im thinking I cut the rods too short cus they went all the way in and there was still space left between the cake and rods.

SaraLee08 Posted 27 May 2013 , 8:50pm

Athanks for everyones input btw :)

DeliciousDesserts Posted 27 May 2013 , 8:51pm

AYou don't need any in the top tier.

Original message sent by SaraLee08

Im thinking I cut the rods too short cus they went all the way in and there was still space left between the cake and rods.

Yes, too short.

Lili5768 Posted 28 May 2013 , 1:38am

I don't know how much the ears weigh but I can tell you what I do. 

 

When I put a figure on top, even if it's a small 4 inch or so, I put it on a piece of cardboard cut to fit the bottom, and put in a piece of dowel under it into the cake just to make sure.

 

The dowels were cut too short. They weren't really supporting much weight.  Hope you were able too fix it!
 

denetteb Posted 28 May 2013 , 3:34am

They need to be flush with the top of the icing/fondant or even a touch higher.  Too short and it will allow it to push into the cake like yours did.  If you have a heavy topper, like you used, you may want to put support in the top tier also.  Did you have your top tier on a cake cardboard?

Pearl123 Posted 28 May 2013 , 8:46am

My question also... did you use a cake board between the tiers or just the dowels?

SaraLee08 Posted 29 May 2013 , 6:53am

ANo I didnt use a cake board for the top tier, is that what I should use next time I make a 2 tiered cake?

vgcea Posted 29 May 2013 , 7:11am

A*face palm* Yes. Every tier needs a cake board under it. Whether two tiers or ten.

Cakechick123 Posted 29 May 2013 , 7:30am

without a board your dowels are absolutely useless. think of a two story house, the walls (dowels) support the top floor(board), the top floor (board) supports the structure on top. Without the board the dowels just pushed straight though the top cake

denetteb Posted 29 May 2013 , 2:35pm

YES!!!  Problem finally solved.  Dowels alone do nothing to provide support.  Dowels are like table legs and the cake cardboard like the table top.  Picture setting a casserole on just table legs with no top...does nothing.  Same thing with dowels.  The cardboard sits on the dowels below it like a little table and the upper tier sits on it.  That way the weight of the upper tier doesn't squish the lower tier.  With you not using a cardboard the dowels just pressed up into the upper tier and did nothing.  What really happens is that you put your tiers on a cardboard as you are working on them and icing them.  It gives you a nice bottom surface for moving them around and the edge of the cardboard is a nice guide for when you are applying your icing.  When done with the cake you put the dowels in the lower tier and place the cake with its cardboard on top and then you have a properly supported cake.

denetteb Posted 29 May 2013 , 2:36pm

Oops, I hadn't read page two before I posted, just saw the OP post and replied, then saw there were other  posts addressing the cardboard.

vgcea Posted 29 May 2013 , 2:43pm

ABut you explained it so much better.

Original message sent by denetteb

Oops, I hadn't read page two before I posted, just saw the OP post and replied, then saw there were other  posts addressing the cardboard.

wildflowercakes Posted 29 May 2013 , 3:19pm

Cute cake sorry this happened.

Lili5768 Posted 29 May 2013 , 9:35pm

Mystery is solved!!! :))) It wasn't just no dowels, it was no cardboard too!! LOL! You ladies are the best!

 

Thank God for cakers!! :)

SaraLee08 Posted 30 May 2013 , 1:03am

AYes thank you everyone! I now know what to do next time!! :) :)

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