mcaulir Posted 18 May 2013 , 10:03pm
post #1 of

I want to pipe something like the arches on the second tier of this cake:

 

http://www.flickr.com/photos/58907930@N04/8273662105/in/photostream/

 

I can pipe those pointing down rather than up - but my arches are very untidy, and I'm sure I'm doing something wrong.

 

I've been googling tutorials, but can't find anything that shows me that.

 

Does anyone have any advice (apart from practice more - I'm all over that, but I'm sure there's a technique I'm missing), or a tutorial they can point me towards?

 

Thanks!

11 replies
nikki4199 Posted 18 May 2013 , 10:07pm
post #2 of

Have you looked tutorials up under string work. I think they use royal icing!  I have seen it also called oriental string work. Hope that helpsicon_smile.gif
 

sewsugarqueen Posted 19 May 2013 , 12:27am
post #3 of

It's done with royal icing(string work)  Most important is marking off spaces before you start using a measuring tape or paper you put around cake and then mark off evenly.  Practice working on sides of cakes... it's so much easier piping something flat like a cookie.

  I have been taught to use real egg whites for royal icing when piping like this... much stronger

mcaulir Posted 19 May 2013 , 1:00am
post #4 of

Yes, I've been using royal icing.

 

I found this video for oriental stringwork (oriental was the word I was missing!):

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dVn-iwdvZro

 

where the arches pointing upwards are done by flipping the cake over.

 

Is that what everyone does? So in the cake I posted earlier, would the second tier be turned over to pipe those arches? Because I can do that. I thought there was a way people were piping those neat arches with the cake sitting upright.

remnant3333 Posted 19 May 2013 , 1:06am
post #5 of

Take you some calculator paper, wrap it around the sides of your cake till the two ends meet and cut it. Then take your paper and fold it evenly in half, then fold that half in half again evenly until you have it folded with how many times you want to do swags around the cake. Some people may fold it 6 or 8 times. Then draw an upside down line on top and cut it. You will end up cutting all 6 or 8 folded sides equally depending on how many times you folded it.  Then you can pin it on your cake once you are ready to pipe to use as a guide for going around the cake. I have seen some people just take toothpicks and mark their lines on top of their cut paper around cake then they pipe and follow the toothpick lines.

 

I guess everyone does it differently. This is my way. Maybe someone else here that is more experienced will have a better way to do it. Good luck/Mary

mcaulir Posted 19 May 2013 , 1:14am
post #6 of

I'm not explaining myself well, I don't think.

 

I'm using royal icing on fondant. I get how to make sure it's all spaced out evenly. I can pipe swags, because I can touch the icing to the cake, and when you pipe a line, it falls in a nice neat swag.

 

However, when I want to pipe the same curve, but with the curve pointing upwards, like a rainbow, rather than falling downwards, I'm having trouble getting the same neat, even line.

 

I'm wondering if there's a particular technique I'm missing, or if people are just piping the line and can do it more neatly than I can.

 

If people are just neater than me, it's fine and I'll practice some more.

kaylawaylalayla Posted 19 May 2013 , 1:55am
post #7 of

ATo me it looks traced. Mayne take a round cutter and indent a little and then trave that as steady as possible?

Elcee Posted 19 May 2013 , 3:05am
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcaulir 

I'm not explaining myself well, I don't think.

 

I'm using royal icing on fondant. I get how to make sure it's all spaced out evenly. I can pipe swags, because I can touch the icing to the cake, and when you pipe a line, it falls in a nice neat swag.

 

However, when I want to pipe the same curve, but with the curve pointing upwards, like a rainbow, rather than falling downwards, I'm having trouble getting the same neat, even line.

 

I'm wondering if there's a particular technique I'm missing, or if people are just piping the line and can do it more neatly than I can.

 

If people are just neater than me, it's fine and I'll practice some more.

I think it's done exactly as you described earlier, traditional stringwork with the tier flipped upside down.

cheatize Posted 19 May 2013 , 4:07am
post #9 of

Yep. I'd flip it upside down to do the string work. Not that I've ever done string work, though it just seems to me the best way to accomplish it.

mcaulir Posted 19 May 2013 , 5:24am

Thanks for your input, everyone. I'll flip it over and give it a go!

Relznik Posted 19 May 2013 , 8:40am

Perosnally, I don't think I'd be comfortable flipping a sugarpasted cake.  I'd be worried.  But that's just me.

 

I think a tilting turntable is an absolute must for piping something like this....  so that you can have it tilting away from you...

 

https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=tilting+turntable&client=firefox-a&hs=bb0&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=0o-YUe_REI3EPJvqgKgM&ved=0CAoQ_AUoAQ&biw=1680&bih=916

 

Good luck - very pretty cake!

 

Suzanne x
 

cazza1 Posted 19 May 2013 , 9:05am

mcaulir definitely tip your cake over.  Mark your cake with pinpricks for the start and end of each drop.  Don't try and follow the line but start with your tip at one pinprick and pull away slightly from the cake, squeezing until your length is right for the drop and reattach at the next pinprick.  Practice, practice, practice. If you are having trouble getting even drops you can make a mask out of baking paper with the drops cut into it and wrap it around your cake to use as a guide.

Relznik flipping fondant covered cakes is not a problem.  You just rub a bit or cornflour on the top, place a cardboard round over the top of your cake and then flip on to that.  If your cake is covered properly the fondant will stay put.

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