Cher2051 Posted 16 May 2013 , 12:52pm
post #1 of

I need some help as to what kind of doilies to use under my cakes. The ones that I am using tend to tear when the cake is being cut and makes a mess....any help would be appreciated. Thanks!

12 replies
Annabakescakes Posted 16 May 2013 , 1:00pm
post #2 of

AWhat is a cake doilie?

Cher2051 Posted 16 May 2013 , 1:43pm
post #3 of

Really? or are you being sarcastic :) 

leah_s Posted 16 May 2013 , 2:09pm
post #4 of

I haven't seen a doilie used under a cake in a decade or longer.  Because, you know, they tear and get paper into the cake and make a mess.

Annabakescakes Posted 16 May 2013 , 2:22pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cher2051 

Really? or are you being sarcastic :) 

Seriously, I have been doing cakes for 25 years and have never used a doilie under one. I did use a doilie on one once, to make a pattern with powdered sugar,(then took the doilie off)  but then the PS melted into the icing and just looked like a foggy scum pattern, so I won't ever do that again. 

 

I think I remember seeing a doilie under a cake in my 1979 Wilton year book, but I don't reference it that often, since it was the year I was born, I noticed cakes are done quite differently now.. ;-)

 

But I think you are safe to not use a doilie anymore. If you insist, maybe use it under your cake board, and not under the cake, itself.

 

BTW, what is the point?

Cher2051 Posted 16 May 2013 , 2:34pm
post #6 of

Well since it has been a long while since I have done cakes I was just wondering...so since no one uses doilies anymore what do you cover your cake boards with? Thank You!

Annabakescakes Posted 16 May 2013 , 2:40pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cher2051 

Well since it has been a long while since I have done cakes I was just wondering...so since no one uses doilies anymore what do you cover your cake boards with? Thank You!

Nothing.

 

I set the cake directly on the board, (same size as the cake) stuck with a little blob of icing. After icing, I put it on a larger board either covered in fondant, (stuck with white chocolate) or on a board covered in fanci-foil (stuck down with either double sided tape, or tape loops, or white chocolate, whichever is handiest)

 

Or, it is for home use, I use a dinner plate with no board, lol.

Mamasmanna Posted 16 May 2013 , 2:47pm
post #8 of

Cake drums covered in food-safe foil or fondant go under the base of the entire cake. Individual cake boards (grease-proof side up) go right under the cake (touching the cake itself). Some people make their own boards that hold the entire cake by cutting foam core boards or even gluing multiple cake boards together to make it sturdier. You can typically cover a board in fondant or foil. You can also google basic information on how to do this and where to buy these.

ellavanilla Posted 16 May 2013 , 3:29pm
post #9 of

I only use a cake drum if it's a heavy, tiered cake. otherwise I use a slightly larger board. i never use anything that will make the cake slide off the board. it's only cause for anxiety. 

lorieleann Posted 16 May 2013 , 5:29pm

Wilton (full lines available at Michaels or JoAnn crafts) now has some very cute presentation boards that are printed or finished with a food safe surface.  They also have just printed sheets to put on a cake board.  I used one that had a black and white damask pattern that looked nice with the theme of the cake I was doing.  While not ideal for a lot of commercial uses, they are great for the hobby baker to easily give some extra style to cake presentation.  http://www.wilton.com/store/site/department.cfm?id=3E305632-475A-BAC0-5B78578E30610AB8&fid=76ABA7C5-475A-BAC0-56868CD4CC3B55C5 

 

http://www.globalsugarart.com/doilies-c-869_876.html has some updated versions of the lacy doily.  Like others have mentioned, they really aren't used much except for a vintage design.  I won't say there isn't a place for them at all, but mostly cake presentation has moved away from the lacy doily look. 

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 16 May 2013 , 10:13pm

None. So far, either a dinner plate, if it's baked in a Bundt mold, or in-pan, if it's a sheet cake. Probably this year's Leland Awards cake will be depanned, mounted on a board, and boxed, but that assumes I have more time than I did for the first one.

Cher2051 Posted 16 May 2013 , 10:16pm

Thanks for the advice :)

megpi Posted 18 May 2013 , 6:37am

I like to just use parchment rounds that are the same size as the cake board the finished cake is on. They keep the board from getting oily but don't stand out.

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