girlisrad Posted 10 May 2013 , 3:47pm
post #1 of 19

This is my FAVORITE Whipped Cream Cheese icing recipe: 

 

16oz cream cheese, room temperature
1 1/2 cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup heavy cream, cold. Higher the fat content, the better (I'm using 40% Ultra)

 

*Mod edited to remove mixing instructions which is a possible copyright violation.

 

BUT< it is actually for cinnamon rolls, not necessarily a cake.  But my customer wants it on her full sheet this weekend. So my questions are:

 

1. Could I drop a tbsp or two of meringue powder to help it crust over a bit?

2. Would 1/2 cup or so of butter help smooth it out to be more spreadable?

3. How long can a whipped frosting like this stay out of a cooled enviroment?

 

Thanks in advance for your help!

18 replies
ddaigle Posted 10 May 2013 , 3:59pm
post #2 of 19

1.  Meringue powder does not create crust----Powdered sugar does. 

 

2.  Butter should help it spread more easily.

 

3.  Home made cream cheese should not set out.    "Cooled" environment is not enough...it needs refrigerated until serving.   I wouldn't let it set out for more than a couple hours. 

girlisrad Posted 10 May 2013 , 4:24pm
post #3 of 19

OK thanks.. 

 

What does the meringue powder do for the frosting then? Capt. Google Machine gives me about 500 different answers... so my ignorance is somewhat justified.

 

And yes, by cooled environment I meant refrigeration. Sorry for the (poor?) choice in words.

 

I am very new to this, so I apologize if I come off as stupid. Perhaps I am.

ddaigle Posted 10 May 2013 , 4:32pm
post #4 of 19

Your not stupid...there is a lot of different information on the internet.   It is not all wrong.

 

I'm  not sure what Meringue powder does to butter cream.   I think it is an unnecessary expense/step.  I only use it in my Royal Icing when making cookies.     You will see many people that think it crusts butter cream.   Your fat to sugar ratio is what you need to fix to make the butter cream crust.

 

Cream cheese icing can stay on a cake for days...if refrigerated. 

 

Hope this helps. 

girlisrad Posted 10 May 2013 , 9:17pm
post #5 of 19

It is helpful and I thank you. Sorry for being snarky. It is an intense amount of time and work to research good recipes, good advice, good ANYTHING. Contrary to most, I did not ask to be a weekend warrior... it just happened. My career as a "decorator" ended 3 weeks ago(by my own accord) and I have to date 10 cake orders since I left my position. I am in uncharted territory! I guess what I do is enough to make people want it... but I am truly just piecing this all together as I go. I have so little knowledge but if my community believes in me ? I will do all i can to deliver a good cake.  I don't know royal, gum, fondant, fillings, or flavors. I am the absolute rock bottom of decor. but I know where I am, and I know where I came from. My questions may seem juvenile but I assure you that I value this forum above anything. 

ddaigle Posted 11 May 2013 , 1:02pm
post #6 of 19

Keep gathering information from Cake Central and the internet.   There is tons of information available.    Only tackle what you are comfortable doing.   I took extreme baby steps because I was so cake intimidated.   There are so many helpful people here on cake central with different levels of experience....use them.   Most are extremely helpful.  The you tube videos are amazing also.  We were all noobs at one time.   

girlisrad Posted 13 May 2013 , 1:08pm
post #7 of 19

The cake (a full sheet graduation) was a success! The frosting turned out beautifully, although I did overmix the mast batch and had to use buttercream for my borders... the customer called me late last night and said everyone RAVED over her cake ;)  Most of them had been to 1-2 other grad parties that day with store bought cakes and I  guess they just fussed and fussed over hers!  Made my Mothers Day <3

 

Thanks again for your help. 

Krypto Posted 13 May 2013 , 10:52pm
post #8 of 19

Girlisrad, I use that same recipe and it is to die for! Try it on carrot cake. I'm glad your cake was a success. thumbs_up.gif

girlisrad Posted 13 May 2013 , 11:40pm
post #9 of 19

OHHH Carrot cake.... and Red Velvet!!  OH i am drooling now. 

 

And thank you so much  icon_biggrin.gif

dazzling20 Posted 16 May 2013 , 6:38pm
post #10 of 19

AMade this yesterday for red velvet, delicious!! Thanks for sharing!

girlisrad Posted 16 May 2013 , 9:08pm
post #11 of 19

Awesome! So glad you enjoyed it!!!  It is my husbands fav!  

spohls Posted 26 May 2013 , 3:27pm
post #12 of 19

I am wondering how this holds up as a filling? Thanks in advance!

girlisrad Posted 26 May 2013 , 5:17pm
post #13 of 19

AHolds up beautifully for me! Just be VERY careful not to over-whip or it will become runny... I usually barricade it in with a Buttercream border to be safe!

singleagain Posted 26 May 2013 , 6:36pm
post #14 of 19

AMeringue powder does help form a crust. I use it all the time

leah_s Posted 26 May 2013 , 6:59pm
post #15 of 19

Crust forms because of the fat to powdered sugar ratio.  Period.

becca3825 Posted 2 Jul 2013 , 2:57am
post #16 of 19

AMeringue powder does crust icing. That's why it is used.

lorieleann Posted 2 Jul 2013 , 4:29am
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by leah_s 

Crust forms because of the fat to powdered sugar ratio.  Period.

 

 

this.  

 

if there is any question as to meringue powder causing the crust, please make up two batches of ABC, with and without meringue power to test the theory.  To see what actually makes it crust, try the recipe with different ratios of powder sugar to fat.  You will see that the more powder sugar added to the whipped fat, the more crust will develop--regardless of the amount of meringue powder added. I never add meringue powder to my ABC and i have no problem with the surface crystalizing or crusting.  The (popular) SugarShack buttercream recipe is crusting and has no meringue. 

 

Now whether or not adding meringue powder to an already correct crusting ratio of fat to powder sugar ABC enhances the quality or texture of the crust, I don't know. But if you have a ratio of 2 cups of butter to one lb of powder sugar, no amount of meringue powder is going to make that crust.  

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 2 Jul 2013 , 4:38am
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by becca3825 

Meringue powder does crust icing. That's why it is used.


No, it is used because people keep telling people it aids crusting, and said people don't test it to see if it's true.

 

Not trying to be snarky, but that really is why people keep using it.
 

becca3825 Posted 9 Jul 2013 , 2:08am
post #19 of 19

AAdding meringue powder does aid in crusting. I've played with icing recipes for over 10 years. Maybe the fat ratio to sugar theory has truth to it, but I know if I don't add it to my recipes, I don't have crusting.

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