neanscreations Posted 9 May 2013 , 12:23am

A[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3002756/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

So I didn't know what kind of cake to make for her birthday and this is what I came up with. Technically this is my 3rd ever fondant cake and it took less time and I'm improving or at least I think so. However the top was a pain. Any tips on frosting a custom cut cake without tearing it up?

8 replies
manddi Posted 9 May 2013 , 1:17am

AIf you mean that your cake is tearing when you apply frosting, your buttercream is too thick. Thin it out a little with water, milk, cream, or corn syrup.

Cute cake; I bet your daughter loved it!

connie9003 Posted 9 May 2013 , 1:25am

Also I use a frosting tip on some cakes. it spreads a even layer of icing and gives you minimal workings.instead of smoothing all the icing you just smooth the lines.

neanscreations Posted 9 May 2013 , 1:32am

AYes it tore but what I did was I did not have a small enough square pan so I cut it down to size and when I applied frosting to the cake edges it was like trying to frost well the inside of a cake. I never thought of using a frosting tip to do it. Do you use one of those extra large tips? And thanks my daughter is in love with it!!

Cakemommy2012 Posted 9 May 2013 , 2:49am

They actually have a tip called the Icer Tip.  It is very large and has a large narrow slit so you can put a nice even layer on your cakes.  After I carve a cake, I usually press it to firm it back up then pop it in the freezer before I ice it! HTH

neanscreations Posted 9 May 2013 , 4:40am

AGood tip. But does the pressing it not squish it? And what is HTH?

Cakemommy2012 Posted 9 May 2013 , 5:19am

You just want to press the "loose" cake on the sides back into itself--not sure how to word that--  you want to make it not feel like icing the inside of a cake like you said-- =-)  HTH (Hope that Helps)

auntginn Posted 9 May 2013 , 5:46am

Are you talking about a crumb coat?  I put a crumb coat of thinned out icing on my cold cake first, wait til it crust and then ice the cake.

PTDixieGal Posted 11 May 2013 , 3:05am

AWESOME!

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%