candykayne Posted 3 May 2013 , 9:52pm
post #1 of

Hey all,

I am doing a simple ocean themed wedding cake at the end of the month. I want to make 3d white chocolate coral. I will have it going up the tiers from largest to smallest. I will pipe white chocolate onto this guide 

but I want it 3d so here is my question:

Once the flat coral is piped and hardened can I then pipe a few more small pieces of coral and stick those to the already cooled coral to make it 3d?

 

If anyone has any suggestions that would be lovely! 

Thank you

7 replies
IAmPamCakes Posted 3 May 2013 , 10:21pm
post #2 of

AThat would be how I would do it, I think. Start flat & build up. I once saw - years ago - Jaques Torres (sp?) make chocolate coral. He was making a huge centerpiece but it's something I've always remembered. He had a big acetate tube (I think) filled with ice chunks and poured melte chocolate into the tube. It set around the ice, & when the ice melted away there was chocolate coral left behind. It was pretty cool to see. Neat technique.

Stitches Posted 4 May 2013 , 1:21am
post #3 of

I made the coral like J. Torres did (I have several professional chocolate books and they show how) here's what mine looked like:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/66588888@N02/6290803028/in/set-72157628003317864/            http://www.flickr.com/photos/66588888@N02/6218237751/in/set-72157627742543253   my photos aren't great but you can see several examples of the coral on my cakes in the photo. If you hit next while in Flickr the next photo shows the same thing from another angle.

 

The thing about that technique is my coral turned out short and stumpy. It was hard to get the coral to look like Mr.Torres example (he is called Mr. Chocolate, for a reason....he's brilliant!)

 

I also made coral as the OP first described.....that definitely works better for a cake application. You could do a much better job then I did http://www.flickr.com/photos/66588888@N02/6205047925/in/set-72157627795287898

 

It's not hard to do....it's actually pretty fun.

candykayne Posted 15 May 2013 , 9:26pm
post #4 of

Wow that does sound very cool! I may just have to give that a try. This weekend is my test run. Thank you!

candykayne Posted 15 May 2013 , 9:34pm
post #5 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stitches 

I made the coral like J. Torres did (I have several professional chocolate books and they show how) here's what mine looked like:  http://www.flickr.com/photos/66588888@N02/6290803028/in/set-72157628003317864/            http://www.flickr.com/photos/66588888@N02/6218237751/in/set-72157627742543253   my photos aren't great but you can see several examples of the coral on my cakes in the photo. If you hit next while in Flickr the next photo shows the same thing from another angle.

 

The thing about that technique is my coral turned out short and stumpy. It was hard to get the coral to look like Mr.Torres example (he is called Mr. Chocolate, for a reason....he's brilliant!)

 

I also made coral as the OP first described.....that definitely works better for a cake application. You could do a much better job then I did http://www.flickr.com/photos/66588888@N02/6205047925/in/set-72157627795287898

 

It's not hard to do....it's actually pretty fun.

Thank you so much for sharing your advice and photos! Your dessert tables look amazing and I am inspired to make a lovely coral cake :) I will share photos when I am done! Thanks again!

Stitches Posted 15 May 2013 , 11:45pm
post #6 of

I look forward to seeing your cake!

candykayne Posted 26 May 2013 , 3:03pm
post #7 of

AI wasn't Able to do it 3D like I was hoping to but I still was very happy with it. Next time I will definitely try the ice method. Thanks for the tips :)[IMG]http://cakecentral.com/content/type/61/id/3017933/width/200/height/400[/IMG]

IAmPamCakes Posted 26 May 2013 , 3:05pm
post #8 of

AVery pretty.

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