Bride Wants To Discuss The Contract In Person...

Business By Pebbles1727 Updated 25 Apr 2013 , 7:25pm by HannahsMomi

Pebbles1727 Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 4:18am
post #1 of 9

Got a quick question for you. I have a bride who actually wants to schedule another appointment to discuss the contract in person.  It is a little unusual for me, not the questions about it, just doing it in person.  It has been drafted by an attorney and I have quite a few attorney brides over the years who reviewed and signed without a single question, so I'm not worried about the contract itself.  I have already answered some questions in regards to it, so I'm not certain what I need to be prepared for?  Any advise from those who have experience in this area?  Thanks, P

8 replies
cakefat Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 5:02am
post #2 of 9

my advice is to ask the bride (via email) to please email you the topics/items that she would like to discuss before meeting in person...cause you're busy. And that your contracts are usually set. 

kazita Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 5:44am
post #3 of 9

A

Original message sent by cakefat

my advice is to ask the bride (via email) to please email you the topics/items that she would like to discuss before meeting in person...cause you're busy. And that your contracts are usually set. 

Good advice. It does sound like the bride might want something in your contract changed.

Pebbles1727 Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 6:14am
post #4 of 9

Ok, thanks. Based on the questions she has asked so far, everything had to do with my liability and refunds, specifically in case of "acts of God" situations and damage during delivery/set up/after set up.

I thought it was something different since I already answered those. 

Thanks again, P

kazita Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 6:26am
post #5 of 9

AMake sure to take pictures of the cake after its set up so the bride can't come back and say something was wrong with the cake.

sixinarow Posted 25 Apr 2013 , 3:31am
post #6 of 9

Something my father (an attorney) always told me...if someone puts you on the spot and wants an answer from you immediately, your answer should be "no".

The reasoning, they want you to rely on the emotions of the situation (like a used car dealer or salesperson saying the sale won't last, you might miss out on a good deal, you may lose a sale) instead of thinking through the possible consequences.

I don't know what she could be wanting to talk to you about and it may be nothing, but in the middle of the conversation, if she is trying to get you to change something or add something in -- remember -- you are allowed to tell her that you need to check with your attorney before you change anything in the contract. That way, YOU have time to think about any amendments that she may want to make. If she scoffs, walk away!!

Sorry if this is completely unneeded advice, I've just had contract law drilled into me since I was knee high to a grasshopper! icon_smile.gif

cakefat Posted 25 Apr 2013 , 8:42am
post #7 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by sixinarow 

Something my father (an attorney) always told me...if someone puts you on the spot and wants an answer from you immediately, your answer should be "no".

The reasoning, they want you to rely on the emotions of the situation (like a used car dealer or salesperson saying the sale won't last, you might miss out on a good deal, you may lose a sale) instead of thinking through the possible consequences.

I don't know what she could be wanting to talk to you about and it may be nothing, but in the middle of the conversation, if she is trying to get you to change something or add something in -- remember -- you are allowed to tell her that you need to check with your attorney before you change anything in the contract. That way, YOU have time to think about any amendments that she may want to make. If she scoffs, walk away!!

Sorry if this is completely unneeded advice, I've just had contract law drilled into me since I was knee high to a grasshopper! icon_smile.gif

 

I think this is a great reminder and advice. something we should all remember with anything in life.

Thank you!

costumeczar Posted 25 Apr 2013 , 7:11pm
post #8 of 9

Ai totally agree...if it's something about the cake design, there's something to discuss. If she wants you to change the wording in or contract them there's nothing to discuss.

HannahsMomi Posted 25 Apr 2013 , 7:25pm
post #9 of 9

Sounds like a bride who may be a problem later....during and after the cake is made...

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