GlykaBakeShop Posted 17 Apr 2013 , 9:00pm
post #1 of

I've made ricotta filling for cakes a couple times before and went ahead and tried my hand at it again today. I used this recipe http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/my-country-my-kitchen/sicilian-cassata-ricotta-cake-recipe/index.html  and the filling turned out nice and thick and it tastes great, BUT I could not get rid of that "grainy" texture that ricotta cheese has. I beat the ricotta for 15 minutes but it still turned out grainy. And this is what's happened every other time I've tried making this filling. 

Any suggestions? Should I be beating the filling for much longer than 15 mins? 

 

5 replies
nanachele Posted 17 Apr 2013 , 9:05pm
post #2 of

Try using a ricotta from a deli or a store that sells Italian cheeses I use Caputo Ricotta Red and never have a grainey problem. good luck. 

theresaf Posted 17 Apr 2013 , 10:34pm
post #3 of

I never made this cake but I have made cannoli cream, lasagna and ravioli (Can you tell I'm Italian!)  Anyway I only use Polly-O brand.  Full fat. If you're going to make these kinds of desserts you don't go SKIM!  I don't like store brands or other brands (especially Sorrento) even if they are half the price!  I don't get a grainy texture in my results so maybe it is the brand you use.  Good luck!

Theresa

GlykaBakeShop Posted 17 Apr 2013 , 10:50pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by theresaf 

I never made this cake but I have made cannoli cream, lasagna and ravioli (Can you tell I'm Italian!)  Anyway I only use Polly-O brand.  Full fat. If you're going to make these kinds of desserts you don't go SKIM!  I don't like store brands or other brands (especially Sorrento) even if they are half the price!  I don't get a grainy texture in my results so maybe it is the brand you use.  Good luck!

Theresa

I will admit I used Sorrento! But it was full fat. And like I said, the filling is nice and thick but has a slight graininess, if you will. I guess I should spend the extra $$ and buy the good stuff from the local Italian delis (there are so many in my area) :)

AnnieCahill Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 1:58am
post #5 of

Most ricotta is going to be grainy.  That's the nature of the beast.  Beating it is just going to move the curds around.  You should run it through a blender or food processor and then push it through a strainer to reduce the graininess.  You also might want to strain it through a cheesecloth for 24 hours if you want something thicker.  Most of us can't get impastata ricotta, which is thicker and used to fill cannolis.

theresaf Posted 18 Apr 2013 , 4:48pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by GlykaBakeShop 

I will admit I used Sorrento! But it was full fat. And like I said, the filling is nice and thick but has a slight graininess, if you will. I guess I should spend the extra $$ and buy the good stuff from the local Italian delis (there are so many in my area) :)

 

Oh that Sorrento!  That made me laugh only because the few times I bought that brand I regretted it.  Good luck with the next batch!  Keep us posted!

Theresa

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