'stick' Of Butter

Baking By lego Updated 11 Apr 2013 , 2:41am by milkmaid42

lego Posted 10 Apr 2013 , 6:05pm
post #1 of 6

I watch a lot of American baking programs but I am British and they always say a 'stick' of butter and I was wondering how much in grams did one stick weigh.

 

thanks 

5 replies
denetteb Posted 10 Apr 2013 , 6:09pm
post #2 of 6

A stick of butter is 1/2 cup or 1/4 pound.  Don't have a conversion chart handy to do the next step but that should get you farther.

milkmaid42 Posted 10 Apr 2013 , 6:16pm
post #3 of 6

Our American butter comes in 1 lb. (16 oz = 454 g.) boxes, each containing 4 individually wrapped portions. Each "stick" is 4 oz, or 113.5 g.

 

I really feel silly answering this question, for I am one of those frightened to use metrics in the many UK or Australian recipes I would love to make. Fortunately for me, this info I'm reading right off the box. icon_biggrin.gif

 

Kudos to you for what I don't dare.

 

Jan

 

Two years ago I purchased a pricey metric food scale which sits still wrapped on my shelf!

Spireite Posted 10 Apr 2013 , 6:28pm
post #4 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by milkmaid42 

I really feel silly answering this question, for I am one of those frightened to use metrics in the many UK or Australian recipes I would love to make. Fortunately for me, this info I'm reading right off the box. icon_biggrin.gif

 

Kudos to you for what I don't dare.

 

Jan

 

Two years ago I purchased a pricey metric food scale which sits still wrapped on my shelf!

Hi Milkmaid...I am a  37 year old Brit, and was educated in a totally metric schools system.  However I know my weight and height in imperial and always cook/bake in imperial...not to mention guestimating mileage...

I work in the NHS; so that is all metric, and although we weigh the newborn babies in grams... 95% of parents want it converting to lbs and ozs. 

It is law now in the UK to sell things in metric (European regulations), but a lot of Brits find the metric conversions difficult...icon_cool.gif

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 10 Apr 2013 , 9:56pm
post #5 of 6

I had a year of junior high physical science, a year of high school physical science, a year of junior high chemistry, a year of high school chemistry, a semester of university chemistry, a year of high school physics, and TWO years of university physics (because of a change of major, I had to take calculus general physics after I'd already taken non-calc general physics), and a semester of university astronomy. So the Metric System is an old friend. (Incidentally, whenever you talk about volts, amperes, and watts, you're using Metric units.)

 

Most of my measuring cups are dual-calibrated. So is my food scale.

 

Working in either set of units is easy. It's converting back and forth that's the pain in the butt.

milkmaid42 Posted 11 Apr 2013 , 2:41am
post #6 of 6

Like you, hbq, I've worked with metrics, believe it or not. I was a zoology major in college and had the physics, math, chemistry, and so on. I didn't find it difficult as long as I didn't have to make conversions between the two. The difficulty I have now, when trying to make the delicious sounding recipes some of my Aussie and German fellow CCrs share with me is my confusion between volume and weight when making conversions. I am so used to just using cups and measuring spoons. (Not to mention that Aus. measurements differ slightly from UK.) And my conversions never round out to a nice even number when using the many conversion charts I find on-line. So I can appreciate those who aren't challenged like I appear to be. The only thing I am comfortable with are 2 liter soda bottles! icon_biggrin.gif    Perhaps one of these days I'll unwrap my beautiful new scale and give it a try. thumbs_up.gif

 

Jan

Quote by @%username% on %date%

%body%