sfandm Posted 27 Mar 2013 , 1:26pm
post #1 of

AIwas in New Mexico, and now in North Dakota. I am not sure how to adjust my recipes for the difference in humidity between the two states. Is there a site I can go to for the answers or can someone help me here??? Thanks

7 replies
-K8memphis Posted 27 Mar 2013 , 1:39pm
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i think the best idea is to bake a small cake every few days--a half or quarter recipe and then see what kind of differences you experience then ask about the differences--

 

measure it out and only mix part of it or something--so later you just combine wet & dry--

 

i'd say in general that a more humid climate is easier to bake in --

 

i baked in a dessert climate before but i most often bake in a more humid climate--there was not a big difference to me--

 

high altitude would throw me a curve i'm sure but i've never baked in a high alt.

 

have you experienced anything especially different? or just spying out the land in advance?

sfandm Posted 27 Mar 2013 , 4:46pm
post #3 of

I have actually lived here for more than a year now, elevation is around 2500, and we have alot of snow in the winter months, but it is never humid like New Mexico was, and the elevation was in most places 4700 to 9000', and I baked there for almost 8 years on and off. I have had several customers tell me that my sheet cakes were a little dry.

 

I always take them out of the pan 10 minutes after the oven, then I place them on parchment on a cooling rack, and place the entire thing in a covered half sheet pan, and refrigerate till cool. Then I frost it, and decorate.

 

I can't imagine the cake drying out in the fridge or the covered sheet pan, this has the plastic dome lid that fits around the whole thing, so the only air in it is what I enclose.

 

I am wandering if I should just start wrapping the cake in plastic wrap 10 minutes after taking out of the pan.

 

BTW- my cupcakes, cookies, pies, brownies are always moist, no complaints from those categories. And, most of the recipes I am using are from scratch that I got off the CC forum, just a few from books or passed down.

-K8memphis Posted 27 Mar 2013 , 5:20pm
post #4 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfandm 

 

I can't imagine the cake drying out in the fridge or the covered sheet pan, this has the plastic dome lid that fits around the whole thing, so the only air in it is what I enclose.

 

 

refrigeration does dry cake -- i mean if it's all encased in icing that helps but it definitely stales out baked goods--freezing basically suspends the staling

 

if i put a cake in the fridge i would double wrap it in plastic wrap--i would not trust that type of pan & lid myself--if i did keep it in the pan i would encase that in plastic wrap--to keep fridge smells out too--but i bake to order and freeze my uniced cakes

 

also to me cakes made with butter could be considered 'dry' after being chilled even when they come back to room temp--but literally they are not dry it's just that the butter seems to stay a teeny bit more firm when it returns to room temperature--so when it goes down the throat it is more firm going down so it translates to 'dry'

 

when i microwave the uniced cake it perfectly returns to the soft fluffy goes-down-easy cake it was before being chilled--just my observations on that

 

but refrigeration does definitely dry out cake

sfandm Posted 29 Mar 2013 , 8:10pm
post #5 of

Oh my goodnes k8, I never knew that about butter, and this is all I use in my scratch recipes. I only do scratch, and I have been making the same chocolate cake recipe for years now. I sold one to my postal lady the other day, and asked her to rate it for me, she said it was "delicious, but a little dry".

 

I will do exactly what you said about double wrapping, as I bake to order also. I will stop putting my sheet cakes into the pan, and will start using your method.

 

 

Thanks again for all your help, BTW, I love the cake you are decorating in your avatar. You do awesome work.

 

Have a GREAT Easter!!!!

sweetroses65 Posted 29 Mar 2013 , 8:28pm
post #6 of

I let the cakes cool in the pans and then take them out. I think you are too committed to the 10 minutes. Second , do not cool your cakes on parchment paper. That will surely such out the moisture.Cool them strictly on the cooling rack.

 

As far as butter is concerned, the butter will harden in the cake when the cake is chilled. If you bring the cake to room temperature, which could take a good 2 hours, the cake will return to the original consistency. You might want to try a chiffon cake which uses oil , then you won't have any consistency problems.

-K8memphis Posted 29 Mar 2013 , 9:04pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by sfandm 

Oh my goodnes k8, I never knew that about butter, and this is all I use in my scratch recipes. I only do scratch, and I have been making the same chocolate cake recipe for years now. I sold one to my postal lady the other day, and asked her to rate it for me, she said it was "delicious, but a little dry".

 

I will do exactly what you said about double wrapping, as I bake to order also. I will stop putting my sheet cakes into the pan, and will start using your method.

 

 

Thanks again for all your help, BTW, I love the cake you are decorating in your avatar. You do awesome work.

 

Have a GREAT Easter!!!!

 

 

well go ahead make my friday!!! thank you so much!!

 

yeah --that is just my observation about scratch butter cakes--they are no where near dry but if we get that throat feel--we say it's dry and i mean 7 seconds in the microwave and it's like new is what i determined pour moi

 

and a very lovely easter to you too!!!

-K8memphis Posted 29 Mar 2013 , 9:18pm
post #8 of

and do you ever use a splash? a simple syrup plus flavoring??

 

it helps with more moisture

 

also fwiw-- i use those reynolds baking bags (like for turkeys & roasts) to slide the double wrapped cakes into too--to put in the freezer & i re-use them

 

i wrap them up like mummies ;)

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