Bakery And Fondant

Business By pduncan326 Updated 25 Mar 2013 , 4:54pm by MKBeck27

pduncan326 Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 10:58am
post #1 of 10

  My daughter-in-law and I are in the planning stages of opening our bakery and I am wondering.  Do any of you NOT do fondant in your bakery? How well would we do if we do not fool with fondant. Fondant taste so badly and I would want to be know for taste as well as the looks. 

9 replies
Norasmom Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 11:46am
post #2 of 10

The storefront bakery in my town doesn't use fondant, and her cake business does very well!  She doesn't do weddings, however.

justme50 Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 12:03pm
post #3 of 10

The most successful bakery in this town proudly does not do fondant. They even advertise on their website that they refuse to use it.  If you're good at what you do, you don't have to offer it.
 

Bluehue Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 12:35pm
post #4 of 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by pduncan326 

  My daughter-in-law and I are in the planning stages of opening our bakery and I am wondering.  Do any of you NOT do fondant in your bakery? How well would we do if we do not fool with fondant. Fondant taste so badly and I would want to be know for taste as well as the looks. 

 

But then on the other hand - what if you had a modern Bride who wanted Fondant?

Would you turn that order away?

Or if you had an order for a certain design - with a huge fondant bow....would you use it then?

Just food for thought.....

 

I think the phrase *if your good at what you do - you dont have to offer it* is a long stretch.

There are many famous cakers who offer both Buttercream and fondant.

 

Perhaps after you have tasted every Fondant there is to offer - you just might be surprised at how nice some are - not only in taste - but to work with.

 

Not sure where in the World you are - but here in Australia - 80% of todays modern Bride wouldn't think of having Buttercream.... i accept that trends go in cycles..... and because of this, perhaps you could have it  on hand just incase.................. unless of course - you just refuse to work with it.

 

Bluehue

NJsugarmama Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 1:08pm
post #5 of 10

AThere is a bakery in Cali called Enjoy Cupcakes. She does buttercream strickly for her cakes and cupcakes using natural flavors and coloring from fresh ingredients.

The simplicity of her products makes them beautiful. If I were to do the whole cake/dessert business over again...I'd follow her lead.

As for the taste of fondant, I think we can all agree that it has come a long way and there are many good options out there.

Many people see fabulous cakes on cake shows and they see a lot of possibilities with what can be created. If you decide to stay away from it, you may limit your customer base.

It really comes down to what you are comfortable working with.

-K8memphis Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 2:26pm
post #6 of 10

having a niche in this industry is just about a given--almost no way around it

 

but there's a way to stay open and fresh and still learning even as you cater to your market

 

i would not recommend to anyone to ever say never

 

why box yourself in--use your niche to your advantage but stay open and learn

 

at the least don't put others down for different techniques & styles & sizes--not that anyone here is

 

what if say the senator in your state was having his/her 50th wedding anniversary and their staff contacted you to do a re-make of their original wedding cake with stairs & satellites, piped roses, lily of the valley etc. -- would you have to say--'oh sorry i'm booked' -- talk about bragging rights down the tubes or ad infinitum?

 

or what if someone wanted a japanese string cake or an art deco square sleek & smooth or a fire breathing dragon or a hummer or a pulled & blown sugar  or chocolate curls covered in lace

 

while we can't all specialize in all of that--we should be able to do it or be working toward it eventually--should be on the list imo

kikiandkyle Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 2:43pm
post #7 of 10

I would say try out some of the many fondants on offer before deciding it tastes bad. Only you know what tastes are like in your area, but the whole 'fondant is gross' thing is slowly disappearing from the common thinking. 

Paperfishies Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 3:42pm
post #8 of 10

This.  I find that people who are all "fondant is disgusting" have only had the nasty Wilton fondant.

 

there are fondants out there that taste wonderful and will not have a negative impact on the flavor of your cakes, Op.

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by kikiandkyle 

I would say try out some of the many fondants on offer before deciding it tastes bad. Only you know what tastes are like in your area, but the whole 'fondant is gross' thing is slowly disappearing from the common thinking. 

jason_kraft Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 4:01pm
post #9 of 10

AMany people end up picking the fondant off anyway and are aware that it's more for decoration than taste. But if you have other competitive advantages that outweigh not using fondant, then go for it.

MKBeck27 Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 4:54pm
post #10 of 10

I'm new here and am just deciding about trying out fondant. I'm a naturalist when it comes to my food, and as a vegetarian, have never tried most fondants because I don't know how to inquire if it's made with gelatin. I'm going to try using Fluff to make fondant to use for figures and decorations.

 

I was scouring a local bakery's website and she avoids using fondant as a cake covering, but does use it for decoration OR in a few certain circumstances. She said that deeply colored buttercream in red or black tends to turn people's teeth that color while they eat, so for those two colors she does use fondant. She encourages you to look at all her buttercream covered cakes (that look just like fondant covered) and says that that is how she does all her cakes, minus the exceptions. She doesn't outright say "I won't do fondant" but she makes the customer feel like she's trying to give them the best product she can.

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