Glitterkitti Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 8:06pm
post #1 of

I wanted to try the "push down' method where you push down on the top of a freshly baked cake to level it. I then froze the cakes and now when i defrosted it, it's really hard and dense. is it from the pushing down? has anyone else had this happen?

26 replies
ibeeflower Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 8:48pm
post #2 of

I don't know about the hardness, but pushing down on the cake will make it denser. After all, where is it the uneven part supposed to go? Maybe someone can give you advice on the hardness.

Serena4016 Posted 21 Mar 2013 , 11:48pm
post #3 of

I too, had tried the "push down"method and yes it DID make the cake more dense. I stopped doing it and am back to leveling the cakes.

justme50 Posted 22 Mar 2013 , 12:19am
post #4 of

I've never understood the idea of pushing down on a cake to level it. It has to change the density and texture.
 

costumeczar Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 12:04am
post #5 of

I always wondered why the #$*& someone would push down the top of a cake. That's like mashing a marshmallow down, it would just compress it.

cazza1 Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 1:06am
post #6 of

It does not make any sense to me either.  If the cake still takes up the same width but less height then you must be expelling the air out of your cake and their goes your lightness.  Level.  Then save your scraps (if you don't want to eat them on the spot) and make cake pops or something with them.

Gerle Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 3:33am
post #7 of

I read a suggestion on here a while back about putting something on top of the cake after you tort and fill the cake (wrapped in saran wrap, of course) to help level the cake and to make sure there would be no bulges.  Can't remember who made the suggestion but there was a whole thread about it.  Does that fall into this same category?  I don't remember tasting or noticing any difference in the cake, but maybe that was just me.  You don't put a really heavy tile or whatever on the cake, but something is placed on top of it.

costumeczar Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 4:03am
post #8 of

Many suggestions on here are not valid. It's like the commercial with the girl and her french model boyfriend...they can't put anything that isn't true on the internet...bon joor!

Sammy09 Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 4:37am
post #9 of

AKara, how do you prevent the cake bulge? TIA

yortma Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 4:41am

ADensity is mass/volume. If you have the same mass (weight) and smash it down to a smaller volume you will increase the density. Simple physics! After years of testing to find those perfectly tasty and light textured recipes you certainly won't catch me mashing down my cakes. That's why some awesome person created the Agbay. The tile weight is for filled cooled cakes. The idea is to apply a weight equal to the anticipated weight of the fondant to let the filling settle and do its squishing out before putting the fondant on. It's to prevent those unsightly fondant bulges. At least that's my take on it!

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costumeczar Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 10:10am
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy09 

Kara, how do you prevent the cake bulge? TIA

You mean the dome on the top of the cake? Lower baking temp usually works for that, but if you level it it doesn't matter if the Statue of Liberty grows out of it while it's baking, you can just cut it off. 

yortma Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 10:32am
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

You mean the dome on the top of the cake? Lower baking temp usually works for that, but if you level it it doesn't matter if the Statue of Liberty grows out of it while it's baking, you can just cut it off. 

Exactly!  Plus, no dome = no snacks!!

Bluehue Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 12:47pm
Quote:

Originally Posted by Gerle 

 

One would never do this to a Sponge cake of course.

I read a suggestion on here a while back about putting something on top of the cake after you tort and fill the cake (wrapped in saran wrap, of course) to help level the cake and to make sure there would be no bulges.

Yes this is correct... we have been doing it for years with our Mud Cakes...BUT you never ever wrap it them in glad wrap after you have torted and filled the layers... that would defeat the purpose. icon_rolleyes.gif.

Can't remember who made the suggestion but there was a whole thread about it. Most cakers who bake mud cakes do this....  but at the end of the day - each to their own.

 Does that fall into this same category?  No, how could it - sqishing down a warm cake and levelling out a cold filled and torted cake is completely different.

I don't remember tasting or noticing any difference in the cake, but maybe that was just me.  Agree...I haven't  noticed any difference in the taste of a cake after levelling it out with a tile.... You don't put a really heavy tile or whatever on the cake, but something is placed on top of it. Yes, you place a heavy Tile on the top of the cake.... Ceramic tiles are heavy... otherwise there would be no point in doing it.

Many have never tried baking a proper Mud cake - let alone placing a tile on top to level and expel the excess air.....

I would never do this to a Victoria Sponge or Carrot Cake...but for Mud Cakes...most certainly.

Bluehue

ctshappy Posted 23 Mar 2013 , 2:28pm

Does making it dense make it stay together better when slicing and serving?

Bluehue Posted 24 Mar 2013 , 7:01am
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctshappy 

Does making it dense make it stay together better when slicing and serving?

A dense cake is usually easier to cut = no crumbling.

Another good thing about a Mud Cake, they are always moist.

Bluehue

ibeeflower Posted 24 Mar 2013 , 10:05pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluehue 

A dense cake is usually easier to cut = no crumbling.

Another good thing about a Mud Cake, they are always moist.

Bluehue

Yummm...I made my first mud cake a couple a weeks ago. It was so delicious. Sorry to get off topic guys. :) I just wish I had some mud cake right now.

Bluehue Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 5:58pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ibeeflower 

Yummm...I made my first mud cake a couple a weeks ago. It was so delicious. Sorry to get off topic guys. :) I just wish I had some mud cake right now.

lolll thumbs_up.gif

TheDutchess41 Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 9:39pm

The push down method does not make your cakes dense. I use the push down method with my cakes straight from the oven only when my cakes have a belly,etc.  I too freeze my cakes from time to time and never have a problem. You first must allow your cake to cool before freezing and also to prevent your cake from getting hard or dry you must also wrap cake with plastic wrap or saran wrap.  To thaw the cake leave the cake wrapped in the plastic do not remove until cake is thawed this will keep the mositure in. 

dawnybird Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 10:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by costumeczar 

Many suggestions on here are not valid. It's like the commercial with the girl and her french model boyfriend...they can't put anything that isn't true on the internet...bon joor!


hahahahahahaha! I love that commercial!!

dawnybird Posted 25 Mar 2013 , 10:53pm

Actually, my Wilton instructor told us to gently push on the surface when the cake first comes out of the oven, only for a slight bulge, not to squish down a giant dome! I don't make tons of cakes, but people always tell me my cakes are yummy. So I guess I haven't made them too dense and hard!
 

ctshappy Posted 26 Mar 2013 , 12:25am

AThank you all. I'm baking tomorrow so I will keep it all in mind.

Smckinney07 Posted 26 Mar 2013 , 12:52am

ADome aside. To prevent bulging I tort and fill my cakes, then either wrap them & place in the fridge or leave them out covered with a cake circle, and let them rest overnight. Sometimes I add a magazine if I need to speed up the process, this allows the cakes to settle which prevents bulging. I learned this from Melissa and BeBe from 'My Cake School' awesome tips and tutorials, videos and message boards for $30/year!

Bluehue Posted 26 Mar 2013 , 5:09pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by ctshappy 

Thank you all. I'm baking tomorrow so I will keep it all in mind

If you get a slight rise in the middle of the cake - press down on it - honestly, its not going to make the cake dense - or alter the taste or texture.

People all around the world have been doing it for 100's of years.....

Just because its a new thing for some - doesnt mean its wrong or dangerous or stupid...

You will probably find most have never done it but speak as experts.... they just prefer to slice off the top of the cake.... each to their own - there is no right - no wrong.

 

Bluehue

waggs Posted 26 Mar 2013 , 5:32pm

My Wilton instructor also said to push down lightly on the Cale as soo as it comes out of the oven.  All my cakes are not dense.  

Bluehue Posted 28 Mar 2013 , 12:31pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by waggs 

My Wilton instructor also said to push down lightly on the Cale as soo as it comes out of the oven.  All my cakes are not dense.  

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