Do Not Buy Wedding Cakes From Wal-Mart Please Dont Ruin That Special Occasion!!!!

Decorating By ruinedthemoment Updated 22 Apr 2013 , 6:21pm by Carrie789

kazita Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 1:57am
post #92 of 112

AYou are way under paid HELLOsamii

DeliciousDesserts Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 2:06am
post #93 of 112

This:

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by justme50 

 

The real problem for with WalMart for me and many others I suspect, are the low prices and the expectations of customers that they can get those kinds of prices for a custom cake. Most likely, that's the bitterness you're tasting rather than the cake itself.

 

 

 

And This: 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by justme50 

 there's a market for low priced cakes. Not everyone can afford $200 birthday cakes. I just wish they'd buy them at their local grocer and understand that a custom, fresh baked cake can't be bought for $15.

 

 

We all understand that not everyone can afford a large custom cake.  Not everyone can afford Vera Wang!  However, I don't expect to buy a Vera Wang at Walmart.

 

I hate that some brides really are disappointed when expectations crash with the reality of what they get.  It also breaks my heart when they think they can get one of my custom cakes for Walmart prices.

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 4:39am
post #94 of 112

Regarding hot dogs, (which I do eat, but I'm picky about them), I think Steve Martin put it best, when he declared that he happens to love the taste of animal lips.

jason_kraft Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 5:32am
post #95 of 112

A

Original message sent by hbquikcomjamesl

Regarding hot dogs, (which I do eat, but I'm picky about them), I think Steve Martin put it best, when he declared that he happens to love the taste of animal lips.

Also, just because Walmart carries a product doesn't automatically mean it's low quality...after all, they sell Hebrew National hot dogs.

jason_kraft Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 5:34am
post #96 of 112

A

Original message sent by taartenmaker

I am sure y'all who are making fun off the Walmart cakes see them as a big concurrention.

I'm trying to figure out what this word was supposed to be. Competition? Conversation? Concurrent ion?

kazita Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 6:01am
post #97 of 112

A

Original message sent by jason_kraft

I'm trying to figure out what this word was supposed to be. Competition? Conversation? Concurrent ion?

Yeah it threw me way off too. Let me know if you figure it out.

kikiandkyle Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 6:08am
post #98 of 112

AThe Dutch word 'concurrentie' means competition in the business sense in Dutch, I often see concurrention being mistakenly used by Dutch speakers who are speaking in English. A lot of Dutch words become English words using the same change so its easy to understand how it happens.

kazita Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 6:27am
post #99 of 112

A

Original message sent by kikiandkyle

The Dutch word 'concurrentie' means competition in the business sense in Dutch, I often see concurrention being mistakenly used by Dutch speakers who are speaking in English. A lot of Dutch words become English words using the same change so its easy to understand how it happens.

Ok got ya. Thanks so much for clearing that up.

embersmom Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 1:33pm
post #100 of 112

I've been following this thread, unsure of what to say.  I know somewhere upthread somebody mentioned that nobody should be taking what's said in this thread personally and it's the execution vs. price that's really being discussed here.  And that's fine.  OTOH, as somebody who earned their decorator chops working at supermarket bakeries, I can't help but feel a but put off by what I'm interpreting as snottiness that's throughout this thread.

 

Especially in this economic climate, people are going to try to get what they want for the lowest price they can.  Therefore, they're going to hit either a supermarket or a place like Costco (which, btw, has pretty good cake IMO) first, then maybe a retail bakery, then maybe an independent caker, depending on their budget.

 

Does the fact that some of these people who once could afford a $200 custom cake and no longer can and therefore are turning to less expensive means fueling what I'm interpreting as snottiness?

 

 

 

Disclaimer:  Maybe people aren't trying to be or don't think they're being what I'm interpreting as snotty, but that's how it's coming across.  I know I can ignore this thread, but nobody learns anything if people are mostly kvetching in the thread like this.  Just a thought :)

HELLOsamii Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 2:18pm
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AThank you, very much for saying how I feel. :)

denetteb Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 2:39pm
post #102 of 112

I think what is most upsetting to custom bakers is not that there are budget minded buyers.  There will always be the vast majority of buyers that are quite content to pick up their kids birthday sheet cake at the grocery store.  But there are so many people that have a low budget that are contacting custom bakers that are way out of their price range and also asking for tiers and details and custom figures, etc.  Then trying to nickel and dime and bargain on the price, even when they have their prices posted on the website.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 2:44pm
post #103 of 112

AThe truth is anyone can be offended by anything. Yes, there are many grocery store decorators who have lots of talent. No, they are not all the same. Yes, taking a few digs & poking a bit if fun can be interpreted as being snotty or snobby.

I fully recognize the need for inexpensive cake. I also recognize that in order to create an inexpensive cake, costs have to be monitored. That means inexpensive ingredients and inexpensive labor. I am glad that people who can not afford an expensive custom cake have an option.

What I, and I imagine others, find frustrating are the many people who either: 1: expect the same quality from those cakes made with inexpensive ingredients & labor 2: expect the same cost for a cake made with more expensive ingredients & labor

This point becomes even more frustrating when the same customers recognize the value am difference in other items such as the venue, the caterer, the dress, etc.

This thread started as a warning from someone who was dissapointed in what they received versus expected. It did become a bit of a place to blow of some steam. I think everyone here truly has respect for each member of this forum regardless of skill level or occupation.

What exactly is it you think we should learn?

wild4wallace Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 5:07pm
post #104 of 112

So, to sum this all up, we all have our opinions, (yes, even me), we all have different tastes, different budgets, and a wide range of sense of humor.  Whether or not we purchase our cakes at the Wal*Mart or not, or if we believe they are moist and taste good, or not, what matters is that this disgruntled bride got her say in and disrupted a site where most of us have come to rely on for support from out peers and as a learning tool to help better ourselves  in our craft and art of creating amazing cakes and confections. 

 

I'm just saying. 

jason_kraft Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 7:31pm
post #105 of 112

A

Original message sent by wild4wallace

what matters is that this disgruntled bride got her say in and disrupted a site where most of us have come to rely on for support from out peers and as a learning tool to help better ourselves  in our craft and art of creating amazing cakes and confections. 

How did this thread disrupt CakeCentral?

hbquikcomjamesl Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 8:02pm
post #106 of 112

Lots of us are easily offended in general. Some of us are easily offended by a very few things (insinuations that I would want to "do the right thing for the wrong reason" are the quickest, easiest way [short of accusing me of treason] to get me to "rip the offender a new one"). And some of us are not easily offended at all.


Yesterday, I was at Carson Mall (or as it's known today, "South Bay Galleria"), waiting for Shoe Wiz to finish a small alteration on a new pair of shoes, and there seemed to be some kind of small bridal show going on. I got to talking shop with the representative of a cupcake-catering-and-wedding-photography outfit, mentioning the cake I'd done for the Printing Museum, and mentioning as how, for events like Ben Franklin's Birthday, they normally went with Costco cakes, remarking that they were "not half-bad, for what they were." She agreed with me, remarking that she'd had their chocolate cake. And indeed, the year before I took the proverbial bull by the horns and started baking cakes myself, I'd bought my birthday cake from Ralphs, a cheap, small, single-layer 9" round. (There wouldn't be a lot of people eating it, and my waistline didn't need anything very big!) It wasn't half-bad, either, again, considering what it was.

Pyro Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 9:36pm
post #107 of 112

I think most of the grief people have with Walmart is the delusion of some of the people who shop there. Walmart as altered the perception of " the real world " of a lot of people because of the way it does business. Because of their size, the guerilla tactics with it's suppliers, cheap / illegal labor and so on, all of which you can read on your own time on google.

 

Because of this when people shop outside of Walmart they expect things to be the same as at Walmart. This is how things end up.

 

We are going to call a cake layer a pound of meat. People shopping at Walmart saw a pound of meat for 10$.  But they saw on tv that you can have a pound of meat and bun plus you can add mustard, ketchup, and lettuce and WOW did that look good ! They go to the local bakeshop and want to order that. But why stop there, they want two pounds of meat stacked with bacon bits, ketchup, mustard, lettuce and onions rings on top of the bun. And they want this for 15$.

 

Now the baker is stuck, he as to explain to the client " I'm sorry, my meat is grass fed in a field by local farmers, it's prime meat and I can do a pound for 30$ so sorry I can't help.  Client goes to an other bakery, that bakery gets it's meat from a big supplier in an other state, all the meat is from animals raised inside a closed barn fed mixes of " healthy " food to help the growth. That baker can sell that pound of meat for 25$.

 

The delusion of the shopper is that their pound of meat from Walmart (  meat being a cake layer), is actually like 50% kitchen sponge created in a lab ( the chemicals ) and 50% meat from an obscure supplier from a distant place. Now the client is stuck between getting a full pound of 50/50 meat from Walmart of 1/2 a pound at their local bakery for a higher price. Nagging, Haggling and all the rest now comes into play. These people won't be happy with the half pound , they want the whole burger and condiment, they already made up their mind. You are now that " horrible person " who won't help them.

 

Now again everyone knows Walmart can easily take a loss in a cake to sell you supplies and other goods. It's part of how they work. Drive the price down, competition dies because they can't keep up. Again for an other thread and google on your time.

 

 

 

With all that said, I REALLY don't think the problem everyone as is with the poor John and Jane of the universe who live on low income and have a hard time getting by with todays economic downtimes. These people most likely don't even step near bakeries.  The people who grief owners are the delusional ones who want prime meat instead of kitchen sponge filled meat, for cheap.

 

Also, I personally don't understand. Even if I had a really hard time getting by, why someone would want to eat kitchen sponge cake. Ever. Just to make it look like there's more ? Kitchen sponges are not " more ". I have no issue with the people who don't care thought, if you are in the other categories, value your health a bit and get real about what to expect outside Walmart.

 

 

 

PS: Again meat refered to " single layer of cake ". And Walmart as also good products and decent quality. Because of the guerilla they give the supplier they can have the same products as elsewhere for cheaper. They also buy more. Google on your own time.  But here we were specifically talking about the cake.

Carrie789 Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 10:58pm
post #108 of 112

I am frequently reminded of what Dr. Wayne Dyer said (seen on PBS and author of The Power of Intention), "There seems to be a lot of people who walk around intending to be offended." To those people, I say, "Enjoy. You must be getting something out of it."

 

The bride who was upset with her Walmart cake didn't do her homework and learn the difference between mass produced and custom cakes. I am sorry for her. To those of you who are offended when a customer asks for a lower price, get over it.  As they teach in assertiveness classes, "You have the right to ask, and I have the right to say 'No.'"

 

Why does it have to be one or the other? I like hamburgers, and I like steak. If the budget allows, Ruth's Cris Steak House is wonderful ($100 per person +). But, when I am hungry for lunch, I am perfectly happy with McDonald's. I like cakes from Walmart, Costco, Safeway, Fry's, etc. I also like Cathy's rum cake from what was(and probably still is) the most famous and tastiest cake baker in the area. They all have their place on my tastebuds, but not always in my budget.

 

Sometimes, the whole wedding comes from Walmart.  Not everyone can afford or appreciate your beautiful, delicious custom cakes. So what? And, to those whose custom cakes are not so beautiful and delicious, I enjoy your work on cake wrecks every morning.

Annabakescakes Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 11:27pm
post #109 of 112
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrie789 

I am frequently reminded of what Dr. Wayne Dyer said (seen on PBS and author of The Power of Intention), "There seems to be a lot of people who walk around intending to be offended." To those people, I say, "Enjoy. You must be getting something out of it."

 

The bride who was upset with her Walmart cake didn't do her homework and learn the difference between mass produced and custom cakes. I am sorry for her. To those of you who are offended when a customer asks for a lower price, get over it.  As they teach in assertiveness classes, "You have the right to ask, and I have the right to say 'No.'"

 

Why does it have to be one or the other? I like hamburgers, and I like steak. If the budget allows, Ruth's Cris Steak House is wonderful ($100 per person +). But, when I am hungry for lunch, I am perfectly happy with McDonald's. I like cakes from Walmart, Costco, Safeway, Fry's, etc. I also like Cathy's rum cake from what was(and probably still is) the most famous and tastiest cake baker in the area. They all have their place on my tastebuds, but not always in my budget.

 

Sometimes, the whole wedding comes from Walmart.  Not everyone can afford or appreciate your beautiful, delicious custom cakes. So what? And, to those whose custom cakes are not so beautiful and delicious, I enjoy your work on cake wrecks every morning.

Best post ever!

HELLOsamii Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 11:44pm
post #110 of 112

AI think that was the best post in the whole thread.

Cakemommy2012 Posted 21 Apr 2013 , 11:47pm
post #111 of 112

Wins the Award for Best post ever!
 

Carrie789 Posted 22 Apr 2013 , 6:21pm
post #112 of 112

Thanks for the nice words. I am a grandmother, and being a caker is the first job I have ever loved.
 

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