LovelyCakes4Us Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 3:13am
post #1 of

What looks better to the customer? (consultations only)

 

A. White chef coat,jeans or black slacks,black crocs (bakery shoes)

 

 

B. Custom designed t shirt with business logo, jeans, crocs or plain shoes. (current attire)

 

 

I would like to wear a chefs coat to consultations, i have my consults out of a coffee shop. Do you think sporting a chef coat would be doing to much? 

37 replies
IAmPamCakes Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 3:18am
post #2 of

AI think it depends on the image you would like to project for your business. I like to be casual, but I'm clean, my hair is neatly pulled back, face is on, and I carry myself well. I'm sure you will come off more approachable (less intimidating) in a logo T-shirt and nice pants/jeans.

Norasmom Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 3:31am
post #3 of

Either one is fine, as long as you don't look sloppy.  If I ever were to do consultations, I would wear a really cute apron with my business name on it.  

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 3:31am
post #4 of

i think the chef's jkt is good if it is your coffee shop--if you own it--if it's part of the bake shop

 

but if you are a guest there--naw--

 

me, i would dress incognito but nothing wrong with the logo shirt (a little boring--no offense)

 

but the chef's jacket is great for deliveries!! gets you in & out of places with ease

 

just my opinion

 

in fact at a consult i like to dress more of a cross between artsy and business--leaning more toward artsy-

scrumdiddlycakes Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 3:51am
post #5 of

I think a chef's coat is a bit pretentious for a coffee shop. I wear one when I'm in my kitchen, so if I do a consult there I will wear it. Elsewhere, I just go smart casual. You still want to look professional though, so I would steer away from things like crocs.

I would go for something like dark tailored jeans and a nice but simple top, if you want a logo, I'd make it small and up on the left hand side, and nice flats.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 4:35am
post #6 of

i want to come off as she who must be obeyed and not d---ed with

 

i think you need to dress the way you wanna come off

 

you wanna come off logo shirty do it like tons of other workers

 

you wanna come off exclusive and an expert in your field --figure out how that looks--just short of the chef's coat if you're out of your own territory (for the consult)

 

set yourself apart i think

 

typically it's a bridal party you're dealing with--dress business bridal! icon_biggrin.gif

jason_kraft Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 5:40am
post #7 of

A

Original message sent by -K8memphis

i think the chef's jkt is good if it is your coffee shop--if you own it--if it's part of the bake shop

but if you are a guest there--naw--

me, i would dress incognito but nothing wrong with the logo shirt (a little boring--no offense)

Agreed, wearing your chef's coat as a guest in a coffee shop seems a little off to me.

I recommend dressing at the same level or slightly more formal than the target market you are aiming for.

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 1:49pm
post #8 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


I recommend dressing at the same level or slightly more formal than the target market you are aiming for.

 

this ^^^ yes more formal

 

more assured-- complete assurance --to me you wanna say 'i own this' meeting

 

in the consult you are the originator and salesperson of magic

 

to me a logo shirt or an apron  says 'i need an identity so i'm wearing it to remind us' or 'show me to the dishroom'

 

that's just my view of that kind of attire for a consult

 

when a catering company or the wedding coordinator and staff make the magic at the event--that's when you break out the monogramed clothing, chef's jacket to deliver 

 

we're a team we're rock solid we're getting it done for you

 

business bridal for a consult  icon_biggrin.gif

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 2:12pm
post #9 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

 

 yes more formal

 

more assured-- complete assurance --to me you wanna say 'i own this' meeting

 

in the consult you are the originator and salesperson of magic

 

to me a logo shirt or an apron  says 'i need an identity so i'm wearing it to remind us' or 'show me to the dishroom'

 

that's just my view of that kind of attire for a consult

 

when a catering company or the wedding coordinator and staff make the magic at the event--that's when you break out the monogramed clothing, chef's jacket to deliver 

 

we're a team we're rock solid we're getting it done for you

 

business bridal for a consult  icon_biggrin.gif

 

 i should say for a consult off your property--not on your own turf

bittersweety Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 5:27pm

i always make sure my hair is casual but pretty and my makeup is on. As far as clothing though, i always wear jeans, nice boots, and a simple but nice top.  I look nice, but not fussy.  I say classy casual is the way to go :) makes the whole consult comfortable but nice :)

experimenting Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 5:51pm

ADo you all feel the same for a bridal expo? Is a polo with an embroidered logo okay or would nicer attire be recommended?

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 6:01pm

i think being identified with your company in as many ways as possible is the best for an event crawling with vendors

 

logo chef coat, nice logo shirt, dress pants---dressed sharp and confident

 

i would want everyone on my team dressed in logo attire or not at all--

 

otherwise maybe the same color scheme--nice name tags would work

 

i love printed t-shirts -- but i would wear those in the shop working

 

business bridal for a show ;)

 

imo

vgcea Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 6:12pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by jason_kraft 


Agreed, wearing your chef's coat as a guest in a coffee shop seems a little off to me.

I recommend dressing at the same level or slightly more formal than the target market you are aiming for.

icon_cool.gif *Reaches for CK dress, black leather pumps, designer purse and fancy shades.  Flips hair.*  Got cake?

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 6:56pm

Love the idea of wearing a chef coat for event delivery's icon_biggrin.gif, as for hair and make-up that's no issue for me lol i'm sort of a diva as my family says shhh.gif

 

Will stick with my logo shirt nice pants and shoes thanks lady's.

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 6:57pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by vgcea 

icon_cool.gif *Reaches for CK dress, black leather pumps, designer purse and fancy shades.  Flips hair.*  Got cake?

HAHA!icon_biggrin.gif

jason_kraft Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 9:45pm

A

Original message sent by experimenting

Do you all feel the same for a bridal expo? Is a polo with an embroidered logo okay or would nicer attire be recommended?

For an expo where you are professionally representing your company I would recommend a chef's coat. Whenever we participated in vendor fairs (focused on gluten-free and allergy-friendly products, not weddings) my wife would wear her chef's coat and I would wear business casual attire.

experimenting Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 11:44pm

AA chef's coat says to me that you've gone to culinary school. Is that a misconception?

-K8memphis Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 11:45pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by experimenting 

A chef's coat says to me that you've gone to culinary school. Is that a misconception?

 

  yes

 

there are no rules on it or anything

vgcea Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 5:26am

So like, can I call myself a chef? I've never really figured that one out. What does it take to be qualified as a chef?

jason_kraft Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 5:40am

A

Original message sent by vgcea

So like, can I call myself a chef? I've never really figured that one out. What does it take to be qualified as a chef?

If you are responsible for food that you send out of your kitchen, you can call yourself a chef.

ApplegumPam Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 6:33am

As a fully qualified chef who served a 4 year apprenticeship - I think you need to have EARNED your chef's jackets

I know people wear them in the cake industry and am not saying this is wrong - I do think it is OVERLY simplistic to suggest that if you send food out of a kitchen you can call yourself a chef!

The ONLY people that will agree with that are those that haven't served their time! LOL
 

AZCouture Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 6:57am

How 'bout pastry chef? I see that term used very loosely as well. icon_lol.gif

ApplegumPam Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 7:09am

Yep - same thing here Jamie - a pastry-chef is required to serve their time too - 3-4 years of on the job training which includes 1 full day per week in a school environment.   Not wanting to cause friction here just bit of a bee in my bonnet about how you can now just walk into a store and purchase a jacket - don it and have people ASSUME you are qualified.    Guess I think it sort of 'cheapens' the trade.   ahhhhh - its the same as the gazillion people who buy a bag of icing and a packet mix and tomorrow they are selling cakes.............. grrrrr - have to forgive me it is Sunday night here!   been bogged down with ridiculous emails for hours and feeling GRUMPY!! 

-K8memphis Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 1:22pm
Quote:

Quote:

Originally Posted by ApplegumPam

The ONLY people that will agree with that are those that haven't served their time! LOL

 

 

 

oh please. there are no requirements necessary for wearing a chef's jacket

 

i had the privilege of attending the world pastry forum where mof's abound as well as the most famous to annonymous pastry chefs

 

everyone* attending got a personally monogramed chef coat--and we were required/blessed to wear them daily to gain admittance into class

 

(*mine says world pastry forum due to late registration--but i like that better actually ;)

 

the world in general and the pastry world in particular does not set any requirements except to those enrolled in school

 

it's ok to be disgruntled about it if your superiors made you wait and held it out like a carrot but please don't spread misinformation

 

truly some people's jackets mean more than others but anyone can freely wear one despite the grumblings of a few

LovelyCakes4Us Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 2:27pm

A

Original message sent by -K8memphis

oh please. there are no requirements necessary for wearing a chef's jacket

i had the privilege of attending the world pastry forum where mof's abound as well as the most famous to annonymous pastry chefs

everyone* attending got a personally monogramed chef coat--and we were required/blessed to wear them daily to gain admittance into class

(*mine says world pastry forum due to late registration--but i like that better actually ;)

[I][B]the world in general and the pastry world in particular does[/B][/I] [B][U]not[/U][/B] [I][B]set any requirements except to those enrolled in school[/B][/I]

it's ok to be disgruntled about it if your superiors made you wait and held it out like a carrot but please don't spread misinformation

truly some people's jackets mean more than others but anyone can freely wear one despite the grumblings of a few

I feel the same, figuring i have put TONS of dollars and 4 years of re search trial and error perfecting my recipes I consider myself a pastry chef hehe :).

BrandisBaked Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 3:12pm

AI wear a chef coat for deliveries and to bridal shows or events. At events I wear it to let people know that I am the chef and the person making their cake, not just someone who works for me.

-K8memphis Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 3:29pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by LovelyCakes4Us 


I feel the same, figuring i have put TONS of dollars and 4 years of re search trial and error perfecting my recipes I consider myself a pastry chef hehe icon_smile.gif.

 

and more power to you

 

i do not consider myself a pastry chef--i'm a baker and a sugar artist--usually i just say cake decorator--but i proudly wear my chef coat

 

the international association of culinary professionals and the american culinary federation gave me 30 continuing education points

 

so i guess i'm on my way ...any minute now...

 

icon_biggrin.gif

jason_kraft Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 3:38pm

A

Original message sent by ApplegumPam

I do think it is OVERLY simplistic to suggest that if you send food out of a kitchen you can call yourself a chef!

I agree...if you just send food out of a kitchen you are a cook. If you are responsible and accountable for the quality of the food coming out of a kitchen, you are a chef. If that food is a dessert, you are a pastry chef.

CWR41 Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 4:31pm

Chef just means that you are any cook or the chief cook of your kitchen.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/chef
 

-K8memphis Posted 10 Mar 2013 , 4:47pm
Quote:
Originally Posted by -K8memphis 

 

i had the privilege of attending the world pastry forum where mof's abound as well as the most famous to annonymous pastry chefs

 

everyone* attending got a personally monogramed chef coat--and we were required/blessed to wear them daily to gain admittance into class

 

 

as well as just regular people --just whosoever wanted to attend the event -- it is open to the general public to attend

 

i mentioned the mof's and pastry chefs just to point out not one of them objected to any random human being donning the chef jacket

 

and an mof would be particulary testy about an infraction of protocol

 

it's not the jacket that makes the chef by any means

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