BarbVanHorn Posted 7 Mar 2013 , 4:00pm
post #1 of

I would love to find a great recipe for poured fondant for petit fours.  I've done some searching and can't seem to find the right consistency.  Most seem to be way too thin.  Anyone have a good one they would be willing to share?

54 replies
ddaigle Posted 7 Mar 2013 , 4:05pm
post #2 of

I use the typical one on the internet...1/2c water, 1/2 corn syrup, 1 21b. bag of PS, 2tsp almond.    Heat determines your consistancy.    The more you warm it up...the thinner it gets.  I have done about a million PT4s (actually love doing them) and know by stirring what consistancy I like.    I keep my left over PT4 icing in the frig...and zap it in the microwave until I get the consistancy I like.  HTH

shanter Posted 7 Mar 2013 , 4:38pm
post #3 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddaigle 

I use the typical one on the internet...1/2c water, 1/2 corn syrup, 1 21b. bag of PS, 2tsp almond.

 

Is that 1/2 cup of corn syrup? and one 2-pound bag of powdered sugar?

Thanks for the recipe.

ddaigle Posted 7 Mar 2013 , 5:07pm
post #4 of

yes...sorry.  I believe it is the standard one all over the internet.    I should wear my glasses more!   icon_eek.gif

BarbVanHorn Posted 8 Mar 2013 , 4:26pm
post #5 of

Have you ever made a chocolate poured fondant?

ddaigle Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 4:45pm
post #6 of

I'm sorry....I'm not getting notified of new postings.    I have not made a chocolate PT4 icing.  I'm sure it would be good.   

BakingIrene Posted 9 Mar 2013 , 9:51pm
post #7 of

Try mixing cocoa powder with boiling water 1/2 cup cocoa and 1 cup water.  Let that cool and strain it.

 

Then use that as the liquid in the recipe already posted here.  I would recommend avoiding other forms of real chocolate because the fat seems to make this stuff a lot harder to pour.

 

I mix this kind of icing to a stiff consistency, and then heat it in a double boiler.  THEN adjust with drops of water so that it will coat the spoon.  The way it coats the spoon is the way it coats the cakes.  Put them on a baking rack over a pan to re-heat and re-use the drips.

ddaigle Posted 13 Aug 2013 , 11:32pm
post #8 of

Hey Irene...I'm actually needing a chocolate PT4 icing recipe....i see you posted yours.   That 1C of boiling water with the cocoa powder replaces ALL the liquid in traditional recipe?   So there is no corn syrup in the chocolate version?     Will it set up hard like the traditional PT4 that uses corn syrup?  Thanks. 

MBalaska Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 12:31am
post #9 of

Quote:

Originally Posted by ddaigle 

I use the typical one on the internet...1/2c water, 1/2 corn syrup, 1 21b. bag of PS, 2tsp almond.    Heat determines your consistancy.    The more you warm it up...the thinner it gets.  I have done about a million PT4s (actually love doing them) and know by stirring what consistancy I like.    I keep my left over PT4 icing in the frig...and zap it in the microwave until I get the consistancy I like.  HTH

ddiagle: that's similar to the cookie glaze. How does heating affect the colors, & what type of coloring do you use in this recipe?      PS: where did you find those nice Chevron Cutters?

MBalaska Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 12:34am

Quote:

Originally Posted by BakingIrene 

Try mixing cocoa powder with boiling water 1/2 cup cocoa and 1 cup water.  Let that cool and strain it.

 

Then use that as the liquid in the recipe already posted here.  I would recommend avoiding other forms of real chocolate because the fat seems to make this stuff a lot harder to pour.

 

I mix this kind of icing to a stiff consistency, and then heat it in a double boiler.  THEN adjust with drops of water so that it will coat the spoon.  The way it coats the spoon is the way it coats the cakes.  Put them on a baking rack over a pan to re-heat and re-use the drips.

BakingIrene: coating the spoon to test consistency. great tip. thanks. 

ddaigle Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 12:47am

I use my Americolor gel colors.   Don't have any problems.     My PT4 icing recipe is not the same as my cookie glaze...which is Royal Icing. 

 

I found a chocolate PT4 recipe on wilton.com.    Gonna try it.  I just don't want to use unsweetened chocolate.   I can barely tolerate semi sweet.   Everything else is so bitter.   I'm gonna use semi-sweet chips.

 

MB...I got the cutters off of Etsy...I LOVEEEEEEEE them.     I got 4 different sizes.   It's from some "Plastics in Print" company.   Since the soccer ball print wants to make me stick a dowel rod in my neck...I ordered those cutters from there too.   I'm using them this weekend.

MBalaska Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 2:01am

ddiagle:  your recipe and instructions make coating pt4's sound easy, post your results on the choc ones.plz

 

Oh Jackpot!   http://www.etsy.com/shop/PlasticsinPrint?ref=pr_shop_more     

when you have a couple hundred cookie cutters, why not buy one or two  more?  There are so many FireFighters, Troopers, Police, Military, Fish & Game, people to bake for The Chevrons will be helpful. 

ddaigle Posted 14 Aug 2013 , 1:03pm

MB...I have done a million PT4s.  I think they are super easy.    Takes a little practice and a specific pattern for pouring all four corners,  but once you get your groove figured out..it's easy peasy.

 

I love Plastics 'n Prints stuff.    The chevron cutters I got came in 4 different sizes.   They have good stuff and prices are very good. 

 

I'm doing the chocolate ones Saturday...will post results. 

MBalaska Posted 15 Aug 2013 , 7:16am

ddaigle: my next project, bake pound cake, coat with your pt4 icing, decorate.  taste.  no wait......photo if it looks ok....... then taste. 

ddaigle Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 1:24pm

Good!  Let me know your results.   I think I will takes pictures of my steps this weekend.   Pictures are just so better than lengthy written instructions. 

anavillatoro1 Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:45pm

AWait I am confused the recipe is - 1/2 c of water -1/2 c corn syrup - 1 bag of 2 pounds of powder sugar - 2tsp almond right ? Tanks for the recipe I always thought that poured fondant was the real fondant melted. How roong I whas thank you.

ddaigle Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:48pm

I call it PT4 icing...but some places I see online call it "poured fondant"   It seems like a confusing title to me...but I think there are other variations of the recipe too.  My recipe is for the stuff you see on traditional Petit Fours. 

anavillatoro1 Posted 16 Aug 2013 , 2:53pm

AClever thank you

MBalaska Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 12:31am

Petit fours - Gave it a first try.  I can self evaluate several issues that need correcting: and if unable to correct, I will admit this is above my skill level & leave it to the pros. My fondant daisies are ok. however:

  • uneven sized pieces.
  • cake too tall.  (2" high)
  • pieces too big.
  • cake too tender/soft, crumbled under pouring.
  • icing not thinned enough.

 

It sure tasted good though!  & when it dried you could pick it up with fingers and eat.

ddaigle Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 12:40am

woohoo!   Great job MB.  I have started the process here and have been taking pictures along the way.   Will finish up tomorrow and type up my tutorial.    I have a few pointers for you that will fix the issues you addressed. 

MimiFix Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 1:06am

Yes, great job MB! And Cake Sarge, I can't wait to see your photos and tutorial. My petit fours technique can also use improving.

MBalaska Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 2:12am

Thanks for encouragement DD & MIMI.  I'LL BOLO for your Petit Four Tutorial !!

 

(I can aim for the stars, yet I can't even get to the top of my roof, without a good solid foundation to put my sturdy ladder on, and taking one successful step up at a time)

ddaigle Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:13pm

OK..I did my first tutorial.   I don't know where it is! LOL.....I hope I make it easy to read.  Those that try it, please let me know if there are any confusing steps..of if I left something out.   

Dayti Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:30pm

Here's the link to your tutorial http://cakecentral.com/a/how-to-do-petit-fours-my-way It's at the top of all of them in the Tutorials tab above. I'm going to go and read it now! I'm sure I don't have the patience though...

ddaigle Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:33pm

Thanks Dayti.

Dayti Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:38pm

OK I will have to try these. I see that having the cakes cold would make all the difference in terms of workability and less crumbs everywhere. Good snacking opportunities too! I like that you put buttercream icing on top, yum. Just wondering how much you sell these for? And do you usually have a minimum quantity per flavour? I guess it depends on what size cake you decide to bake initially and how many squares you get out of each size, to avoid much waste. 

ddaigle Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:41pm

Normally people order 2 dozen.   I usually put a little rose bud on top and sell them for $1.10 ea.   That is pretty consistent pricing around here.   I would price them for your area.  I forget how many I get out of a quarter sheet pan.   You would have to flip the pan over that you decide to use and using your ruler, see how many you can get. 

ddaigle Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:42pm

Oh...and this is the first time ever I had chocolate and lemon.  I need a minimum because I baked an entire quarter sheet for 8 little squares.   I froze the rest for future use, but the odds of me getting more lemon orders are rare. 

Dayti Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:45pm

Seems like a lot of work for $1.10 per piece. I guess you are very fast! I'll try them anyway, I love the look and with the right cake and BC I'm sure they'd be delicious. Chocolate fondant icing sounds good too. 

ddaigle Posted 17 Aug 2013 , 6:47pm

Dayti...if you sell them in Spain, check out the pricing from your local bakeries.   You may sell them there for far more then I do.  You want your pricing to be consistent with your local competition. 

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