BuffytheBakingSlayer Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 6:35pm
post #1 of

Not sure if this question should be here or in decorating, but here it goes.

 

Would this work for a cake?  Would there be any major issues with this?

 

I intend to make a chocolate layer cake, with ganache between the cake layers.  So that I could do ahead, I had a plan to bake the cake layers ahead and freeze. 

 

I also planned to make ganache "discs".  I would pour ganache into the cake pan (so it is the same size as cake), and then freeze those discs.  Then I would later assemble the cake and ganache disc layers, and then cover the whole thing with a liquid ganache (maybe even white choco ganache).

 

Would this work, or would I have issues with the ganache discs as they thaw?  Would I be better off just using "fresh" whipped ganache as the layering?

 

Thanks!

6 replies
DeliciousDesserts Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 8:04pm
post #2 of

AThat's not the way I would do it.

Typically layers need a dam to prevent filling from leaking. Ganache does get a bit hard bi still risky.

There are many YouTube videos on torting & filling. Doesn't have to specifically be those flavors for you to get the idea. You'll want to pipe a nice thick ring around the rim I each layer, then fill with ganache. I like to the use my small spatula to patch any spaces around the side.

BakingIrene Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 8:15pm
post #3 of

The ganache needs to be at room temperature not warm as freshly made ganache is warm. 

 

Your other option is to fully chill the ganache and then blend it up in a food processor.  That will allow it to spread well onto layers.  Either way you must chill the filled cake layers until the ganache firms up before you try to crumb coat.

 

If the filling is ganache then I do not use a dam, as long as the ganache is starting to set up it will not run out between cake payers.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 8:22pm
post #4 of

ANow this is a great example of the fact that there are many methods.

I use a dam & I use warm pourable ganache.

DeliciousDesserts Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 8:23pm
post #5 of

AI think what you are really askin is the best method to do this cake ahead of time & freeze. Is that right?

If so, make it the way you usually do, wrap tightly, & freeze. Ganache freezes & thaws well.

mcaulir Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 9:09pm
post #6 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeliciousDesserts 

I think what you are really askin is the best method to do this cake ahead of time & freeze. Is that right?

If so, make it the way you usually do, wrap tightly, & freeze. Ganache freezes & thaws well.

Yes, do this. Your plan sounds unecessarily complicated, OP!

BuffytheBakingSlayer Posted 6 Mar 2013 , 11:52pm
post #7 of
Quote:
Originally Posted by BakingIrene 

The ganache needs to be at room temperature not warm as freshly made ganache is warm. 

 

Not sure if I was clear, the fresh (or warmish) was only for pouring over the entire cake. So i would need that at a temp that is pourable.

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